e-Xtreme

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  1. I've had good luck using a stiff nylon scrub brush with a touch of Simple Green. Don't let the Simple Green sit too long and wash thoroughly.
  2. Chap, if you're listening, I highly recommend you establish a "Level 2" customer support team. For a customer, the initial contact would be with the dealer, but there needs to be a method of escalating an issue directly to the factory. We're buying expensive machines; we expect support, at least for the first few years. It's clear from the posts on this forum that there are some issues some dealers just aren't equipped to handle and a customer just needs to know the factory is there to help. For years, I've owned Toyotas. My initial support comes from the dealer. Toyotas are very solid vehicles and rarely have we had a problem, but a couple of times we've asked the dealer to have the area Toyota representative take a look at an issue and they've responded quickly and with a solution (in one instance, an air conditioning compressor failed at 36,700 miles -- on a 36,000 mile warranty; Toyota stepped in and covered it).
  3. +1 on this. Old engine oil remaining in the block upset a buddy of mine so much that after sucking out the old, he'd add 3 quarts of new oil, let it mix, then suck that out before adding the new oil. We're used to letting that last drop drain from a vehicle's oil pan. Not so on boats. What do you think a dealership does?
  4. I have to ask: What the heck is going on at that factory where these kinds of defects make it through QC?
  5. And if you want even more pain, buy yourself an airplane!!
  6. We used a large crescent wrench to tighten ours. My skinny 16 year old did the dirty work; no way I would have fit! Do yourself a favor and put a few drops of Loctite on the threads before reassembling. Why Chap did not use Loctite in the first place is beyond me -- even though there's a lock washer in place, it's stainless on stainless and doesn't seem to want to grab.
  7. Switch the batteries over -- move #1 to #2 and #2 to #1. If the problem moves with the battery, it's the battery. If not, connections are likely the culprit.
  8. Great boat! I've never once regretted our purchase of the 244. Well, except when I hear someone bought a 264!
  9. So sorry to hear that. My thoughts are with you.
  10. The most dangerous thing I ever saw was a trampoline installed on the bow portion of a pontoon boat -- and four kids jumping on the trampoline with the pontoon boat underway.
  11. Lenco trim tabs make a huge difference in ride through choppy water. Full deflection (bow down) forces the bow down and our 244 cuts through chop well.
  12. There's a disconnect inside the hull. You'll detach the old actuator and pull the wiring through a 1/2" (or so) hole in the transom. You'll attach the replacement actuator and feed the new wires through the hole -- and it's that hole you'll fill liberally with 5200. Budget a couple of hours for the work and a few days to let the 5200 set up prior to using the boat.
  13. Give Lenco a call. They'll sell you a new (single) actuator. It's an easy fix, but you'll need some 5200 to seal the wiring.
  14. Thanks all!! Working on processing the video we shot during the trip.
  15. Sorry to hear of the troubles! Just a note to all: we carry a separate fire extinguisher (large) when towing. It's located in the back of the SUV and NOT ON THE BOAT. After having my brakes overheat last summer, came to the conclusion this would be a wise idea... Last thing I want to do when the trailer's on fire is climb on board the boat to get the extinguisher... that boat also contains 60 gallons of high explosive (aka gasoline). We also carry a cheap handheld infrared thermometer device to measure temps of the rims and bearing caps when we stop for fuel, restrooms, etc. About $20 on Amazon.