Chuck-arral

Tie down straps

16 posts in this topic

I recently purchased an 05 - 236 SSI and I wanted to know about the tie down straps at the back. The boat and trailer came together as a package so I am currently using the straps I have and they work good. At the rear of the boat there are two tie down straps that attach the boat to the trailer, and they are nylon buck-down straps 1" wide with light weight alum or steel metal parts for the housing. The main issues with this type of strap is that they need to be very tight through the cam-action to make these straps work correctly. The straps produce a lot of stress on the u-hooks that attach to the fiber glass hull of the boat. I wanted to know if anyone else has experience using similar straps and some answers to the following questions?

1) Are these standard straps from chaparral or the trailer manufacture? (Really does not matter but curious)

2) Are overly tight straps needed to hold the boat on the trailer during transportation?

3) Do the straps at the back of the boat really hold the boat on the trailer?

4) Is it standard to leave the straps locked down 24-7 or only during transportation?

5) Can I actually put enough tension on these straps using the cam-action that it could cause cracking around the u-hooks at the back?

(remember these strap have to be tight to work correctly)

6) Does anyone have an opinion about me only snug tighten the straps 24-7 as opposed to bringing them down real tight, so is it better or worse?

7) Will the cam-action straps still work efficiently if I only bring them down snug tight?

8) Just so you know I am opposed to loosing the straps while in storage, because I am worried that I or someone else will drive off with loose straps that might fail or fall off, so I am looking for a solutions for strapping down 24-7 that is tight enough to work.

9) Will a set of pull-down straps work just as well as these buck-down straps?

Thanks for you help?

post-7317-1273590000_thumb.jpg

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Chuck Good questions.

1. Probably not

2. Yes

3. Yes

4. Yes & No

5. Never had a problem with stress crack there.

6. Always tight

7. Yes

8. I agree

9. Not Necessarily

I use a set of Kwik-loc tie down straps with 2" straps on the back rated at 2400#. I also use a 2" ratchet strap on the front eye rated at 3500#. I don’t trust the winch strap to hold the boat and the little chain & hook is only good as a safety to get the boat off the ramp (in case the strap brakes) These straps stay on tight always except to clean & wax it. 1” straps are not sufficient to hold your boat in an emergency. IMO

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Also I see this alot but I do not unhook my boat from the winch till its in the water and running.

The Admiral Launches and Lands it... :clapsmiley:

matt

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This single point will address many of your questions/concerns.

Manufacturer/Dealer uses these lifting eyes to lift entire boat on off dolley/trailer/whatever. You can't make them too tight or with too much stress, they are designed to carry the full load of the boat.

Tie down straps are recommended any time your traveling except around launch/ramp. The tighter the better is the rule of thumb (assuming your trailer bunks are positioned properly under the boat). Prevents bounce and slipping back on rough roads or in minor incidents. If you have a major accident, not sure of the tie down value in this case. Seems likely force could exceed strap rating creating a failure (weakest link in the combination of lifting eyes and trailer steel).

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10 years as a firefighter, I have witness many boat, travel trailer, and RV accidents. IMO the straps are more to keep the trailer on the boat! When you look at the weight of the boat (4 to 7 K) vs. the weight of the trailer (1500-1800 lbs), the straps have a much better chance of retaining the trailer to the boat vs. the boat to the trailer.

Let me explain, during normal operation a properly strapped boat will stay put on the trailer under most circumstances. The straps will keep the boat off the back of the towing vehicle during hard/emergency stops and on the trailer during aggressive measures to avoid accidents. However during an accident or trailer separation from the tow vehicle, boats will most likely flip over and the straps should keep the trailer attached to the boat keeping it from becoming a flying projectile into other vehicles and lanes of traffic.

Take care

Dave

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I replaced the starps on mine with BoatBuckle Retractable Tie-Downs (Overtons.com) that attach to the trailer with a bolt. You then slip the hook onto the boat eye, a couple of quick lifts on the lever, and good to go. You see these on a lot of bass-boat trailers too. Fish like 'em.

brick

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10 years as a firefighter, I have witness many boat, travel trailer, and RV accidents. IMO the straps are more to keep the trailer on the boat! When you look at the weight of the boat (4 to 7 K) vs. the weight of the trailer (1500-1800 lbs), the straps have a much better chance of retaining the trailer to the boat vs. the boat to the trailer.

Let me explain, during normal operation a properly strapped boat will stay put on the trailer under most circumstances. The straps will keep the boat off the back of the towing vehicle during hard/emergency stops and on the trailer during aggressive measures to avoid accidents. Be during an accident or trailer separation from the tow vehicle, boats will most likely flip over and the straps should keep the trailer attached to the boat keeping it from becoming a flying projectile into other vehicles and lanes of traffic.

