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Curt

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Everything posted by Curt

  1. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    I use one, but my setup doesn’t have the swivel and has about 10 inches of chain available to clamp onto. I drilled the clevis pin to add safety wire to keep it from backing out. I also added a coated multi-strand cable between the anchor and chain so if the attachment point breaks the anchor still comes up.
  2. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Same here. But, if the thing fails, I’m hand over hand instead of the wrench. Faster.
  3. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Agree. Plus, it’s faster if the motor fails to do it to “ole fashioned” way... hand over hand.
  4. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    +1 Denny. That as well.
  5. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Great approach. If you get “backed” into mounting it as kicked back and forth, a ratchet can be used with the star-bit. Not perfect, but it’s really not meant to haul the anchor all the way up but instead to clear a jamb.
  6. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    I’d go with relief holes in the seat backing.
  7. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Yeah, I see that hole. Who knows why it’s there or what they were thinking. At any rate, a suggestion. Use a backing plate on the seat side or real large fender washers. Bolting through the fiberglass, but not having some kind of backing should be avoided. Keep up the great work. It looks great.
  8. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Looks great.
  9. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    If the sandpaper route is desired, unless attempting to get the bigger gouges out, start at 2000 and move up because the part is already polished. Starting lower will matte/dull the surface and more work will be needed to bring the brilliance back. Likewise, if a compound is used, an oil wetted cotton cloth or copper wool is preferred. Basically, apply with something softer than the stainless otherwise it will mar the surface.
  10. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Suggest Timesaver's lapping compound. https://www.ws2coating.com/timesaverlappingcompounds/. The Yellow 60N is a good start. Then go to 80N or even 100N. Green works very good as well, but is a little more aggressive. Either way, mix with a little light oil and use a high speed drill and flapper wheel. For the crevices and/or more intricate areas, a Dremel and flapper wheel. After, clean with an aerosol window cleaner, kerosene or MEK, then apply and buff with a little auto wax (serves as a good protectant/sealer). The compound breaks down as you go, so you'll need to reload the wheel from time to time. I have tins of both, and can send some of each in two small plastic containers if you'd prefer not to order. Nearly any standard home silver or stainless polish works pretty good also. And, I've used SoftScrub from time to time as well. Like with any compound though, suggest testing a very small area first to make sure it doesn't alter the brilliance of the surface.
  11. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    5200 is available in black. I’ll send a rec. on a suitable compound separately.
  12. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Looks real good. Not sure it’s worth the effort to bend further because the guide will have to come off and be rewelded. If plated, with those bends on the press, the chrome would likely have cracked, chipped or flaked. Chrome is very rigid, and doesn’t “bend” well. The bead sure is bad, wow, but does look plated to me. Not there, so can’t be certain. FYI. You’d be surprised how well these things polish out, and it’s possible they started with a mill polished plate (single side). A variety of flapper wheels, and even a vibratory media tank do wonders. But, I don’t think this latter method was used because all surfaces would be the same. If you work the hull, and use a rubber gasket/liberal amount of 5200, she’ll look good and be water tight. Looks like the best next step.
  13. Curt

