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single battery drain rate and charging questions

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My new 215 will be a single battery boat. Based on experience, how quickly does the battery drain down in battery off mode (just bilge on)? I realize there are may variables here. Should the boat always be left in battery off mode when not in operation? Can the battery be left connected to a smart trickle charger (in battery on or battery off mode) Thanks in advance for any advice.

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My new 215 will be a single battery boat. Based on experience, how quickly does the battery drain down in battery off mode (just bilge on)? I realize there are may variables here. Should the boat always be left in battery off mode when not in operation? Can the battery be left connected to a smart trickle charger (in battery on or battery off mode) Thanks in advance for any advice.

I have a single battery set-up in mine with the on/off switch, prolly the same as yours. I made the mistake of leaving the switch in the "on" position right after I got the boat. Big mistake, she was dead in less than 2 weeks. I never really figured out where the draw was coming from and the dealer told me it was the memory on the stereo. Not sure if that was the case, but from that point forward, I always switch the selector to the off position. Power still goes to the bilge and transom trailer switch. Haven't had any problems since and still have the original battery in there(just a cranking battery). Probably soon time to replace come to think of it, 2+ years so far. 30 extra seconds at the dock to flip the switch saves a few curse words from flying from my mouth. Doing it this way, I've been able to leave her for up to a month without a problem.

On the occasions that I pull her from the marina for service work or cleaning, I hook up a trickle charger to the battery with switch "off" while she sits in the driveway. Another point of interest, make sure the water level is topped off in the battery. I don't have a maintenance free battery and I have to occasionally add some fluid to the cells. Still seems to be working just fine for us.

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Your radio memory should already be wired above this switch (as in with the switch OFF the radio memory still receives power). I am willing to strongly bet your dealership is wrong on that one. Besides radio memory is basically a non-event (should takes WEEKS to run down a starting battery if not longer).

Something else is eating power when the switch is on. The only way to find it is to open all of your DC circuit breakers (the pop out ones) and measure battery voltage. Then close them one at a time and see which ones causes a reaction to the battery voltage.

I would recommend leaving the switch OFF for a bowrider. There are no systems that need the power so no reason to leave it on. YOu can still install a trickle charger and leave the switch off.

On my 310 I leave all 3 ON because I have a battery charger that is on shore power. This is because I'm too lazy to turn them back ON each time I get to the boat. But if I turned them OFF it would not make a bit of a difference as nothing they power is drawing amperage. Now should my marina have a long power outage and should I have accidentally left a light on or something I will come back to dead batteries...

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Your radio memory should already be wired above this switch (as in with the switch OFF the radio memory still receives power). I am willing to strongly bet your dealership is wrong on that one. Besides radio memory is basically a non-event (should takes WEEKS to run down a starting battery if not longer).

Something else is eating power when the switch is on. The only way to find it is to open all of your DC circuit breakers (the pop out ones) and measure battery voltage. Then close them one at a time and see which ones causes a reaction to the battery voltage.

I would recommend leaving the switch OFF for a bowrider. There are no systems that need the power so no reason to leave it on. YOu can still install a trickle charger and leave the switch off.

On my 310 I leave all 3 ON because I have a battery charger that is on shore power. This is because I'm too lazy to turn them back ON each time I get to the boat. But if I turned them OFF it would not make a bit of a difference as nothing they power is drawing amperage. Now should my marina have a long power outage and should I have accidentally left a light on or something I will come back to dead batteries...

Rather than trouble shoot where the drain was from, shutting the power "off" has solved my problem. Like I said before, the couple seconds it takes to flip my switch works for me. Heck, I open the hatch to check fluids anyway, so reaching down to the battery isn't a problem.

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I have a single battery set-up in mine with the on/off switch, prolly the same as yours. I made the mistake of leaving the switch in the "on" position right after I got the boat. Big mistake, she was dead in less than 2 weeks. I never really figured out where the draw was coming from and the dealer told me it was the memory on the stereo. Not sure if that was the case, but from that point forward, I always switch the selector to the off position. Power still goes to the bilge and transom trailer switch. Haven't had any problems since and still have the original battery in there(just a cranking battery). Probably soon time to replace come to think of it, 2+ years so far. 30 extra seconds at the dock to flip the switch saves a few curse words from flying from my mouth. Doing it this way, I've been able to leave her for up to a month without a problem.

