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Curt

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Everything posted by Curt

  1. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    Yeah, there’s something odd with that engine. Driving me a bit nuts. Thanks for clarifying Hatem. Makes more sense than how I was reading it.
  2. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    Nope. Sorry. Hey, dumb question. Does Hatem mean hate ‘em all?
  3. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    No worries Hatem, I understand ya. The reservoir on a V8-320-C-B is different than those two pics. So is the heat exchanger.
  4. Curt

    Oil/foam dripping from outdrive

    What body of water is that? I've never seen such a cool color and clarity. Beautiful. Best wishes with the repair. It'll be good as-new.
  5. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    I'm stumped. No reservoir. I'll do some more digging over the next few days. This doesn't change troubleshooting. Again, though, there is an oddity with the engine product number and serial number. Unlike the transom assembly and outdrive, whose numbers are valid and tie-out in all respects, the engine serial number and product number don't. This could be a simple manufacturing oversight, or the plastic cover and sticker don’t go with this engine, or there were a few units with undocumented production. No idea. No need for alarm. Just a bit odd.
  6. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    Thank you for the picture. Not sure. One of two things. Either this sticker doesn't have the coolant information like model years that follow do, or I have bad information. When you're at the boat, please look so we know 100% for sure. The reservoir on a V8-320-C-B has a sticker also. Just noticed something else. None of the numbers on the engine tag come up in Volvo Penta's documentation (serial number, product number, etc. -- although, V8-320-C-B is valid). The transom and drive unit tags are good and tie out, but something isn't right with the engine tag. I'll try to get to the bottom of this, but may not be able to. It doesn't change troubleshooting, at least at present. Is the boat in salt or freshwater? Something else to check, which may require jumping in the water, make sure the intakes on the lower unit are clear and not clogged/plugged with algae, muscles, trash, etc. They are black, about 1.5 inches wide and 2 or 3 inches tall. They look like plastic, but they're not. One the port side, there are two silver flat bolt heads. If you don't know where they are, I'll post a pic. How did you get the code? As to your last post, a V8-320-C-B is a combination. The open side is freshwater/seawater (raw water), while the other is closed and uses antifreeze. The two fluids don't meet/mingle, but go through a common heat exchanger where the raw water cools the antifreeze via the non-contact exchange of thermal energy. The closed side is pressurized (which uses the antifreeze), and also includes the thermostat. The raw water (freshwater/seawater), after going through the heat exchanger, is discharged through the exhaust where it also cools the exhaust - it's a single pass system - once through and back in the lake/ocean/river. The antifreeze recirculates over and over in the engine until a few years go by and it's time to change it.
  7. Great idea W. The unknowns, at present, given spark, distributor, sensors, wiring, etc. have been confirmed, include are these cylinders working but working weakly or are they dead. Based on the original post, it appears working properly then something happened to reduce or eliminate power on the port bank. On the 5.0 MPI Volvo Penta of the same vintage, there are two ignition modules - one for each side. Is the Mercury a single? I'm also thinking we need to dust off and do a compression test. Granted, I don't believe this is the culprit, it's time to rule-in or out.
  8. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    Thank you. Your motor is best thought of as a hybrid, and is cooled by an "open" and "closed" side (together, the cooling system). There is a raw water pump (some call it seawater, others freshwater, etc.) on the open side. This side of the system brings in raw water from the lake/ocean, circulates it through one side of the heat exchanger and discharges through the exhaust. This pump has the nitrile/rubber impeller you changed. This side of the system, in addition to pulling heat from the closed side, is what keeps the exhaust cool so those parts don't melt and alarms sound. The engine is cooled by the closed side, and has a reservoir on top/to the side of the engine. The coolant should be yellow if the original Volvo Penta fill. This coolant (antifreeze) is circulated through the block, heads, etc. by the circulating pump driven from the crank. It also goes through the other side of the heat exchanger where it is cooled (non-contact) by the raw water. Please double check. The Volvo Penta V8-320-C-B is as described above. Thank you for the additional information. Behind the impeller is a sealed bearing, and seal. When they fail, the shaft gets progressively loose and this allows air to leak and break prime, and water to drip or stream out. Either way, flow is less and interrupted. The telltale signs of impending failure is often a grease spay perpendicular to the crank (a black, black/gray streak); small rubber bits and crumbs, etc.; a water drip or stream; discoloration of the pump cover, etc. Also, if the shaft wiggles (with the impeller out), it's failed or on its way. With multiple overheats, the bearing and/or seal are probably suspect. This, if confirmed, means replace the pump. Regarding the impeller, the damage often doesn't jump off the page. Sometimes it's on the ends, which must seal on the pump endplates. With an overheat, or multiple overheats, this rib often becomes deformed, yet appears normal at first glance. Look at each end real close. The rib should be "sharp/crisp looking" (because it's molded in). If it's shinny or wavy, it's been damaged. The vanes generally take more heat before they become "damaged" (deformed, melted, etc.). Please take another look. As you know, these are pretty inexpensive and don't take long to remove and replace. Might just be best to start fresh. Sorry, I don't know. I want to say yes, but I guess it depends if the drive is up and how clear and still the surrounding water is. I don't know what you mean by top. It should be located below the catalytic and elbow assembly, on top of the manifold, toward the transom. Finally, stick with what Wingnut first posted. Not enough volume of raw water (a.k.a. seawater/freshwater).
  9. Curt

