Whalersailor

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About Whalersailor

  • Birthday 06/27/1965

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  1. Had my cell phone, digital camera, GPS unit and truck keys go in once when the Mrs. drove the dock cart off the dock. Everything was in a canvas boating bag. Lost the camera and GPS unit, but thank goodness not the keys or phone. Phone was never right again after that. All in all about $1500. Needless to say, I now put everything into a large ziplock bag before getting on or off the boat.
  2. Maybe a tie down for the cooler or somewhere to secure a table or cover?
  3. I do this each year to clean and bottom paint. This was year one prior to epoxy barrier coat and bottom painting. Was also working on the lower unit and replacing the Gimble Ring. Get yourself (borrow or buy) a set of boat stands and grease the threads well. You can use them to actually lift the rear of the boat without a bottle jack. Then get yourself enough old scrap 2"x12" boards or railroad ties and cut them down to make a stack which is high enough (18-22") to keep the boat lifted off the trailer. Use a 3-6 ton bottle jack with a wood block ( I have a V cut into mine to keep it on the keel). Once up, block it and lower. Slowly move the trailer forward until a trailer crossmember is about to hit the blocking. Stop and jack boat off the stack of wood and reset the blocking behind the crossmember. Repeat until you have cleared all cross members (you may want to have two stacks). Keep trailer where it is and do not pull it too far out and away to park somewhere else or you have to get it all lined up again. When putting the trailer back under the boat, repeat, but this time hook the winch hook to the boat and use the trailer winch to crank and move the trailer back under the boat. Once the boat is off the trailer, I add more blocking to the rear at the keel and several more along the forward and mid keel areas to spread the weight out. In the photo I used cinder blocks, but only at the rear keel (do not use cinder blocks, they will not handle the weight). All others were solid wood stacks/blocks. Majority of the rear weight is still on the jacks which I cut down on my table saw to fit the stands under the boat over the threaded lift/support shafts. I also used 2'x10" x 12' boards to set the jacks and blocks on to keep them from sinking into the ground. Go slow, think and be safe is the key. Its a process, but when done right, the boat is going nowhere.
  4. I would advise you to at the very least speak with an attorney to see what the best approach to settling this would be. They are going to be the ones who can best guide you within the parameters of your state and local consumer laws.
  5. If you have checked all your lines and faucets and they are good, check the pump itself. There is likely a small piece of debris (a piece of slime, a hair or something) or a dry rotted/cracked diaphragm seal. The pump is a centrifugal one that as it spins, allows water to pass through the diaphragms. Once pressure is achieved, the pump shuts off and the diaphragms seal shut keeping the pressure. At least that is suppose to be how it works normally. If you have a piece of debris or a damaged diaphragm, it allows water to back flow into the water tank resulting in a pressure drop causing the pump to oscillate on/off.
  6. I believe that may be part of your galvanic protection system.
  7. That surprised me as well Brick as it is a significant safety concern. Most refueling docks by me have a large magnet tied to the end of a rope. They will allow you to use it to see if you can retrieve the lost gas caps, keys and other metal items.
  8. Just buy a new one for about 10-30 deer delivered (depends on type and rating). Very easy to replace and you won't have to worry about any other potential weak sections.
  9. I use the tablets with no issues (we only use it to wash, not drink). As a habit, I also pull the inline filter and clean it when I am filling up the water tank.
  10. I used to get staining from the tannic acids in the waters of the Del. Bay until I realized what was going on. We would go out boating and once home, I would clean the boat and stains. This went on for a few trips until I realized what was happening, I never sealed/waxed the gelcoat to prevent the stains from penetrating again the next time I went out. Once waxed, the stains never came back.
  11. When and where I grew up, everyone and I mean everyone proudly flew the American flag on holidays like today to honor our dead. I went and hung our flags this morning and looked down my street and around the neighborhood as I always do.
  12. No priming needed. Very common for the pump to fail. A bit premature on a 2013, but it is a boat and things break or fail all the time. Break out your voltmeter and take a reading at the pump with the accessory/water pump switch on. If you have volts, pull the pump and bench test it, check the pressure switch to see if something has it hung open (off). If no volts, your problem is somewhere in the supply power to the pump.
  13. You should have a round access panel just below the walk through in the wall by the rear cockpit drain. Open it, reach in and pull the pin on the hydraulic lift to release it from the lid. Get a 2' long 2x4 and lift the hatch manually. It's heavy, but can be lifted by one person. Once you lift it up, have one of your kids or your Mrs. prop it open with the 2x4. Or you could keep trying to charge the batteries. Once up, use additional supports if you don't feel comfortable with just one 2x4.
  14. If you get it at West Marine, you're going to avoid return shipping charges if ordered online. Sounds like the second store is willing to work with you, so what do you have to lose by going to them?
  15. 3" in a pretty good tear. Very likely that it will tear again if repaired and stressed. Replace the cover with a new one. I had a small puncture hole repaired by a local upholstery shop and I struggle to find the repair now. 3" repair is going to be hard to hide.