On the occasions that I pull her from the marina for service work or cleaning, I hook up a trickle charger to the battery with switch "off" while she sits in the driveway. Another point of interest, make sure the water level is topped off in the battery. I don't have a maintenance free battery and I have to occasionally add some fluid to the cells. Still seems to be working just fine for us.

Thanks - great advice, I assume the switch is located near the battery and is easily accessed from the engine hatch?

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Thanks - great advice, I assume the switch is located near the battery and is easily accessed from the engine hatch?

Mine is very easy to get to. Although I have a bowrider, I'm pretty certain accessability is the same. Might be even easier on yours. My battery and switch is on the starboard side under a composite hinged shelf. Yours might be completely out in the open in the engine bay.

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My old boat had a WM battery in it, with a single set up no switch. Never lost a charge all summer would just trickle charge it in fall and spring; threw the battery in the basement. I did after a new stareo upgrade, added a switch and second battry. It would sometimes sit a few weeks no problem. But I always started my boat in the drive every weekend before we left for the ramp. I far as I know that battery is still in the boat 6 years old(I work with the guy).

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We turned our power switch off as a precaution when we had the Sunesta. We did have a drain on the battery once when our shop put in an automatic pump for the sink and hoOKed it up wrong so it was always on, even when the battery switch was off. But after we fixed that we would be ok if we forgot to turn the bat switch off for a week or so.

If it were me, I would want to know what is draining my battery and get it fixed.

Perhaps Webbie can chime in and let you know where the switch is on this boat.

Good luck.

Jim

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I do not leave the charger on in my 310 and I turn the batteries off, Couple of things that cause my battery to go dead. Carbon Monoxide dectors are on all the time and bilge. If you have a sink on your boat make sure there an no leaks I had a fitting not quit tight enough and a little pressure drain would cause the fresh water pump to come on drained my batteries in 2 days. Leaving a charger on in hot weather may dry out your batteries

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I do not leave the charger on in my 310 and I turn the batteries off, Couple of things that cause my battery to go dead. Carbon Monoxide dectors are on all the time and bilge. If you have a sink on your boat make sure there an no leaks I had a fitting not quit tight enough and a little pressure drain would cause the fresh water pump to come on drained my batteries in 2 days. Leaving a charger on in hot weather may dry out your batteries

I also keep all my switches off.

With all switches on, the refrigerators run on battery power even if you are connected to shore power. With the switches off and connected to shore power your refrigerators run on shore power. I keep beverages in both refrigerators so I keep the friges on all the time. Keeping the switches off causes your recharger to work all the time significantly reducing its useful life. Your batteries are constantly discharging and charging also reducing their useful life. Now if you keep you refrigerators off then, no worries.

The drawback is that if the marina loses power, I will not have a cold beer when I get to the boat! :angry2::angry2:

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Thanks - great advice, I assume the switch is located near the battery and is easily accessed from the engine hatch?

For the 215 SSi, battery drain will depend greatly on whether or not the carbon monoxide detector is plugged in and working. If it is, the battery will be dead in close to a week IMO. Alternative is remembering to plug the CO monitor back in each time you use the boat, or installing a battery charger. A functioning CO monitor is crucial for people sleeping on the boat.

Up here in the Great White North, a boat can sometimes sit for 2 weeks or more if the weather is not cooperating; even during peak season. For that reason, we rewire the stereo memory wires on new boats to get around the stereo memory draw. New Clarion stereos will store the stereo presets for 12 months without being connected to battery power. The only inconvenience is when the battery switch is next turned on, the stereo will come on, even if turned off before turning the battery off.

Leaving the battery switch on, regardless of the stock wiring, or our small change will kill the batteries in less than a week. (I think the radio is drawing power, even if the stereo is turned off)

I don't know if Chaparral were to install a 4 position key switch (accy) and re-wire the stereo to work off the key would alleviate the stero memory battery drain question or not.

Battery switch for the 215 SSi is behind the rear lower vinyl cover on the stbd. side.

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I also keep all my switches off.

With all switches on, the refrigerators run on battery power even if you are connected to shore power. With the switches off and connected to shore power your refrigerators run on shore power. I keep beverages in both refrigerators so I keep the friges on all the time. Keeping the switches off causes your recharger to work all the time significantly reducing its useful life. Your batteries are constantly discharging and charging also reducing their useful life. Now if you keep you refrigerators off then, no worries.

