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TexasPilot71

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Everything posted by TexasPilot71

  1. TexasPilot71

    time to move up... engine(s) question

    Agree! That's why my 250 is for sale and I'm looking at Sedan Bridge Cruisers in the 35-38 foot range with inboards. No more outdrives! I can't imagine having two outdrives.
  2. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Actually, I may have misspoke. @Hatem, the GPS shown in the picture with I presume your hand in the photo is the same GPS as I have, except I do have the GPS label in the upper left corner. It appears you may have an older one without built-in GPS? If so, then what I said above would apply to you...you would need to wire it to your chartplotter (NMEA 0183) to take advantage of any DSC functions. You will not under any circumstances be able to receive AIS data unless you install a separate AIS receiver. I bet the guy at West Marine was explaining that he could show you how to connect that VHF to your chartplotter for GPS/DSC purposes and not AIS. VERY interested to find out what he says next week.
  3. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    I have that exact radio. I think the "GPS confusion" was because there is no GPS button. That is just a label indicating that it has a built-in GPS receiver. If it doesn't have a built in receiver, then it CAN get its GPS data from the chartplotter via NMEA 0183. That is why built-in GPS capability is mentioned and labeled as a feature. Because even if you don't connect it to your chartplotter, the DCS functions still work due to the built in GPS receiver.
  4. TexasPilot71

    2008 350 Signature NMEA 2000

    My installation was a single engine, so there may be significant differences. However, mine was also a 2008 so the communication protocols should be the same. If you have the junction box at the helm, you're way ahead of the game. I am not sure if the presence of that junction box means engine information is already supplied to that junction box. In my instance, I was also installing a VesselView 4 (VV4). A VV4 will act as a gateway. Since the VV4 is located at the helm and I had no existing junction box, I had to run a cable from the engine diagnostics port on the engine to the helm, install and connect it to a junction box, then connect the VV4 to the junction box. The VV4 has a NMEA2K output which I teed into the backbone. Connect the MFD to the NMEA2K backbone as well, and you're done. Let us know what you have, and yes, call Mercury. They are fantastic help!
  5. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Gotcha. That's the confusion (mine). VHF radios (the slightly more expensive units) include an AIS receiver built in. Of course, it will not transmit your information, but it will display targets on the MFD if properly connected via NMEA network, and if those targets are in range of your VHF antenna. You've definitely got the better setup, but this is a cheaper way to RECEIVE the data.
  6. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    You said you installed a standalone AIS tranceiver. Therefore your VHF would not have to be "AIS rated". The data is passed along your N2k network with the AIS providing target location and information, the chartplotter and/or VHF providing your own ship location, and it all displayed on the chartplotter. Right?
  7. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Oh wow, that would be cool! Let us know if they can do it.
  8. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Do what? I'm confused.
  9. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Good stuff! I presumed he had to give permission to the request. Didn't know there was an auto feature and I don't know quite enough to get into all the details of HOW to do it. I just know the capability is there.
  10. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Bingo! However, if you have your friends' MMSI programmed into your VHF (AND) you have the VHF wired to the chartplotter, you can see them on your plotter. This is separate from AIS. Also, any boat who used the DSC distress button will show up on any chartplotter connected to the VHF even if you don't have their MMSI entered into your VHF.
  11. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    One last thing. If you replace your VHF with an AIS capable radio and have it connected to your chartplotter...you now have a setup where all vessels with AIS installed (all commercial vessels) will display on your chartplotter. That's the dream setup for someone boating where you do! Here you go... https://www.thegpsstore.com/Standard-Horizon-GX2200-Matrix-AIS-with-GPS-Black-P3968.aspx
  12. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Oh sorry. Yes, I read that. Pretty funny. However, one point: the hailing/tracking only works if you know their MMSI. You would have to have that set into your contacts on the VHF then request their position, hail to talk, etc. I haven't once used mine. We should have set them up before our Bahamas trip so that RRRR, jeffk, and I could all see each other.
  13. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    It works! That is all that matters. Yes, it's great to have the data on the chartplotter. I will admit, I don't use it often (probably because the VesselView 4 also presents all that data nicely), but it would be great to have if I still had my old individual instruments. Regardless, glad it works for you. The other cool thing about having the chartplotter on N2K is that you can control other systems on the boat. I replaced the Clarion stereo with a Fusion N2K head unit and remotes. The chartplotter has a Fusion app that allows me to control the stereo from the chartplotter. Literally gives me complete control over every function. I could have done without the additional remote at the helm, but it's a cleaner installation with the remote. There are even N2K kits you can purchase to wire lights into. Theoretically, you could control lighting, sound, cameras, live wells, and maybe even windlass via the chartplotter if you desired. It's a pretty cool system. Now, regarding VHF. Depending on your VHF unit, you might not have a NMEA 2000 interface. It may be an older NMEA 0183 protocol. If so, you cannot run that on your N2K network. You'll have to wire it into your NMEA 0183 port on your chartplotter (you should have an additional input on the back). As I recall (been a couple years), the NMEA2000 VHF units were very expensive and the vast majority (including my Standard Horizon GX1700) were onlu NMEA 0183 compatible. It was an easy connection, but be aware yours may not support N2K...and that's okay. You get the same functionality, just have to wire it a little differently. In my case, I had to use this cable: https://www.tackledirect.com/raymarine-r70414-video-in-nmea-0183-cable-for-es7-series.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgIOI0seR5AIVOB-tBh3xqghZEAQYASABEgJft_D_BwE Let me know how it goes! If your VHF is already N2K ready, then just plug it into a tee and you're golden.
  14. TexasPilot71

