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Roady68

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About Roady68

  • Birthday 07/28/1968

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    t_crowe_rr@hotmail.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Aurora, NY
  • Interests
    60s Muscle cars, motorcycles, fire arms and boating.

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  1. 30 year on the Sundancer 400 would be like buying a house. But it depreciates. We checked out the 400 and its isn't much smaller than our first house, lol. Well not quite.
  2. So the other day at lunch I watched YouTube videos from Carver, Crownline, Maxum and others on factory tours and building boats. One thing I can say is that the process, even today, looks to be very labor intensive. And its skilled labor too. If its like some of the other trades, skill labor costs have increased as there is a shortage. We spent so many years telling everyone that they have to go to college and get a degree that the numbers entering the skilled trades have dwindled. I see fiberglass body guys, cabinet makers, electricians, plumbers, etc in everyone of these factory tour videos. That may be one of the largest drivers of costs. I'd really like to see cost stack of a typical boat build (materials, labor, overhead, etc.).
  3. Hmmm. Maybe its both theories that Yogi presents. Smaller demand for most segments, therefore costs have to be amortized over fewer units resulting in higher prices. But could be that financing is allowing another market segment to get into boats with long term financing. I agree 20 year isn't a stretch. I see 20 year notes on nice used boats up around here. And if I heard the dealer correctly, they thought they could get a 30 year on one of the big Sundancer (35'). So maybe manufacturers are trying to squeeze out as much from the small boat segment now while banks are willing to loan money on them at terms that don't make sense. This seems to look a lot like some of the bubbles that have popped in the past in the world of finance.
  4. I see a lot of innovation in boating. Mainly in the electronics and engine systems. However, I think some of that innovation is coming at a cost that is passed on to the consumer. Upgraded engine management system(fuel injection, monitoring, smart phone apps, etc), are definitely one area that has changed in the last 10 to 15 years. However, unlike a Ford F150 where the development and fixed costs can be spread across 500,000 units a year (just the F150 sales mind you), Manufactures have far fewer units to be able to adsorb those costs. Now, does it explain why a Mercruiser 5.7 with Bravo 3 outdrive costs $30k? Not sure. Or why a 30' Chaparral cruiser (no longer made, I know), is basically doubled in comparable dollars in less than 20 years? Probably not.
  5. Definitely a factor too. I heard a podcast saying that guaranteed student loan program and reforms done in early 90s led to colleges charging more for tuition. They know that they can get it because its coming out of the governments pocket, not the student's. So they can get more. And if student fails out or can't repay, the debt isn't removed in cases of bankruptcy (thank you US government) so banks will lend to higher risks.
  6. On windy days we lower all the eisenglass and roll up as much canvas as possible. It helps, but there is a lot of surface area on these things.
  7. I'd probably buy new if the costs didn't outpace growth and inflation. My Sig 300 came out in 1998. Chaparral carried the same design for I think six years. According to boat test magazine articles, a Sig 300 comparably equipped to mine was about $92k. In today's dollars, that is about $155k. I don't think you could get the 270 today for that. Maybe, but its not a twin and its three feet smaller in length. I know there are more features on today's boats that cost more. Like cars that have airbags, back up cameras, etc, the boating industry has made a lot of niceties standard. Maybe the business people at the boat manufacturers know that the demand for higher price results in fewer units sold. Therefore, need to raise price to make same margin. But it can spiral. And I think that is what happened to the Signature 310 and 330. I would have thought there could be some innovation in the boating world that would reduce costs (materials, automation, computer design, etc) that would keep costs down and provide suitable margins at lower prices. But looking at the construction of today's boats, not much has changed in 30 or 40 years for the general population of manufacturers.
  8. Add a 5 mph current perpendicular to the slip too. That is what I deal with. I am getting the hang of it but not a pro by any means
  9. Roady68

    Preemptive Replacement of Manifolds and Risers

    On my Sig 300, I have the removable floor panels, not a hatch, so easy access to engine bay once I pull them. And I find the older 300W work lights provide not only light, but some nice heat too.
  10. Roady68

    Preemptive Replacement of Manifolds and Risers

    No, I haven't ordered them yet. My toy funding doesn't come until beginning of March. I have to have the port engine lower drive looked at. The oil drain plugs are corroded solid. I ended up replacing starboard lower when I screwed up the case trying to remove. I may have a shop do the other one. The ad from when I bought my boat said the risers and manifolds were replaced two seasons before. The guy didn't have receipts but some other stuff he said checked out. I may try to get another season out of them. Current best price I could find is $900 per engine for Mercury parts and $600 for Sierra. For next winter I may do what you said and have the boat towed to my house for winter storage. We just had a few large trees come down this winter so I should be able to get it through the drive way. Our old boat was an 8' beam and that was very tight. I wouldn't even try to get a 10' beam boat up the driveway. I hated to see 150 year old maples come down, but mother nature decided it was time. Anyway, I am thinking shrink wrapping with a door and parking it next to garage. I may be able to get to some other repairs I've been wanting to do too.
  11. Roady68

    It never changes.

    My favorite was the affirmation that we shall not become a socialist country. i hope that holds true.
  12. Roady68

    Replacing the fuel water separator

    Also be careful about spilling the fuel. This maintenance task has been the basis for several boat fires int he past.
  13. Roady68

    Preemptive Replacement of Manifolds and Risers

    Uncanny timing. I didn't have a chance to do the manifold work as I damaged my lower outdrive case on the starboard engine. That pretty much ate up my time and budget. I am starting to compile a list of things to do for 2019 season so this is back. We had no cooling issues last year, so I think I am probably OK, but curiosity is getting to me.
  14. Roady68

    2017 Signature 310 Trailer

    Yep. I think that's the best setup also.
  15. Roady68

    F150 going electric?

    Tesla is using the GM/Toyota factory that was shuttered a few years back. If I recall, it was a pretty new facility.
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