Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'outdrive'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Contests!!
    • Contests!!
    • Polls!!
  • Chaparral Boats Forum
    • Boat Talk
    • Dock Talk
    • Newbies
    • Info Center
  • Regional Forums
    • Midwest U.S.
    • Northeast U.S.
    • South Central U.S.
    • Southeastern U.S.
    • West Coast U.S.
    • Northwest U.S.
    • Rocky Mountain Region U.S.
    • Eastern Canada
    • Western Canada
    • International Boating
  • Suggestions & Comments
    • Site Suggestions & Comments
  • Gulf Coast

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 9 results

  1. JoeGreenville

    PER-OWNED 1999 2330 SSI CHAP

    Considering purchasing a pre-owned 1999 2330 SSI. Current owner says he thinks gimble bearing needs to be replaced as he feels something in the out drive when he turns to the right. Any other items I should be concerned about or ask about? thanks, Joe 1998 Chaparral 2330 SS bowrider (24’) with a 5.7 L Mercruiser with Bravo 3 dual prop outdrive.
  2. I went fishing today, and after I loaded my boat on to the trailer I noticed some blue fluid on the ground. I checked the drive fluid reservoir in the boat, and as you can see by the pictures below it did not appear to be too low. This leak just started today because I've never noticed it before. I called my local marina to determine what the problem could be; however, due to the holiday weekend coming up they cannot look at my boat until after the holiday. So I did some poking around and took some pictures for you all. Initial leak seems to be due to a cracked or dry rotted line: Nothing leaking from the grey plastic elbow that connects the O/D to the bellows (i ran my finger all the way up the elbow and it was dry): However, as you can see below the leak is coming from the hose that connects to the O/D: Fluid level of the reservoir after I found the leak: It's not an extremely fast leak, but the more I examine that line it is definitely dry rotted pretty bad (much like the exhaust bellows). Since my local marina cannot fix this issue until after the holidays I just wanted to get some input from the community. Thank you. Jake
  3. Trep19

    New to me

    Hi guys, just bought a 2000 196 SSI. I'm trying to figure out what exactly the engine and outdrive are? i have a 5.0 with a carb. 220hp? I'm just trying to figure out what the outdrive is? Is it an alpha gen 2? I want to buy the service manual so I can keep up with the regular maintenance of the engine and outdrive. Thanks Trep
  4. Trep19

    New to me

    Hi guys, just bought a 2000 196 SSI. I'm trying to figure out what exactly the engine and outdrive are? i have a 5.0 with a carb. 220hp? I'm just trying to figure out what the outdrive is? Is it an alpha gen 2? I want to buy the service manual so I can keep up with the regular maintenance of the engine and outdrive. Thanks Trep
  5. Tavern Monk

    Bravo 3 Hits Hard Going into Gear

    Have a 2000 240ssi with the 7.4mpi and Bravo 3. Shift cable, outdrive service, u joints, bellows... were all done this year. Shifting was extremely quiet & smooth, but it hesitated for 3 or 4 seconds going into reverse. Had the cone clutch, shift fork, and bearings replaced. There is no more hesitation going into reverse. Shifting into forward and reverse is instantaneouse, but it shifts into gear very hard. I almost feel bad putting it into gear sometimes. Didn't realize how bad it actually was until my friend was docking it for my while I was on the floater and I could hear it from 15 feet away go into gear. RPM are just over 600 or 650 or so. Any thoughts, recommendations, or similar experiences after a cone clutch replacement?
  6. southerngent

    Need a new outdrive

    Hello everyone! Im new to the board and am in need of some help. While taking my 1994 24ft chaparral out for the first time this year, the outdrive locked up on me. Once we got it out of the water and had my mechanic look at it, we determined that there was an unknown crack in the foot of the outdrive that allowed all of the oil to drain out, running it dry. He determined that the entire outdrive needs to be replaced (foot cracked, gears destroyed). We currently have a twin prop bravo three outdrive, and that what we want to replace it with. My question is this: where can I order a new outdrive online for a decent price? Any and all suggestions will be appreciated. TJ
  7. southerngent