    Does the galley refrigerator have a drain?

    Well said. Agree fully.
  10. Curt

    check engine code SPN-1386 FMI-15 CNT-4

    On the Volvo Penta, the engine protection mode kicks in at 200-F for engine coolant and 160-F for exhaust manifold. These are also the alarm set-points. As Wingnut pointed out, the issue is likely too little water flow to/from the raw water pump. (a) Check the belt and pulley, the flush port to ensure the cap is tight and not leaking air, look under the pump to confirm there is no leak or debris (grease, rubber flakes, etc.). With the flush port connected to a hose (follow the directions in your manual when doing this), make sure water is flowing freely from the lower unit with the engine off. Given the alarm only occurs when loaded, there's no point running the engine on the flush port. (b) Also, check to ensure the coolant reservoir level is between the min/max. (c) If all is proper, visually inspect the sensor on each manifold for damage, wiring for chafing, cuts, etc.. Pull each plug-in, check the pins to ensure they are straight and tight, reseat, etc. If you have time, please post the year, and complete model number for the engine and whether salt or freshwater. The engine model number should be either V8-320-__ or V8-320-__-__ for a 2015. The code indicates high exhaust temperature, 4 times.
  11. Curt

    Vessel View Mobile

    Kudos to Mercury Marine x2. The way it should be. Volvo Penta on the other hand will only say, please call an authorized dealer. I have no problem supporting the dealer, but there are things that don't require trip after trip after trip. Kudos again to Mercury Marine.
  12. Curt

    Does the galley refrigerator have a drain?

