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SG Boater

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About SG Boater

  • Birthday 08/14/1964

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ste. Genevieve, MO
  • Interests
    Boating

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  1. SG Boater

    Props: How They're Made

    I didn't watch the whole video so didn't realize they showed putting the blades on the hub. Sorry for pointing out something you knew. We build valves and other products for the pneumatic trailer industry. Not very glamorous, but the development process is still interesting. For all I know, they might be able to 3-D print with wax now. I know they've developed printers that can actually print metal. It's no longer just prototypes either. Printings now can be made with enough structural integrity to be used in production. I know a guy whose son set up a 3-D printing operation in CA. One of his clients was/is Tesla. He was producing interior components Tesla uses in their cars. Due to low volume, cheaper to have him print than create the mold.
  2. SG Boater

    Props: How They're Made

    You are right in that one mold can spit out a bunch of waxes which are then used for the ceramic mold. But that is somewhat the case for other types of molding as well. For example in sand casting, you have one mold and press it into sand to make an impression. Molten metal is then poured into the sand "mold" and as the molten metal cools the sand molds are run through a shaker and the sand molds breaks apart and falls off leaving your cast part. This method wouldn't produce parts near the quality of investment casting however, plus other limitations. I don't know if you noticed this, but the waxes used to make the ceramic molds in that video are not molded as a single piece. There is not a mold of the entire prop which produces a wax prop. The barrel, or hub is one wax piece and the wax blades are molded separately and affixed to the hub to then make the wax version of a prop, which is then used to make the ceramic mold. In the video, notice the black at the base of the blades. This is where it's glued or somehow affixed to the hub. This has to do with the geometry of the part being cast. The mold has to come apart for the molded part (wax in this case) to be ejected. With all the negative drafts, curvatures and complex geometry of a prop, there is no way to mold it in one piece and get it out of the mold. This is another advantage of investment casting, once you have the wax made, you simply break the ceramic mold to get the part out, and putting wax pieces together to make one part allows you to make a very complicated wax mold. It also allows experimentation. For example, if they wanted to see how a 7 blade prop would work, they'd simply affix 7 blades to the hub in a wax state, then go on with the process. Since this interests you, here is something I find fascinating. With the advancements in solid, or 3-D, printing, you can create virtually anything in 3-D engineering software, print out a plastic prototype, then use it as your "Wax" and investment cast it. When the ceramic is cured in a kiln, the plastic 3-D printing melts and runs out. We have proto-typed several new products this way. Eliminates the need to create a real mold for each step in development of a new product. In the end, investment casting produces a much better part, but it is a labor intensive and drawn out process. But for some things, it's the only way. And it does interest me, one of the funnest things I've done at my job is visit foundries of all types. FYI, we get some components from a die cast foundry. They do aluminum, zinc and bronze. Lots of zinc marine components and they produce bronze inboard props. I assume inboard props don't have as complex geometry like lots of rake and cupping that allow them to be die cast.
  3. SG Boater

    Stowing bimini top - '04 210ssi

    Mine is a taylormade. I have an '05 210. For travel mine lays on the sunpad. I would imagine it would lay on the engine cover on yours since I believe you have the back to back front seats with jump seats on either side of the engine cover. When we get to where we're going, I put it in the radar arch position. It's out of the way, and can be deployed in about 30 seconds. I assume you have the rear legs so that yours can be in the radar arch position when underway. I wouldn't tow this way though.
  4. SG Boater

    Props: How They're Made

    Another interesting thing about investment casting is that anything that will melt or burn off during the baking/curing of the ceramic can be used as the "mold". I was at one of our foundries and the owner had a collection of ss investment castings, a ring cast from a plastic spider ring out of a coin operated gumball machine, a baseball, and a couple of other things I can't recall. Wax is used because its easy to work with, plentiful, and they know it's shrink rate so the original tool can be made such that the dimensions of the final piece can be tightly controlled.
  5. SG Boater

    Props: How They're Made

    Although they can spit the waxes out pretty quick, the entire investment casting process is not faster. In fact, it can take several days for the cycle. One tool (or mold) is used to create all the waxes which then have to set up. Then the ceramic coating is applied in multiple steps by dipping and allowed to cure between steps before the final baking of the ceramic. When the ceramic is baked, the wax melts and runs out leaving the ceramic shell into which the SS is poured. The investment casting (or lost wax) process is much more accurate with tolerances held to a few ".001 and the finish will be much better than sand casting which is the other common form of casting SS. Where I work we do most of our SS components using investment casting, some are sand cast. Many of our aluminum castings are die cast. That method creates a part in about 20 seconds, though die casting has it's limitations, most notably strength because the material has lots of porosity due to being injected under pressure.
  6. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    It's great when it works right, and about the only way we can drain ours fairly easily with the 210's limited access. In perfect world I'd be more comfortable with just removing the blue plugs and ensuring the drain holes aren't plugged and everything is draining. With it all together, no way to know if everything is drained. Due to limited access, I will likely keep it in there and see if I can access the quick disconnects to make sure it's all drained each fall.
  7. SG Boater