    Always a little water in bilge

    I think it has more to do with the hatch than anything. We all have Chaps, but different models have different hatches. Also, those that stay in the water are bound (in most cases) to get a little water in there. If you trailer, you have the benefit of starting the day with a dry bilge. That helps a lot, I would think.
  15. TexasPilot71

    Weight of 240 Signatur

    My 250 with fuel, water and gear (and radar arch) is right about 8,500. With trailer I'm right at 10k. I bet the 6,826 above is about right.
  16. TexasPilot71

    Oil filter-Which way to turn to get it off

    Good stuff. Another trick would be to cut the end of the tube at an angle so that when it hit bottom, you wouldn't have to pull back as the tube would draw from the side. Regardless, we're making this much more of a science than is required IMHO. Good luck with the polishing! Fun!!
  17. TexasPilot71

    Oil filter-Which way to turn to get it off

    I am by no means an expert, but I had similar concerns when I first purchased and started using an extractor. I was convinced I was leaving a quart and a half behind. I would speculate that with the longer extension, you quite possibly could have curved the tube and it may now be above the bottom of the pan. I remember feeding more than the dip stick length of tube in there and sucking air earlier than anticipated. I ended up pulling it out, measuring off the length of the dipstick on the tube and ensuring I only put that much in there...that ensures you are at the bottom of the pan or at least where the dip stick stops. Then, based on feedback from this forum, I got smart and made up a threaded attachment that I now simply screw onto the dipstick tube and extract the oil THROUGH the dipstick tube. No more sticking a tube down the hole. There are lots of photos and descriptions on the forum. I still don't get it all, but I feel confident I get most.
  18. TexasPilot71

    Oil filter-Which way to turn to get it off

    Just remember to put the new one on only hand-tight ( I recognize you said last time it was just snug) and rub some fresh oil on the new O-ring. You got the old o-ring off, right? You never get all the oil out. Did you warm it up first? That helps get it out and puts any "junk" in suspension for better extraction. If you did, you're probably just fine.
  19. TexasPilot71