    Wow. Glad you caught and corrected both areas. I guess their motto is out of sight doesn’t matter. Who would leave holes like that. Unreal.
  13. Dozer. I'm unable to find the manual for your particular engine/year combination, but found this one that is close and covers your serial number albeit 1-year later. Please look at Page 31 for a description of audible alarms. It suggests checking the outdrive oil level. This will not put the engine into protect mode. I'll try to send via PM since the site won't post due to size. As to the issue at hand, the ECT is located at the thermostat housing and it also appears there are two pressure senders on either side of the thermostat. Given the work history and diagnostic efforts to-date, this is where I would focus, assuming oil pressure is ruled out. Reseat each terminations, check the pins, look for chaffed wires, might even swap them one at a time from the starboard engine. If the problem still occurs after ruling out all of the preceding, the condition is real and is not within the electric side of things.
  14. Thank you Wingnut. Just confirmed this as well.
  15. Again, I'm not a Mercury expert but their respective EFI systems have some similarities with the same aim of efficiency and protection. ECT is the engine coolant temperature sensor. On Volvo Penta's of a similar year, there is 1 sensor that kills 4-fuel injectors under certain conditions when engine protect mode is engaged, the ECT. In addition, there are 2 sensors that kill spark to 4-cylinders when engine protect mode is engaged, the exhaust temperature and oil pressure. Thank you for clarifying. You've confirmed there's spark. What we don't know is whether you problem is caused by killing 4-injectors or killing spark to 4-cylinders. This is where the scan tool is quicker because what the engine is being doing can be seen. At the same time, there is a way to test each one by one and based on the result (what the engine does), narrow the issue. Again, sorry, I'm not a Mercury expert. I believe with any MPI (a.k.a. EFI) engine, though, the system needs input from the exhaust system (at least Volvo Penta's of the same vintage do). Perhaps on a Mercury this sensor is not included or not located on the manifolds. I don't know. Wingnut will. This is significant. Glad you recalled this. The system is shouting out two things. First, what triggered or that engine protect mode was triggered (engine temp., exhaust temp. and/or oil pressure). The original loud alarm. Second (a.k.a.), a code was present. It's basically an audible FYI. If engine protect mode was active, the loud steady alarm would sound. (Again, sorry, this how Volvo Penta's does it. There are similarities, for sure, but also some differences.) I'm with and you and feel the same. In lieu of, look to see if there is any sign of leakage (e.g. not torqued, gasket blow-by, etc.). If none, I doubt it's compression. Don't give up, you are closer than you think to solving... just in the "trough" at the moment. Take a breath, give it a day perhaps, but you are close. Yes, a scan tool would allow almost immediate gratification (the solution), but you've practically rounded 3rd and home plate is insight. Wingnut posted a site that has Mercury parts and schematics. I'll find it and see if an exhaust temperature sensor can be confirmed and a few other things. In the meantime, consider two things. First, we've not discussed oil pressure. Is it good, right weight oil and type, not over/under filled, etc.? Second, given everything you've described, it seems there's a bad ECT or its wiring is chaffed or one/both terminations aren't fully seated or there are damaged pins. Yes, I need to confirm if there's an exhaust temperature sensor as well. Working on it.
  16. Not real high. I'm sure you know this, but just in case, some auto parts stores "rent" certain tools for free. I was doing the rear brakes on my Son's vehicle a few months ago, and didn't have the tool to spin the parking brake ball screw back into the caliper pocket. Went up to O'Reilly to purchase or rent one. Learned they "rent" them for free. I bought the pads from the dealer, but when I took the tool back, I ordered a set of NGK iridium spark plugs and purchased a few other things. Interesting way to drive traffic. At any rate, It'll be interesting to see the results. Either way, this will help isolate the issue. Can't help with this - I'm not there able to listen. I sure would want to identify the sound though, even if it meant getting a buddy to work the key. The ECT will kill fuel to 4-injectors when the engine is cold and the throttle is pushed past certain RPM set-points. On Volvo Penta's of the same vintage, no audible warning when this happens but it's visible on the scan tool. Likewise, if protect mode is triggered from high heat (or a high heat ECT reading) for example, 4-injectors are killed if RPM's are above a certain level (generally 2,500 until below 1,200). On Volvo Penta's of the same vintage, there is an audible alarm and it's visible on the scan tool. I don't know if Mercury's audible alarms function this way or not. Regardless of Mercury or Volvo Penta, the scan tool will show what is going on. I assume each was grounded-out on the port side, and each sparked with the plug seated. Correct? If so, there's spark and it's not a sensor killing spark. There are only two things the ECM controls to protect the engine at the individual cylinder level - spark/no-spark and fuel/no-fuel (via the injectors). If there's spark with the plug seated, we've narrowed to compression or more likely a sensor. A few quick questions. When new manifolds were replaced, were new exhaust temperature sensors/switches installed? Was the hole pre-drilled (it should be a blind hole, not a thru-hole)? Is the wire seated on both ends? Is the wire good? The first part of this sentence indicates the port side is not running, for whatever reason. What does this last part mean (..., and that one tested the same as the port plugs.")?
  17. This is loaded question. In my opinion, yes. Others will disagree. It's kind of like some prefer Mercury, while others prefer Volvo. In reality, both are right. In general, we're looking for values in the range of 125 to 160, with no more than a 25% (some say 10%) difference between the max. and min. The pick ups are magnets or slots. Sometimes they shift, get hit, etc. I'm not saying this is the issue, and I don't suggest replacing it at this time. More troubleshooting is required. I don't know the Mercury spec. The 5.0 Volvo Penta spec. is 50 to 60 PSI, +/- 2. Flutter is normal. Okay. The two that were damaged, did they appear hit (e.g. impact damage), broken or "worn away"? 11 ft.-lbs. is proper torque. (a) Your ECM likely has an engine rev. limiter that drops-out 4 cylinders when coolant temperature is less 140-F. Likewise, there's a protect mode that reduces/limits power or kills the engine when certain parameters are exceeded, e.g. high temperature, low oil pressure, etc. What you described in an earlier posts sounds like it could be either of these modes kicking in. What to fix lies in determining which mode is kicking in. Scanning for codes and a live scan are the next steps, unless there's an audible alarm that can be described. Anything other is remove and replace, remove and replace, remove and replace. (Testing the ECT and the other sensors that trigger protect mode is possible. It is much more time consuming compared to a scan tool though; many hours vs. a few minutes. Most sensors operate at 5 volts. An open circuit on either the signal or return wire sets a high voltage fault, which is interpreted by the ECM as needing to reduce power, or depending on the sensor, kill the engine. There's some variation to the preceding, but in general this is how it works.) (b) Another possibility, particularly given manifold replacement and so forth, is chaffed wiring. (c) How does the engine sound with new plugs. Normal, or is it missing or power limited?
  18. I believe the port engine is the one where the new thermostat was causing overheating? Also, please post the full model and year of the engines. So, on both sides of the port engine there was a missing/broke center electrode on a spark plug? Not trying to call you out, but could be two bad new plugs (manufacturing defect or damage from installation (dropped, over torqued, etc.). If there was interference in these two cylinders, which is unlikely, the engine would have made a pretty decent noise and you'd of heard it. What's concerning is where did the broke pieces go... A compression check is a great idea, like wise so is changing the oil/oil filter (again) and replacing all of the plugs (being sure to not drop or over torque, and that the heat range and gap are correct for the engine). The fact moving the crankshaft position sensor didn't change the result, points to the plugs at this time (this could change as more information is developed). Could also be a bad reluctor wheel, but two bad plugs will cause power problems and known good plugs are needed before further troubleshooting can occur.
  19. Curt