    Stainless Manifolds and tubes

    Yes. A handful of suggestions follow. Check mating surfaces. They need to be clean of debris, corrosion, etc. This is usually accomplished with a wire brush and emery cloth. If real bad but internal passages are good, they can be re-decked (surface milled; just a skim cut if you will) (about any auto machine shop can do it; small $). Use new bolts and a two or three stage torque regimen in the prescribed alternating pattern. Apply a brush width patch of anti-seize about an quarter inch above max. insertion depth. This keeps water from penetrating deep and freezing the bolt in place. Chase all threads with a tap, then clean all debris out with compressed air or shop vac and snout. A reminder... I don't know how much leakage you have and only have the static photo to go from. Setting that, the stainless debate and whether I'd reuse as-is aside, Cyclops and you are both on point with disassembly and inspection. It's easy, and if you don't like what you see, you can then move to replacement. No real wasted time or effort, and your mind will be at ease whether used another season or replaced. Best wishes.
  14. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Good news, sounds like it's polished. While you can plate only certain surfaces, it's harder and more costly. Given the typical save $0.05 approach most builders live by, if this thing was plated, it'd be plated on all sides - easier and cheaper. Talk with Viking, but they look to have a wonderful aluminum competency. Stainless is different. Agree. But, a suggestion that is more of a helpful requirement. Make sure the shop has an "alloy gun" so they can determine what type of stainless this thing is made from. Knowing the type and grade is very important to a successful weld. The rod and filler must be compatible or there will be problems. If they don't have one, no biggie, drive over to any decent size scrap dealer/processor and sweet talk the counter person into testing it for you. Takes less than a minute. If you bring that pizza, I'm sure they'll help. On both of these points, don't worry or let it get you down. It's going to distort some and nothing can be done about that. But, and this is good, any and all distortion will be removed by heat, that largish hammer and skilled hand. Once polished, again, you'll be the only one, other than those on this board following this discussion, aware of what was done and the fact it distorted at all. The key here, take the time to create that template. Then, take that template and transfer it to a large cross section hard wood timber. Make a base form that can be hammered against (think of it as a wood anvil). When you've got the contour just how you want it, burn the surface some to harden it and hammer it some to compress things (yes, leave some stock and "finish contour" it via hammering, followed by burning). Then take this baby, along with that plate, to the shop of your choice. They'll love you. They'll love the fact you're into it. They'll love that you're helpful. And, they'll love you more by paying cash with cash in hand. At any rate, ignoring the flowery bromance that is sure to blossom, they'll use it to hammer that beauty into shape using this "one-time" base. Easy peasy. You got this. No worries.
  15. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Is it chrome plated or polished? Seems like a dumb question, but many are platted because stainless is a very grainy material. No memory per se, but stainless is harder than h-e-double hockey sticks and is very difficult to weld and tends to distort. Pre-heating is required get the weld to “stick”. Assuming polished, polish, polish, polish. Lots of labor. Love the template idea. At the end of the day, if you want to use the existing part, an oxy-acetylene torch, a tempering oven, a heavy hammer, wood timber base and skilled hand will do the trick. Two things to think about. Call the manufacturer and get the grade of steel used. This will help the shop doing the work a lot. Second, perhaps they’ll make you a custom, using the template, and also take this one back provided you give them some extra $. They are equipped to do this. If that doesn’t work, PM me and I’ll provide a few references for shops that do great stainless work. Alternatively, and fortunately you’re in the Boston area, go to a few stainless prop repair shops - they’ll have the equipment and skill for this. Keep in mind, stainless is a material many general metal shops can’t do (and readily admit) and/or some think they can do, but in the end can’t (part looks terrible, weld is awful, etc.; remember, the weld must bond the pieces together structurally and must also look great - this is an appearance part). Can’t wait to see this finished. It looks great, and the work you’ve done is fantastic. Also, can’t wait to see the bow thruster.
  16. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Great, great job, and a 2nd on the big ___hole. Have you thought about sealing the cut out with something? Looks fairly porous, but pictures can be deceiving.
  17. Curt

    I am sick.

    +1, and a fine blade with steady guide pressure. Don’t force the cut, let the saw do it.
  18. Curt

    Stainless Manifolds and tubes

    Recall, none of us have knowledge of quantity leaking or visual of your bilge. Only you do. Based on the posted pictures, and considering age, it’s great and I don’t get all hubbub regarding stainless. (Also, not poking you here, but a header and manifold are different. A header is generally used with a different objective in mind.). Yes, if at that age and that minor, I’d go another season and reassess. I’d also replace with cast Volvo Penta. FWIW, the small leakage looks more like uneven torque, or a little heat induced warpage. Don’t attempt to retorque now. It will get worse. Congrats on Red Sox.
  19. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Yep, when as close as your’s is. Another way is the angle and height of the swim platform.
  20. Can’t see anything on the pic. Rule of thumb is replace when about 50% remaining.
  21. Curt

    Windless anchor for a 276 ssx

    Great prep. Hope the hole goes well.
  22. Curt

    Stainless Manifolds and tubes

    Aluminum heats up the same, just gets there and dissipates faster. It’s vastly more thermally and electrically conductive. Cast iron, though, holds heat longer (a heat sink). Aluminum is a reactive metal. It corrodes, more so in salt water, and especially when dissimilar metals are involved (whether yours or what’s nearby). The corrosion takes the form of a white skin (which, when significant, complete and quickly developed, is actually a barrier to further corrosion) often with a bit of a powdery appearance and feel. You’ll need to watch the anodes, and may need to change the type. In addition, given you’re splashed at a marina, in salt, neighboring slips, boats, types of metals, shorepower and electrical leakage all become more relevant and part of the success (or failure) equation. Aluminum is more reactive than iron, steel, bronze, etc. It’s all been considered by the manufacturer, thus the 5 year warranty vs. lifetime (where common knowledge and thought would suggest aluminum and stainless should be lifetime). Your call. P.S. What’s depicted by the picture looks normal. Assuming no leaks, if they flush clean and there’s no solid debris, replacement is premature and another season to three is expected. Also, current generation VP’s are all aluminum, including exhaust manifolds, risers, etc. Lighter but also eliminates the dissimilar metals problem.
  23. Curt

    Stainless Manifolds and tubes

    His point about dissimilar metals is good and accurate. I’d stay with the OEM. You know what the performance has been, and therefore will be. Actual life is unknown on the stainless/aluminum option. Could be better, could be worse. Won’t know until some point in the future, and before then you might catch 2 to 3-foot (or more) itis.
  24. An adjustable pin spanner wrench will remove it, as will a large channel lock and rag. When the rubber o-ring is compressed, actually over tightened, it bites-in and holds both the top and bottom like a lock. Hard to breakaway without the proper tool. It’s not corroded, so penetrating oil won’t work. A wide flat screwdriver and mallet may break it loose, but damage will likely result. With a spanner and a 6 to 8 inch extension tube over the handle, this is much easier (better leverage). When reinstalling, turn and tighten until the o-ring meets the tank, and the make an additional 1/4 turn.
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