    Need an outdrive

    Hello everyone! Im new to the board and am in need of some help. While taking my 1994 24ft chaparral out for the first time this year, the outdrive locked up on me. Once we got it out of the water and had my mechanic look at it, we determined that there was an unknown crack in the foot of the outdrive that allowed all of the oil to drain out, running it dry. He determined that the entire outdrive needs to be replaced (foot cracked, gears destroyed). We currently have a twin prop bravo three outdrive, and that what we want to replace it with. My question is this: where can I order a new outdrive online for a decent price? Any and all suggestions will be appreciated. TJ
  8. Hello Newbies - copying and modifying this from an earlier post in hopes it might give some information to new and recently new boaters who are still getting acquainted with how to operate your new toy. Many new boaters are intimidated by the trim button, mainly because the boat seems to do okay when it's all the way down and if you accidentally raise it too high then you get a really disconcerting sound out of the back of your boat as your props blow out. So, better off to just leave it alone, right? Not really. It's not all that hard and there are some real benefits you will gain. You can have this well in hand in just a couple of hours and mastered in half a season or less, depending on how many hours you are on the water. In my first season I didn't adjust trim too much because it just was a little bit of a mystery and I had plenty of other things to get familiar with. But it's not all that mysterious after all and you'll find that you don't need to trim up too much but a little will make a pretty big difference in the ride and handling. Next time you are on some pretty smooth open water, keep the trim tabs (if you have them) retracted all the way up and trim the drive all the way in/down. Get through the holeshot and on plane, say about 3000 rpm, which is well on plane and getting into cruising range for most boats. Now just bump the trim "Up" twice (this is also referred to as bumping the trim "Out" by some people, and "In" is the same as "Down"). You will feel the bow come up just a bit; watch the tach and the GPS speed (you can use a phone or iPad GPS app if you don't have an on-board GPS). Don't adjust your throttle just yet. Listen to the engine as it changes and actually speeds up. You'll hear it seeming to work less also and you might even detect that there is a little bit less vibration in your deck and/or hull. The tach will probably go up about 200 - 300 rpm and speed should go up about 2-3 mph. Leave the throttle alone for now. When it settles out, bump it twice more and see what the effect is. Probably about the same effect - couple hundred RPM increase and maybe a couple MPH speed increase. Repeat a couple more times and you'll see a point where it doesn't do anything, and in fact you'll reach a point where the prop starts blowing out a little. Don't panic - you're not going to destroy your engine or drive. Just bump back down 1-2 pops on the trim button, and let it settle out again. Keep experimenting bumping the trim back down using tach, speed, and engine sound until you see a negative effect - chances are at that point you are in about the right trim setting for your water conditions and boat speed. Bump back up 1-2 clicks and you're there. On a Bravo 3 or VP DP it's likely will never get you above the quarter trim marker. On an Alpha One or VP SP, you will be able to trim up a bit farther, right at the quarter trim mark and maybe just a hair above. Be aware that on shorter boats (21 feet and below), especially those with single prop drives, you may experience some porpoising at or before the max trim up position. If you're porpoising, then just start bumping back down a bit as described before until the porpoising stops. At that point, you are trimmed at about the right spot, give or take a bump in either direction. Now with the boat settled out and in what should be the proper trim position, just quickly turn the helm a few degrees port then starboard and you will feel the boat seeming a bit more nimble as you zigzag. A slighter turn of the wheel turns the boat a bit more in either direction because you are not turning the entire length of the hull. At this point you've got probably 60-70% of your hull out of the water, drag and fuel consumption drop and you feel like you're just flying right above the water. I have had some times on a 21 foot bowrider with an Alpha One drive where I could swear there was only about 4 feet of hull forward of the transom in the water. You can repeat this process at 2200 (probably where you just reach steady plane) and 4000 rpm and also at WOT and you'll find that the optimum trim is slightly different at different ranges. It will also be slightly different in light chop, heavy chop, etc. Once you get the feel of it you'll be able to do most of your trimming by sound and feel. Pilots can tell you that a properly trimmed plane just feels right and requires less work to fly. You won't feel the "less work" thing so much in a boat, but your engine and steering will. Couple more tips: You can't turn the boat hard over to port or starboard at cruising speeds and higher when you are at the optimum trim point; Think about it - you have tilted the drive up a few degrees in order to lift the front of the boat hull out of the water. When you turn, that upward tilted drive will get closer to the water surface and perhaps break the surface - it's just simple geometry. Therefore, a tight turn requires trimming back in and a full hard over turn requires fully trimmed in. That is just boating technique that we all learn and apply every day we are on the water. Once you complete the hard turn and are back in straight line motion, you can just quickly pop the trim back up to where it was before the turn and you are good to just keep on cruising and enjoying the ride. If you have trim tabs on your boat: It's a myth that if you have trim tabs, you don't really have to worry about trimming the drive. They both have their distinct functions and benefits so don't cheat yourself out of either one. Once you get the feel of this drive trim stuff, just use your trim tabs as normal and you'll see some additional benefits at cruising speed beyond the engine trim. Trim tabs will generate some of the same effects as engine trim, i.e. lifting the bow up out of the water, even if you don't trim the engine, but a fully trimmed engine especially in Bravo 1 position has physics on the hull that even trim tabs won't counter. Get your engine trimmed, then get your tabs trimmed and you will feel a happy boat under your feet and hands.
  9. clifton65

    Outdrive swap

    I have a Chaparral 190 ssi with a volvo penta 4.3 liter v6. I am having to raplace the outdrive, because of a gear oil leak which resulted in a locked up outdrive. my current outdrive is a volvo sx. I have a friend who has a volvo dp outdrive. Does anyone know if the outdrives are compatible? Can I use the DP outdrive on my boat? Please let me know if you need more information. Thanks.
×