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TexasPilot71

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Everything posted by TexasPilot71

  1. Good stuff! My battery switch setup is identical except that the switches are aligned alongside each other. I can tie in the starting battery if I deplete the house battery bank. Literally, exact same switches. Interesting that the interface lit up with only GPS power feeding backward. Guess that's the nature of the NMEA2K system. Doesn't matter where the power originates. Wonder if you could even get away with not powering the backbone separately. No reason to do it that way...just wondering how that works. Agree with not wanting bluetooth only. My Raymarine radar is, interestingly, wireless to the chartplotter! Sounds like a good idea...not having to snake a data wire, but I do have to wait about 30 seconds for the wireless connection to be made when powering up the radar. So far, it has never failed to connect, but you know...wireless. I probably wouldn't do that again. Maybe even newer systems will be connectable by NMEA2K. That would be an easier run...from backbone up the arch.
  2. TexasPilot71

    Where is shower sump pump switch on 2003 Chap 320

    Generally, there is no switch. The batteries only need be on. Verify this by pouring some water in the shower drain, watch it fill the sump box (beneath the cabin stairs) and make sure the float switch activates the pump. If so, then you're good. On my boat, there is only a breaker at the helm. No switch. And I have the same warning placard.
  3. TexasPilot71

    Low drive lube warning

    No, not during winterization unless you make it an annual habit to have the drive pulled. Many do, most don't. If you are losing lube and can't find where it's going, good chance it's there and you should pull the drive to see what else is going on. In my case, the gimbal bearing and shaft also needed replaced. Changed the shift cable too.
  4. Ahhhh...ok, thanks. Makes more sense. I'd just say that "they" still suggest the N2K is switched at the helm or elsewhere (other than main battery switch) so that when you're on the hook or drifting, that the network doesn't drain the battery. I think it's probably not a factor for you, but just FYI. Great writeup, BTW!
  5. TexasPilot71