The drawback is that if the marina loses power, I will not have a cold beer when I get to the boat! :angry2::angry2:

A few notes on these 2 posts:

The purpose of a battery charger is to leave it ON 24 hours a day 7 days a week when you are connected to shore power. That is what it is FOR. It will NOT dryout your batteries - it will actually prolong their life by years if they are floated at the proper voltage.

With shore power ON and all battery switches ON the Isotherm refrigerators will prefer SHORE POWER and will not run on battery. That is by design of the Isotherm voltage converter that allows 120vac to be a power input. If yours is not working that way you may need to take a look at your 120vac converter on the back of the fridge...

If you have a proper battery charger for a cruiser you will not be saw-toothing your batteries (constant charge/discharge) as the charger will float them and use it's internal dockside mode to provide 12vdc loads without using the batteries.

Someone mentioned they left the freshwater pump ON. That should be turned OFF when you leave the boat. This way a leak won't put water where it doesn't belong AND you won't have to replace a 200 deer pump that ran dry until it failed.

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I have an 08 215,like the great shepherd said, the co detector is a power killer, I installed a shut off switch in line instead of pulling off the cover,also have a battery operated one for a back-up.had a bad manifold gasket and the detectors knew it before I did.

also installed a second battery in the boat, if you turn the oem one port and starboard instead of bow to stern a second one will fit, if not consider a jump pack, some out now with 900cca that work very well.

also always turn off the batt. switch at the end of the day.

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I have an 08 215,like the great shepherd said, the co detector is a power killer, I installed a shut off switch in line instead of pulling off the cover,also have a battery operated one for a back-up.had a bad manifold gasket and the detectors knew it before I did.

also installed a second battery in the boat, if you turn the oem one port and starboard instead of bow to stern a second one will fit, if not consider a jump pack, some out now with 900cca that work very well.

also always turn off the batt. switch at the end of the day.

Hey gl115, hate to get off the subject of battery drain, but I noticed you said something about a manifold gasket leak. Just an FYI, I too had the manifolds leak on mine. One side replaced at the end of 08 and the other replaced in the middle of 09. Do you have the 5.0 MPI Merc? I remember talking about this issue somewhere on here in the past and it was recommended to re-tighten every year to avoid a gasket failure. Hopefully I can make it through 10 without any mechanical gremlins sneaking up on me.

Oh yeah, battery switch off when done for the day, but I said that already!

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Hey gl115, hate to get off the subject of battery drain, but I noticed you said something about a manifold gasket leak. Just an FYI, I too had the manifolds leak on mine. One side replaced at the end of 08 and the other replaced in the middle of 09. Do you have the 5.0 MPI Merc? I remember talking about this issue somewhere on here in the past and it was recommended to re-tighten every year to avoid a gasket failure. Hopefully I can make it through 10 without any mechanical gremlins sneaking up on me.

Oh yeah, battery switch off when done for the day, but I said that already!

mine were pinched from the factory, both sides, one went one season and one went the next. both at least covered under warranty. Yes got the 5.0 MPI, I like it. hope you avoid the gremlins, most of the time its proper maint. and don't beat the crap out of it and a little synthetic fluids goes a long way.

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mine were pinched from the factory, both sides, one went one season and one went the next. both at least covered under warranty. Yes got the 5.0 MPI, I like it. hope you avoid the gremlins, most of the time its proper maint. and don't beat the crap out of it and a little synthetic fluids goes a long way.

Sounds a lot like mine. Wonder if our motors were on the same production run. At least we have fresh gaskets in them now. Mine too were covered under warranty. I really hope I never hear that "ticking" noise again.

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Sounds a lot like mine. Wonder if our motors were on the same production run. At least we have fresh gaskets in them now. Mine too were covered under warranty. I really hope I never hear that "ticking" noise again.

That's the way mine was with the ticking sound,I thought what a faggy sounding exhaust leak, then if you put your head in the engine compartment you almost passed out from the fumes, the co detectors were more annoying and louder then the leak.

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A few notes on these 2 posts:

The purpose of a battery charger is to leave it ON 24 hours a day 7 days a week when you are connected to shore power. That is what it is FOR. It will NOT dryout your batteries - it will actually prolong their life by years if they are floated at the proper voltage.

