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Pops

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    South East New York, Hudson Valley

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  1. Pops

    What is the speed of the high speed boat?

    Yeah, I suppose. Was giving benefit of doubt when he mentioned "shrimp tails", since I have seen them in action. Thought he may have been asking a legit question in VERY broken English. My bad.
  2. Pops

    What is the speed of the high speed boat?

    Ummm, it is a "Knot". 1 knot =1.15 MPH (1.852 kph). What is your question, really? The "speed of a high speed boat" is somewhat subjective and is to be compared to what? Anything over 25 mph (40.22 kph) , anything over 50 mph (80.47 kph)????? maihiendanag.... You from SE Asia? I know the "shrimp tails" fairly well as they were pretty common, along with the sampans, on the rivers of VN and Thailand. They are pretty quick and somewhat scary / dangerous, considering the long shaft w/ a bare prop attached sticking out the back of what is essentially a homemade outboard. Even saw some w/ V-6 and V-8 engines and they would haul a$$ on the back of a 16-20 foot long boat that resembled a dug out canoe. Anything can be made "fast", but at what risk?
  3. Pops

    Freezing temps, help

  4. Pops

    Freezing temps, help

    It is not a problem, as those temps are barely freezing for a very short period. It takes a few hours well below freezing to cool down all the mass of an engine and it's internals to freeze it up. If it'll make you feel better, toss a drop light in the engine compartment (light on), cover her back up and sleep soundly. The heat from the light bulb (incandescent 60 watt or higher) is enough to keep engine compartment warm / above freezing temps in a soft freeze. Normally, a "soft freeze" won't do any harm. It's a sustained hard freeze (20's and below for an extended period) that will get ya.
  5. Pops

    Engine Removal Proceedure

    Try Jegs or Summit racing and look at their crate engines. That 5.7 is a no brainer in the racing circles and not too big of a price tag. Just be cognizant of compression ration and be ready to change the cam to a marine cam. Even bump it to a 383 / 6.2L SB for short bucks.
  6. Pops

    Engine Removal Proceedure

    When I drove a tow truck, many boat owners here in SE Mass hired us to use the wrecker to lift the engine out. Was easy, even when a boat was in the water, along side the pier, or in their driveway.
  7. Pops

    IRS scammer, lets have at them

    LOL. I had one tell me the call was my last chance to pay up because they were on their way to my house to make the arrest. I told "he better bring some backup" and call the EMT's to meet them there because they'll need them. Didn't hear from the dip sheit again.
  8. Pops

    Serious leak from transom area

    One way to check when in water, raise / lower drive and see if flow changes. If yes, definitely the bellows. If no, need to look at shifter boot, Y-pipe, steering/gimbal pin. Or, pull drive and see if any water sitting in bellows. Bravo drives come off in about 30-45 minutes (using air tools and a drive dolly-too heavy to lift). I pull mine off every fall for winter layup.
  9. Pops

    1994 25.5 SSX

    If the present owner will tell you what the Hull ID Number (HIN) is, that'll tell you what year the boat is. The HIN serves the same function as a VIN on a car or truck. The last 2 numbers are the "model" year. For boats built or manufactured August 1, 1984 or later: Manufacturer Identification Code (MIC) Hull or Serial Number Manufacture Date, where the second digit is the last digit of the year, and the first is a code for the month as below: A: Jan E: May I: Sep B: Feb F: Jun J: Oct C: Mar G: Jul K Nov D: Apr H: Aug L: Dec Model year To decipher the HIN, look here: http://www.hinsearchplus.com/hs_userguide.aspx
  10. Pops

    1994 25.5 SSX

    Are you sure about the model numbers? I have the '93 / '94 owner's manual and there is no mention of a 25.5 SXX. Pretty sure you are looking at a 2550 SX (not the SX Sport, because the Sport has a full width rear seat and lounge sun pad over the engine compartment full width hatch. Yours has the 2 jump seats w/ small engine cover). The 454 is a great engine and will give you plenty of power. If taken care of, lasts a very long time and is super dependable.. My '92 2550 SX Sport with 454 (Mercruiser w/ B1) is original with over 1300 hours on it. That's a really good price for a great boat in the '94/'95 year bracket, provided it's not the dreaded Volvo drive with all the problems. Don't recall the designation of the drive, but I'm sure others here versed on the Volvo Pentas will chime in on the "stay away from" drive.
  11. Pops

    Should I carry a spare prop or two?

    If you kabong a S/S prop hard enough to damage it, chances are that's the least of your problems, as your drive also absorbed that impact, since the S/S won't give like an aluminum one will. Drive damage would be very possible. It's funny, but years ago they used to sell plastic bladed props w/ replaceable blades for lower powered boats. The fishermen loved these, since they were often in the shallows, and banging something with the prop is common in the shallows. Fifteen minutes replacing a broken blade with motor tilted up and off to the races again.
  12. Pops

    LED Lighting -Potential interference of VHF

    Usually, LED assy's used in 12 VDC application have a driver / voltage regulator circuit built in, since the LED's are normally rated for 2.2 to 3.3 VDC forward voltage. These driver / regulators can be so small they are barely visible or even built into the LED itself. The 12 VDC will smoke unprotected LED's immediately unless the voltage is reduced either with a regulator or a fixed resistor load in series. Although the scheme is used occasionally, nine times out of ten the fixed resistor setup can be sketchy for some systems, like in a boat, where the voltage can easily fluctuate 2-3 (or more) volts, depending on the engine running or not and / or loads turning on and off, causing the input voltage to the LED's to fluctuate respectively. If the LED driver / regulator is made with cheaper parts (usually inferior capacitors that don't filter out the voltage spikes of the regulator) or have a marginal design, they can emit an RF (radio frequency) signal from the enclosed electronics of the regulator. This RF, in turn, can induce "noise" into equipment like radios, such as a buzzing or raspy static and / or cause stability problems in unshielded equipment like electronic instrumentation. An LED, in itself, will not induce any RF, since it is a constant given load, even with resistors to "drop the voltage" to a usable level. Hope this helps
  13. Pops

    Ever witness a boating accident?

    Yup, a Sunday afternoon on the sea wall, at Green Harbor in Marshfield MA, w/ a cooler. Was great afternoon entertainment, especially when the tide was running strong in the river. Only wish they had the video equipment back then that is available today.
  14. Pops

    LED Lighting -Potential interference of VHF

    As cyclops2 says, it isn't the LED causing the problem. LED's turn on and maintain a steady state till they turn off. It is the regulators and / or drivers doing it. It's usually the cheapo discounted stuff from you know where that uses the cheapest electronic components found on the planet.
  15. Pops

    Ever witness a boating accident?

    Having the bucks to purchase a boat like that does not mean the fellow driving has a lick of common sense. Just has a fat wallet (not as fat as it was before the crash, anyway).
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