    Low drive lube warning

    Here's what it looked like....
  6. TexasPilot71

    Low drive lube warning

    I had the same issue last summer. The lube was found in the bellows when my mechanic pulled the drive. No lube in the water or in the bilge. Not trying to alarm you, but do understand, you can have a leak and never see the lube. Keep a close eye on it. At least you know your alarm is working!
  7. Right. But you're saying the YachtDevices unit (acting as a gateway) receives its engine data from wiring harness right there at the helm. That's a huge plus!
  8. Yes, that's exactly where my VHF, Chartplotter, and radar are connected. Great point!
  9. Hmmm... I may be a little confused, but if I understand you correctly, you have the N2K network power connected to your ignition so that it is on only when your key in in the on position? If that's how it's set up, you may want to change it. I say that because as you add items to your network, you will want them operating when the engine is off. For instance, my Fusion stereo system and remotes are connected via N2K. I wouldn't be able to use it while engine off if connected through the ignition switch. Also, I suspect that circuit is interrupted when you start the engine. If so, you could potentially damage the circuit (or more likely anything on the circuit) with the voltage drops/spikes. This is beyond my expertise, but I never like cycling a circuit through ignition switch.
  10. Oh, I see. So the YachtDevices unit doesn't need the extra run from helm to engine compartment. That is a nice benefit. In regards to wifi, my Raymarine has a similar option and it works well. The only issue I have with it is that it only mirrors what is on the chartplotter at the moment. So you cannot have the plotter showing GPS and your iPad showing radar. Kinda defeats the purpose unless you use it in the cabin to see what's going on.
  11. @Hatem Nice install! Essentially, just like mine minus the additional gauge (VesselView) at the helm. I like that the unit you installed acts as a gateway and provides N2K data and bluetooth. I too had to run a data cable from the engine. Just didn't need the adapter. Instead, I had to install the junction box, but that was just because I also added the VesselView. One question...is your 12v power to the N2K network switched? It is highly recommended to connect it via a switch. I connected mine through an unused ACC switch. I have not, however been able to find a switch cover that identifies it as such. Hard to believe there isn't a "network" or "n2k" switch cover out there.
  12. But the item he installed above acts as a gateway AND a bluetooth option. No need to spend extra $$
  13. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    Yep, same here. I replaced the Radar too, but because the hole patterns were the same, I went with another Raymarine unit.
  14. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    Yes. I would have probably gone with a different gauge than the VV4 if I weren't also using it as an engine gateway. You have so much more flexibility with the YachtDevices (or Mercury) gateway. Of course, if I had to do it all over again, I would have gone with a SimRad system; although I don't know what they have in the way of a panel device such as the VV4 or your Raymarine idea above. I find the Raymarine lagging in processor power. The SimRad (ESS7, I believe) has much more processing power and less screen lag I am told.
  15. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    Here is my before and after:
  16. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    I think that has more to do with protocol than anything else. There are so many different engine manufacturers and several MFD manufacturers, and they all talk different languages. NMEA2K is an industry standard that various engines and other electronic equipment can interpret and transmit upon.
  17. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    I was told by Mercury that you could not connect the gauges directly to the MFD. At least not the Raymarine MFD that I was using. Garmin may be different, but I don't know. SO, I had to get the data from the engine diagnostics port. If the OP can go directly to his MFD, that is awesome! But again, simply based on my understanding and application, that was not possible. If he has the same limitation, then it seems as if he may be able to take the data that feeds his gauges and (by using a YachtDevides) send that information additionally along a N2K bus, and from there into his MFD/Chartplotter.
  18. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Correct. So the NMEA0183 will serve two purposes. First, it will receive the GPS data from your chartplotter which allows for the DSC functions to work. Second, it will (as we discussed previously) send position data from other vessels to your GPS for display purposes. Now, "position data from other vessels" does not mean AIS data...only DSC data received via your VHF antenna (emergency vessels, or other vessels who have allowed you permission to track).
  19. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    Wow, that's great! Didn't know that was possible. In my case, I had different connectors daisy-chaining the instrument cluster. Once disconnected, I couldn't understand why I couldn't use that data bus to feed the VesselView4 and instead, I had to run a new cable from the diagnostics port. But that's what Mercury told me I had to do.
  20. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    The way I understand it, he wants to "use the existing gauges" as a source of data for the MFD. Because he cannot interface directly from the existing gauges to the MFD, a YachtDevices will (hopefully) translate the data that is already coming into the gauges into NMEA2K data that can then be fed to the MFD. He also mentioned he may want to add additional items to the network down the road. A very wise decision to create an open architecture.
  21. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    I truly DO NOT KNOW for sure, but I would take the time to make absolutely sure the YachtDevices pinout is compatible before I just plugged them in. Might not hurt anything, but I have a sneaking suspicion it isn't plug and play like that.
  22. TexasPilot71

    time to move up... engine(s) question

    Agree! That's why my 250 is for sale and I'm looking at Sedan Bridge Cruisers in the 35-38 foot range with inboards. No more outdrives! I can't imagine having two outdrives.
  23. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Actually, I may have misspoke. @Hatem, the GPS shown in the picture with I presume your hand in the photo is the same GPS as I have, except I do have the GPS label in the upper left corner. It appears you may have an older one without built-in GPS? If so, then what I said above would apply to you...you would need to wire it to your chartplotter (NMEA 0183) to take advantage of any DSC functions. You will not under any circumstances be able to receive AIS data unless you install a separate AIS receiver. I bet the guy at West Marine was explaining that he could show you how to connect that VHF to your chartplotter for GPS/DSC purposes and not AIS. VERY interested to find out what he says next week.
  24. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    I have that exact radio. I think the "GPS confusion" was because there is no GPS button. That is just a label indicating that it has a built-in GPS receiver. If it doesn't have a built in receiver, then it CAN get its GPS data from the chartplotter via NMEA 0183. That is why built-in GPS capability is mentioned and labeled as a feature. Because even if you don't connect it to your chartplotter, the DCS functions still work due to the built in GPS receiver.
  25. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    My installation was a single engine, so there may be significant differences. However, mine was also a 2008 so the communication protocols should be the same. If you have the junction box at the helm, you're way ahead of the game. I am not sure if the presence of that junction box means engine information is already supplied to that junction box. In my instance, I was also installing a VesselView 4 (VV4). A VV4 will act as a gateway. Since the VV4 is located at the helm and I had no existing junction box, I had to run a cable from the engine diagnostics port on the engine to the helm, install and connect it to a junction box, then connect the VV4 to the junction box. The VV4 has a NMEA2K output which I teed into the backbone. Connect the MFD to the NMEA2K backbone as well, and you're done. Let us know what you have, and yes, call Mercury. They are fantastic help!
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