With shore power ON and all battery switches ON the Isotherm refrigerators will prefer SHORE POWER and will not run on battery. That is by design of the Isotherm voltage converter that allows 120vac to be a power input. If yours is not working that way you may need to take a look at your 120vac converter on the back of the fridge...

If you have a proper battery charger for a cruiser you will not be saw-toothing your batteries (constant charge/discharge) as the charger will float them and use it's internal dockside mode to provide 12vdc loads without using the batteries.

Someone mentioned they left the freshwater pump ON. That should be turned OFF when you leave the boat. This way a leak won't put water where it doesn't belong AND you won't have to replace a 200 deer pump that ran dry until it failed.

Fred, I'll have to disagree with you on this one. Maybe your year boat works like that but 2007 year cruisers have a different electrical set up. With the house switch on even if you are on shore power your Isotherm fridge will draw from battery power. If you turn your House switch off and you are connected to shore power the fridge will go to 120V.

As to the battery charger I agree with you. I keep my battery charger on all the time. My point was that with the new electrical set up if I keep my house switch on all the time my batteries are working hard all the time and that takes years off the life of a battery. So I just turn all my switches off and let the fridges run on 120v.

Ill give you another example why my boats electrical is different. Your generator uses one of your staring batteries to crank right... My generator used the house battery to start. And no, its not wired wrong, I asked the Chap technicians and they verified that that is the way it works. :thththsoapbox2-1:

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Fred, I'll have to disagree with you on this one. Maybe your year boat works like that but 2007 year cruisers have a different electrical set up. With the house switch on even if you are on shore power your Isotherm fridge will draw from battery power. If you turn your House switch off and you are connected to shore power the fridge will go to 120V.

As to the battery charger I agree with you. I keep my battery charger on all the time. My point was that with the new electrical set up if I keep my house switch on all the time my batteries are working hard all the time and that takes years off the life of a battery. So I just turn all my switches off and let the fridges run on 120v.

Ill give you another example why my boats electrical is different. Your generator uses one of your staring batteries to crank right... My generator used the house battery to start. And no, its not wired wrong, I asked the Chap technicians and they verified that that is the way it works. :thththsoapbox2-1:

Is that both of the refrigerators? I agree with the generator does start from the house bank. Didn't know about the frige thing. It doesn't matter much, battery switches off when not on boat.

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Is that both of the refrigerators? I agree with the generator does start from the house bank. Didn't know about the frige thing. It doesn't matter much, battery switches off when not on boat.

Yup, both but get this, if I spent too much time on the hook without turning on the genset I would lose my house battery and of course I could not start my generator. I had to turn on the engines, get some charge to the house battery, and then crank the genset. What I did a year ago was add an extra house battery, this is not an issue any more. I have plenty O juice! :D

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Yup, both but get this, if I spent too much time on the hook without turning on the genset I would lose my house battery and of course I could not start my generator. I had to turn on the engines, get some charge to the house battery, and then crank the genset. What I did a year ago was add an extra house battery, this is not an issue any more. I have plenty O juice! :D

I have two Trojan SCS200 battries on the house side. Have not had a problem sitting out without the genset running.

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El Coqui - I would move your gen start to an engine battery...

And something is not working right on your fridges... below is straight from the isotherm manual -

4.7 Operation with converter

As an option, the refrigerators can be equipped with

an converter which operates on the mains power. It

can be mounted direct on the back of the refrigerator

or separately besides the refrigerator. The converter

will feed the power for the compressor direct from the

mains as long as this is available, and automatically

switch over to battery power when no mains power

is available. The converter must be connected to the

mains with an earthed power plug.

The AC converter should always run in the lead unless your shore power is a very low voltage day to day.

I am looking at the wiring diagram. The converter isolates the battery from being a source of power via a relay - as in the battery CAN'T power the fridge if AC is available. I bet your DC in and DC out are wired backwards on the converter. Go to www.isotherm.com and find the Cruise 130 or 65 (the 2 we typically have). The wiring diagram is there. Pin 1 and 3 are outputs to the fridge. Pin 2 and 4 are the battery input. If those are backwards the fridge would run on battery until the battery drops to 9.6vdc and then switch to AC until the battery is above 10.9vdc...

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Why not just add a 2nd battery? And while you are at it, add a charger. If you have shorepower, add a 2-bank charger. If no power, add a solar trickle charger.

brick

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