    210 SS Capacity??

    I wonder why they lowered the capacity. Same boat with a different dash and slightly different seat and sunpad cushions to allow the walk over? With that being said, no way I'd want 12, or even 10 in mine. However the 210 does have a fairly open layout which is why I went with it. It fits 8 pretty easily, much better than most 20 - 22 footers. On our couples weekend 8 adults and a couple full size coolers and we still weren't cramped at all. We were basically just cruising from cove to cove, then would get out the Lily Pad and lounge in the water. But we had more space than the other boat with us, a 19' Caravelle with "L" shaped seating and a side walk-through, and they only had 4 with a cooler. The 210 bow is pretty long so easy for a couple adults to stretch out up there. Now if we couldn't use the bow, we'd have been cramped.
  8. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    when I winterize this fall I will take out the interior because i will also be replacing bellows and shift cable. So it will be easy to get to the distribution housing at that time. It is the actual valve that it's not shutting off, no crack in the housing which I'm seeing is fairly common. I'm sure it's just a grommet or o-ring in there, but can't find it separately, they want to sell the whole plastic distribution housing. If in fact that drain line is secure, I think a plug or valve in the drain line is a suitable fix rather than forking out 200 deer for the the housing. But I can't see that on my boat till I have back seat out.
  9. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    Bt Doctur, where does the "rod" seal in your cut away image. I assumed there was an o-ring or grommet in there. Hatem, If the orange drain line is held securely onto the distribution housing, I will likely do just what you said, leave the expanding plug in there or add a length of hose and a valve. Seems like the distribution housings like to crack/split sooner or later anyhow. But I was only able to see with a mirror and it appears the orange drain line is simply pushed onto a flared outlet, not that secure. Will be able to check it out this fall when everything is apart. At that time I'll look further into fabricating a replacement for the plastic parts. At this point I'm just trying to see all my options and have anything I can get in advance, particularly if it's small $ items, like what I assumed I could use to fix the actual seal, ie. o-ring or grommet.
  10. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    So, no one has ever replaced the seal in the distribution housing itself? If that's possible, I'd like to get the stuff in advance so have my options in front of me when I winterize this fall. I'd really like to get rid of the single point drain system, but I'll need to see how my access is to all the plugs before making that decision.
  11. SG Boater

    210 SS Capacity??

    The bench is plenty wide for 4 adults to sit comfortably, 5 isn't really too bad. We generally had 4 on the bench. At one point all 4 women were in the bow, but that was getting tight. 2 in bow is ideal, and if one doesn't mind sitting backwards with back against bow cushion, plenty of room for 3.
  12. SG Boater

    210 SS Capacity??

    Interesting that your capacity plate is 1660 lbs. the capacity plate on my '05 210 states 10 people or 1405 lbs. I guess those SSI emblems weigh a lot, or maybe they think people are skinnier now. Pretty sure the weight capacity is just people/gear and fluids/fuel/battery already accounted for. If not, I wouldn't be able to put much in my boat. To put your mind at ease, we took a long weekend couples trip at the end of June, had 8 adults in our boat when cruising. With people and coolers we were at the 1405, probably slightly over at the start of the day when coolers were full, and it performed great. It did take an extra second or two to get on plane, but it felt steady as a rock, handled waves great and pretty much handled the same as with 2 or 3 in there. Did run an 18 pitch 4 blade vs. my usual 20 pitch.
  13. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    Right now I can't really even see any of that in my 210, all down below the engine and behind the seat. When i dis-assemble the interior this fall I'll be able to trace the hose routings, etc and this should make more sense. Downside is removing the single point drain system will pretty much force me to take apart the interior each fall, can't get to where the blue plugs are with everything in place. At least I can't, not that flexible.
  14. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    Sorry, it's on a Merc, 5.0 MPI. Bt doctur, I assume the 4 hose connector you reference is the one below the engine. I think one of the lines from the distribution housing (gray in your pic above) goes to that 4 hose connector. I'm going by memory, and that's not a very clear memory because i didn't look at it much. Are you saying replace the 4 hose connector and distribution housing with one fabricated from brass fittings?
  15. SG Boater

    Single Point Drain System Leak

    No one has ever had the sealing components fail and fixed?
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