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docdixon

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About docdixon

  • Birthday 10/16/1947

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    Orange Beach, Ala

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  1. We moved from coastal NC to coastal Ala. In NC we had inland deep water and plenty of affordable marinas with wet slips for sailboats. In Ala we have shallower inland waters and few affordable wet slip marinas. We live on a canal with easy access to Perdido Bay and the Gulf. Lots of resturants here to get to by power boat quickly. Different lifestyle here. You ever own a sailboat? We love both.
  2. Ditto to what Hatem said. My previous boat was an IP27 and we used Interlux as did many in the marina. Peace
  3. Reading back in this thread you’ll discover that this neighbor is the fellow who felt the tingle on my prop. Not me. There is no tingle now when my prop in in the water. He did have some electrical work done but not sure what. He is selling this boat soon. Hopefully his next sailboat won’t cause a tingle. :-) if so the problem is likely in his dock wiring and lift.
  4. Thanks Iggy and everyone for your insights. Most enlightening to me.
  5. Neighbor's sailboat was out of nearby slip for couple of weeks. During that time there was no current at my prop when I lowered boat into water. When he brought his boat home from the yard, there was no more current at my boat. He did have boat bottom painted and some 'other work.' regardless, the source was. his boat. Hopefully, the new owner will be removing this sailboat this week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry on it's covered lift. Sorry for any confusion. Joe
  6. Update to all who offered information and help. Recently, my neighbor took his sailboat to the yard for a bottom job. Guess what, no more current on my prop! His boat was the source, not mine. Fortunately, he has now sold his boat and it will be removed next week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry. For the curious, his sailboat is wet slipped and is about 100' from mine. My boat is usually stored on my covered lift high and dry. My last boat, an IP27, was wet slipped and the marina had several devices that kept stray current to a minimum and if they ever discover a boat that was 'leaking' current, that boat had to be moved and/or repaired. The marina actually took periodic readings in the water. Very helpful. Thanks again for all the useful commentary and advice. Fair weather, Joe
  7. Thank you. Very useful info. Something I read at Kennedy Yacht Services about Marine electric systems indicated the galvanic isolator could be defective and they suggested ways to test it. Apparently testing is difficult. Replacement is expensive. Anyone know where in engine compartment the galvanic isolator is located in a Chap Sig270? man oh man. This is lots more involved than I’d ever have imagined.
  8. Yes, the electrician said the GFI at main panel protects entire dock, and even if we have flooding at house the 5mA GFI will trip. It has never tripped. Yes, there is a small electrical panel at the dock with four circuits breakers (2 20A and 2 30A). We have shore power (30A), one electrical outlet, and a circuit for lighting. And, color me silly, but I am NOT getting in the water to test for current. If fact, yesterday, it was my neighbor who felt the current while we were re-positioning boat on the lift. I won't ask him to go in again and test it! :-) Also, is a galvanic isolator something that is installed on the boat by Chaparral? Or, is that a device installed when shore power is run to the dock and installed by the electrician?
  9. I found this on the internet about galvanic isolators. I didn't' know what they are. This is informative for me, so I thought I'd share it. Enjoy! "A galvanic isolator is a device used to block low voltage DC currents coming on board your boat on the shore power ground wire. These currents could cause corrosion to your underwater metals; through hulls, propeller, shaft etc. Boats in a marina plugged into shore power all act as a giant battery. They are all connected together by the green shore power ground wire, which is (or should be) connected to their DC grounds, engine block, and bonded underwater metals. If the boats are in salt water then that forms an electrolyte and the dissimilar metals connected together act as a battery, causing corrosion. The galvanic isolator has two pairs of diodes set up so that a voltage of about 1.2 volts is required to cause them to conduct. As most DC voltages caused by galvanic action will be less than this, they are blocked. Good quality isolators also contain a capacitor, which only conducts AC current, as a backup. Normally no AC current is carried on the shore power ground wire, but it has to be able to carry the full load of the circuit in the event of a fault. Therefore it is important to have a good quality unit that will not overheat when required to carry the rated load. Some heat will be generated by the voltage drop and the unit must be able to withstand this."
  10. Wow. I have learned a lot from you guys! Thanks, and for the insights and the diagram. The marine certified electrician will be here today to test the system. Just to clarify - the boat is new. Shore power on board is by Chaparral. When I said electrician installed the shore power, I meant at the new dock. Also, the GFI is 5 milliamperes threshold and it all way up at the house, where the power is connected to a new panel. That is where I test the GFI, and when I do, all power to the dock is terminated. Once terminated, only way to test for current on the props is get in the water and touch the props. We'll try that today, I imagine. IF there is still current, then it's the boat. Will advise, and thanks again!
  11. Roger that Hatem. Chap dealer mechanic said no way is this the boat. Electrician who installed shore power and lift said mild current at prop is not voltage leakage from shore power. We have a 5 milliamperes GFI in the dock. He advised there are so many grounded transformers on our island that we have in effect created a battery. So when person is grounded in salt water on sandy bottom, and touches the metal outdrive which is the ground for the boat, and there’s current in boats system you’ll feel a mild tingle. Nothing to worry about. We shut off all power to boat dock and still felt current, unless we turned all boat batteries off. Then no tingle. Hmmm. Way above my pay grade.
  12. Ok, Roger that, Hatem. I'll look forward to your in-water test results for current at prop. Chap243, I can try today see if current is present with shore power off. Yesterday, we turned both batteries OFF, and the current stopped. Shore power was still ON with no current at prop with batteries OFF. SO, this makes me think the current at the prop was from the boat's batteries. Still, not sure what that means. Thanks guys!! /Joe
  13. No, if you mean 'weren't anchored' to indicate the boat's anchor. Boat was on the lift, high and dry, shore power was ON and so were both main engine battery and house battery switches. I read elsewhere that this is part of the corrosion protection system. I have a General Class FCC license and am knowledgable about electricity, but can't really understand how a mild, low voltage, low amp current would prevent corrosion, ie, electrolysis from 'stray current.' A steady flow through the outdrive would render the outdrive somewhat if not completely impervious to stray current from elsewhere that would slowly remove metal from the outdrive and props through electrolysis. Right? This lift is at my house, and there are no other boats nearby as in a marina. One boat at perhaps 50' distance is neighbor's boat that is in the water and on shore power. Unlikely there is 'stray current' from my lift's motors, because the boat sits on rubber ramps (part of the boat lift) and this provides insulation. Right? Thanks for the comments. Much appreciated.
  14. I have a 2016 SIG270 with Volvo Penta dual prop. Today, while working on boat we noticed a definite electric current in the prop when touched. The boat had main engine and house batteries ON, but the boat was out of the water on it's lift. We were in water standing on sandy bottom. Is it normal for there to be an electric current in the props and outdrive? We turned main engine and house batteries OFF, and electric current stopped. Normally we store boat out of water on lift with all batteries OFF. Is the small electric current part of the corrosion protection system? All the anodes on boat are in good condition. Thanks, Joe
  15. Bryon - Thanks for the heads up on the LED lights in the speakers. We've not had the boat out at night so have never seen this. I LIKE this feature. I love little blue LED lights that let me know things are working. Also heard from Joe Celano at Cecil Marine. He said he thought this speaker might still be under warranty and he'll check into that. If so, he offered to refund my payment and I'll send him the defective speaker. Now, he did this without my asking, so I consider this the highest level of customer service anyone could expect. Very thoughtful. So, naturally, in the future ALL my boating purchase will be with my new friends at Cecil Marine. I highly recommend them, and especially Joe Celano!! Thanks again, Joe. Joe Dixon
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