Toddavid

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About Toddavid

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SE PA
  • Interests
    Power!

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  1. Dunno if you saw this, but it looks like a heck of a deal. VP, though... https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10210968323384892&set=gm.1570259046375566&type=3&theater&ifg=1
  2. Plenty of clearance, riding level with the truck, already did a few hundred mixed miles, no issues.
  3. New rig (below) delivered last week. Old rig sold today. I'm happy!
  4. Apparently you're not the only one! https://www.facebook.com/groups/102848980271/permalink/10155797862765272/
  5. Welp, seems that some injuries are being "claimed": http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2018/01/chilling_video_fisherman_jumps.html
  6. For what it's worth, here's the font closest to the Chap font that I've found, should you want to get all matchy: https://ufonts.com/fonts/mustardo-oblique.html
  7. Apparently all were unharmed, driver of the other boat was texting and distracted, and the owner of the boat he hit is suing him for $400k in damages. https://www.facebook.com/ABCWorldNewsNow/videos/10156939765870278/
  8. Oops, and there you go: http://boatingindustry.com/news/2017/06/26/cobalt-wins-2-7m-patent-suit-against-brunswick/
  9. As far as I know, the Cobalt Swim Step is patented, but I have noticed similar designs being used by other manufacturers. Maybe they are using it on license and Chap didn't want to pay.
  10. Are you keeping it in a slip or towing with those covers on? Either way, I'd be worried about the skirts being unsecured and flapping around in the wind and marring the gelcoat. Typically, as I'm sure you know, the perimeter of cockpit covers are secured by snaps and towing covers have belly straps.
  11. Above the rubrail colored gelcoat is the risk, not below the waterline. Sun oxidation.
  12. Quite a few on Boattrader: http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2014-chaparral-264-sunesta-103121583 http://www.boattrader.com/listing/2014-chaparral-264-sunesta-102919921 Google images: https://goo.gl/images/dZ2gD5 https://goo.gl/images/617Npu https://goo.gl/images/h9Qkjh etc.
  13. 4 hours, 24 minutes, and 8 seconds at 31.9F exactly. Seriously, unless you want to go through another $7k lesson, just spend $100 for someone down there to winterize for you, or only bring it home in May. Or, learn how to winterize it properly yourself, with muffs and anti-freeze, so you can leap into action should you decide to bring it home earlier and the weather turns against you. Sounds like you're being a penny-wise here with such a high-cost consequence on the line. There are too many variables to reliably predict exactly how long at what temp you will see unrepairable block cracking, and at such a low cost to winterize, why even try to find out? IMO.
  14. Not sure how flushing would have prevented this issue, if we're talking about the same corrosion point: where the raw water inlet hose crosses the transom. The corrosion happens around the rubber hose, external to it. And slowly crushes the hose shut. Flushing with fresh water wouldn't touch that area. Sounds like disconnecting the mercathode system, to accommodate a storage contraption, made matters worse, but you can't fault the designers for an anamoly like that. I don't know how many seapens you have down under, but I've never seen such a product like that in the US, which is the majority of the recreational stern drive market.