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Iggy

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Out side of Boston
  • Interests
    I am a computer tech by trade. I like working with my hands ether building or fixing things. Into R.C. planes, woodworking but not my strong point.

    I love boating and going to new places by boat. In some cases it been a fun and a learning curve. At times living on the boat up to a week on vac.

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  1. I am waiting for the new part to come in. So the port engine works good now.
  2. I just did a 7 day trip doing about 150 miles. Not sure if that matters, but anyways. The day before leaving I was at the gas dock. I restarted (I have twin 4.3L ) the engines. I put the port engine in gear and had a small bang from the drive engaging. I first thought drive problem and noticed that engine was at 1800 RPMs. The next day, Saturday made it home with no problems, both engines ran great. Today, after a little reading went after the IAC unit. Mainly I was reading no start or stalling. I pulled the IAC unit off the starboard engine, installed it in the port engine and now it idles fine. Just though I would mention it since everything I read never mentioned high idle. So new IAC!!
  3. Iggy

    Poor acceleration

    Could the oil filter be clogged causing the pressure to go dowm?
  4. To each their own! There are many ways to look at this. First I would check the complete setup and make sure that the #2 battery is charging when the switch is on #1. The switch alone can not do this. You must have a battery combiner or a ARC. Running on Both is all well and good. But it gives you no backup. I size my batteries to my load and how long I wish to use that load. Keeping in mind that I have a 2nd bank to fall bank onto. Or what I call my house bank of 3 batteries, that powers my fridge, music, head.............. Than my starting battery
  5. I would go with a dual battery setup. Two batteries and on switch. The swtich has "OFF" Battery 1 ON , Battery 2 ON and BOTH. A four position switch.
  6. Iggy

    windlass

    Go for it! There are many u-Tube videos on this. Lewmar makes a great windless and there web site is very helpful. I would check it out.
  7. This goes back to local knowledge. What works for your area may not work for others. As JJlai mentioned and I wholeheartedly agree.
  8. That remains to be seen. This storm was more than the average thunderstorm. Thunderstorms are a funny thing, they can come out on where and last only minutes. It could be down pouring where you are and one mile away is nothing. But I don't want to get into a deep discussion. But I would rather be prepared, than not. You could have engine trouble and not get back to the dock on time. Than get caught up in a storm. A good boater has the right equipment on board or at least try. Thats why the make PFDs, EPIRBs, Flares and more. You don't know what can happen.
  9. Looking at the pic I dont think you have a GFI outlet. But I was thinking you may have some form of one. My wife comes from France and we visit there every few years. I have never seen one there. In the U.S. it is required by law (every state in the U.S. is a little different) to use a GFI outlet in wet locations. This is a safety device that helps stop electacutions from happening. Case on point, if you dropped a hair dryer in the tub and some one was in it. Chances are they would be dead. But with a GFI outlet in the bathroom, chances are they would be alive. In milliseconds it turns the power off. I would look at the wiring, both at the breaker and outlet.
  10. I would have to agree. But I am a salt water boater that has 50' of chain on a 30' foot boat. My normal anchoring depth is between 12 to 30 feet. Remember too, we are talking in general situations. The newbie does not care what works for me. But how the anchoring system, I should say ground tackle works. But this also goes back to local knowledge. In some spots 6' of chain is just fine, others may need 12'. As to SST, no such thing it came out of nowhere. I have told this story many times. Years ago in Boston Harbor we were anchored. There were reports of thunder storms for that day. But these storms ether don't show up or very isolated. We were ready to pull anchor and go home. Then we saw a storm go from south to north passing right over Boston 4 miles away from us. We decided to stay since the storm would be in our path. For us it was almost uneventful. It got a little dark and the wind picked up to 10kph. I just got radar and really did not know how to use it. I had a experienced boater on board and he looked at the radar. He said that the storm just made a U turn and heading for us. I run to the bow and let out my entire rode 50 ft of chain and 200 feet of line. Well, we got hit with 60 mph winds, two boats past us since there anchor was not holding and one ran aground. I dragged about 50 feet in 15 feet of water. My point is, you never know? Looking at the weather or not.
  11. Fortress makes a great anchor! But if you want the best, go with a Rocna. https://rocna.com/ I would ask the local boaters in your area first. They would know what would work best for the bottom your boating in. To recap what other have mentioned. You need 15 to 30ft of chain. For every 1 of water (depth) you need 5 to 7 feet of line or what is called rode. Chain is key in the whole system. https://www.boatingmag.com/how-to/tips-properly-setting-anchor/
  12. I use what I call aircraft nuts. Some people call them slip nuts. The nut has the plastic ring at one end of the nut that stops it from backing off. The other thing you can use is a lock washer.
  13. Yep! and I would check the wiring after that.
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