    Fuel economy 2003 Signature 320 with 350 Mag

    I know your question is more in regards to speed, but GPH can be found here: https://www.boat-fuel-economy.com/mercury-mercruiser-3.0-181-fuel-consumption-us-gallons
  20. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    Try this again... https://www.google.com/search?q=mercruiser+junction+box&tbm=isch&ved=2ahUKEwjdoLfD9vrjAhUO96wKHfWgAK4Q2-cCegQIABAC&oq=mercruiser+junction+box&gs_l=mobile-gws-wiz-img.3..0i24.38093.39741..40248...0.0..0.83.753.12......0....1.........30i10.7c_L2XyeAmo&ei=aBhQXd3ME47uswX1wYLwCg&bih=543&biw=375&prmd=ivn&rlz=1CDGOYI_enUS777US777&tbs=ircm%3Ap&hl=en-US#imgrc=Qy81tJcZfnKe8M
  21. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    No, I don’t think I have any pictures but they wouldn’t help you anyway. I think my connection was a 15-pin connection (Mercury). Here’s a link: So Mercury and Volvo obviously use different busses but it sounds like the same concept. How to mate your cable to the VOIDA? I have no idea. Would think Volvo would help you though
  22. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    No, no worries on more photos. I just want to hear that you got it working. It’s a great feature. I may have misspoke about the Deutsch connectors. Whatever they are, it seems you’re plugging the VODIA into the source of engine information. I don’t have Volvo so I don’t know what is available. Sounded like you had that solved. In my case, I didn’t have a junction box at the helm, so I ran a cable from the diagnostics port on top of the engine, up the side of the boat to the helm. I then added a junction box and moved the terminator from the port on the engine to one of the ports on the junction box. From there, I plugged in the VesselView which acts as the gateway. There is a N2K port on the VesselView which I ran to the backbone. There is another run from the chart plotter to the backbone. And wallah! Little more involved than you’re doing which is great. If I had the junction box at the helm already, that would be more in line with what you are doing. Substitute VOIDA for VesselView in my case. However, in my case the VV displays everything and is awesome. But I do not have Bluetooth capability like you will. I can install a VesselView Mobile to one of the other junction box ports if I want that. But of course I’m selling the boat. :)
  23. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    That’s a long post and I’m on my phone so I wont quote your reply @Hatem, but I do take your response as you intended. No ill feelings here. You explained it well. I’ll just say that even in those photos, I don’t see a N2K backbone. I’m not arguing your point but simply wanted to provide some thoughts IN CASE you run into the problem I was trying to describe. It took me a while to understand the exact same issue a year or so ago when I added the same capability to my chart plotter. On your hand written diagram, you show the VODIA connected with an extension cable (that’s what’s in your photo) to NMEA2K and your plotter. I’m simply saying you will likely need a N2K backbone to accept the signal from the VODIA and send to your chart plotter in that lower right plug you show on your chart plotter. That’s the exact same way I had to connect mine. I too thought early on that I could bypass the backbone. The backbone has to have 12v power into one of its tees as well. And, both ends of the backbone have to have a terminating resistor. None of that is in any of your photos. Now, I’m happy to be proven wrong. No ego here. But wanted to get you something to go by in case you see the same issue. If, indeed the VODIA can plug directly into your chart plotter, you are saving some work. And I hope that’s the case. All this I have written is “just in case” and is what is trypical in other installations. Best of luck! Wish I got up your way from time to time, but it’s been years since business took me there. Best!
  24. TexasPilot71

    Newbies, do you use your GPS to its fullest?

    That EasyConnect looks cool! It will do both bluetooth to your tablet/phone and connect to a NMEA2000 network (N2K). But the second picture of the cables in the bag is not a N2K backbone. You'll need a properly powered and terminated backbone (plus a tee) to plug the EasyConnect into. Assuming engine information is provided by whatever you're plugging the EasyConnect into (deutsch connector), then the engine data will be available to the N2K which will plug into a tee on your N2K network. I do not believe you can connect the N2k connector on your EasyConnect directly into your chartplotter's N2K port. I believe you'll have two male connections and they do that because you need the powered and terminated network. Still, it's a better solution than I had when I added this functionality to my Mercruiser system. I had to run a data cable from the engine to the helm, then use the VV4 to act as a gateway to the N2K network then into the chartplotter. VERY interested to see how this works for you. And remember, if you indeed do need to add the N2K system, there's SO much more you can do with that!
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