    Vessel View Mobile

    The fault code is related to the speed sensing pitot system. In many, not all boats, the lower unit has a "pin hole" (about 1/8 inch diameter) on the leading edge. This opening is connected to a tube. Changes in pressure are used to calculate the boat's speed. In other boats the pitot is external to the lower unit, and is mounted on the transom. In yet others there is a wheel. In current generation digital boats, these older methods to determine speed are being replaced by GPS. In general, since make, model, model year of the respective boats, engines and drives is unknown, the error is being caused by: a pitot system that is not functioning properly (could be clogged, could be disconnected, etc.); sensor output is incompatible; failed sensor; there is no pitot system in the particular make/model but Vessel View is configured such that it's looking for an input, but one doesn't exit; etc. If the boat is kept in the water, it's pretty easy for algae or a bit of gunk to plug the hole. A soft pipe cleaner works well, as does a cotton swab, coat hanger (be careful), etc. To help figure this out, which could be the same or a different root cause for your installation, start with understanding how speed is registered on your boat, and whether or not the dash speedometer gauge is functioning (i.e. registering speed when underway). Also, confirm that Vessel View is not registering/displaying speed on its readout. If yes, look at the other causes.
  20. Curt

    Pink Mold on stitching seams

    To avoid pinking (on the plastic, foam, the backing, the stitching), which is a strain of mold, an anti-fungal/anti-microbial is added when manufactured. The less expensive way to bring this ingredient into the material is to combine it with an epoxidized soybean oil. The problem is that the expoxidized soybean oil is "food" for mold. So, to combat common pinking, the anti-fungal/anti-microbial is combined with "food" for what's trying to be avoided. Some sources don't include an anti-fungal/anti-microbial; some have inconsistent manufacturing processes so there is variation lot by lot; some use a more expensive, but more effective way to create a fungal and mold free product; etc. Quality almost always costs more. Some totally accept and pay for it. Some are not, and have problems from time to time. Choices... I'm sure you see it in your business. That picture you posted of that sump-box at the bottom of those stairs says a lot. That's great work, is great quality and will perform effectively for a long, long time. I'm sure some you've showed that system to view it as unnecessary effort and cost. Often, not always, these are the folks that then gripe when water washes in. Quality almost always costs more. The problem with pinking, which is 100% avoidable, is no owner regardless of price point wants it. But, when material choices are made to achieve certain price points, the outcome becomes a best and inconsistent roll of the dice. To me, IMHO, this means the specifier in this case has to "stand above" and make sure the material choice supports no pinking regardless. (P.S. The OP posted about pinking on stitching. Watson posed about pink drainage/accumulation - it sure does look like pink antifreeze - great observation. Interesting for sure, but different from the OP here.) (P.S.S. No pinking on our boat.)
  21. Curt

    Pink Mold on stitching seams

    Rather, what isn't being used...
  22. Excellent list. 2. Good idea if you can. 6. Both work. I use AF. Less disassembly. 7. I leave mine dry, but flush the AF through. With a little disassembly of the holding tank, a wet-dry shop vac works just fine. Can be messy though if the system was used a lot, or the pump out so-so.
  23. Curt

    Pumpout fitting

    If the marina has the "rubber funnel", size and threads don't matter. Push it in, hold it, hit the vacuum and it'll be empty in a minute or two.
  24. Curt

    Need a Prop for my 204 ssi

    Actually, it's not strength and more a matter of heritage and market focus. Mercury has long, long built performance engines and outdrives for the true "go-fast" crowd. In addition, they've collaborated with General Motors and even supplied the engine for the Corvette at various times. Speed is in their blood, or so to say, and this knowledge, technology and experience trickle down into the more "tempered" market segments. On the other hand, Volvo Penta is more focused on the commercial, leisure and recreational markets where reliability and longevity (a.k.a. durability) are valued over speed. While great engines and outdrives, the "go-fast" crowd is not the target market. (P.S. I'm not implying Mercury engines and outdrives are not reliable or durable, they are in both respects, just different.) With enough time and money, it can be done but takes more than the shafts. Easy, no. Impossible, no. Economical, no. Wise, not really, but it depends on your objectives and horsepower (there are more parasitic losses).
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