Great analogy Dave! :clapsmiley:

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Hmmm… this is interesting. My old Bayliner had tie down straps and I saw their importance. When I picked up my new Chap 2 months ago, I noticed that there were U-hooks on the boat but no U-hooks on the boat to strap to. I asked the salesperson and he said they were not necessary. He said on a smaller 17 foot boat like my old Bayliner it was needed but on a 21’6” boat like the Chap… the weight of the boat was enough. I’ve been traveling all around town with only the front winch holding her down. I guess I need to find a way to strap the a$$ end of my Chap to the trailer???

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Hmmm… this is interesting. My old Bayliner had tie down straps and I saw their importance. When I picked up my new Chap 2 months ago, I noticed that there were U-hooks on the boat but no U-hooks on the boat to strap to. I asked the salesperson and he said they were not necessary. He said on a smaller 17 foot boat like my old Bayliner it was needed but on a 21’6” boat like the Chap… the weight of the boat was enough. I’ve been traveling all around town with only the front winch holding her down. I guess I need to find a way to strap the a$$ end of my Chap to the trailer???

You can tell that salesperson that is just B.S.. I was run off the road pulling a 26' foot cruiser once and if I had not had the boat's stern strapped, the boat would of come off that trailer. I have seen several cases were bigger boats than yours have come off their trailers!

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Yea... I always feel weird and a little uneasy just having the winch. I'll take some pics of the back of the trailer/boat and see if you guys have any ideas.

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Hmmm… this is interesting. My old Bayliner had tie down straps and I saw their importance. When I picked up my new Chap 2 months ago, I noticed that there were U-hooks on the boat but no U-hooks on the boat to strap to. I asked the salesperson and he said they were not necessary. He said on a smaller 17 foot boat like my old Bayliner it was needed but on a 21’6” boat like the Chap… the weight of the boat was enough. I’ve been traveling all around town with only the front winch holding her down. I guess I need to find a way to strap the a$$ end of my Chap to the trailer???

I use this, one on the bow securing bow hook to trailer and 2 on the stern. easy to connect no tangles, and tightens easily. I got them for about 20deer each.

boat_buckle.jpg

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I have also seen larger boats fly of the trailer. The worse one I witnessed was a 27 footer that was attached by a front winch strap only. The driver hit a huge, steep bump in the road and as the tongue of the trailer jolted upwards, it broke the winch strap. As the back end of the trailer hit the bump, it caused the boat to bounce and slide right off the trailer. It was driver error as well as the inexperience of strapping down a boat. I have my 260 Signature weighing around 9000lbs (give or take)and the stern is strapped down to the trailer. Why wait for the "one" time for it to happen when you can avoid the whole incident. Tie the stern down.

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I would think that with a larger boat it would be more of a priority. If the situation arises, the bigger boat will want to go where inertia tells it to go. Even more than with a smaller boat. I feel that "better safe than sorry" applies no matter what size boat you have.

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I use this, one on the bow securing bow hook to trailer and 2 on the stern. easy to connect no tangles, and tightens easily. I got them for about 20deer each.

boat_buckle.jpg

+1

I've had 4 different boats and these are the best/most convienient set-up. Birdog - since you don't have any already (hard to believe any dealer could sell a boat without safety straps) I'd definately go with the bolt on version. They save a step at launch and at retreival - and that's valuable time.

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10 years as a firefighter, I have witness many boat, travel trailer, and RV accidents. IMO the straps are more to keep the trailer on the boat! When you look at the weight of the boat (4 to 7 K) vs. the weight of the trailer (1500-1800 lbs), the straps have a much better chance of retaining the trailer to the boat vs. the boat to the trailer.

Let me explain, during normal operation a properly strapped boat will stay put on the trailer under most circumstances. The straps will keep the boat off the back of the towing vehicle during hard/emergency stops and on the trailer during aggressive measures to avoid accidents. However during an accident or trailer separation from the tow vehicle, boats will most likely flip over and the straps should keep the trailer attached to the boat keeping it from becoming a flying projectile into other vehicles and lanes of traffic.

this has been my opinion for a long time. in any kind of emergency maneuver, you want the boat and trailer to act as a unit not two separate items. i have the bow strap, two stern straps, and a strap that goes from my bow cleats toward the rear of the trailer. this strap is to help keep the boat from going forward into the back of the truck in a crash or panic stop. i do release the tension on my straps when the boat is on the trailer at the house. i check and double check a list of items before hitting the road. when we come to a rest stop or fuel stop, i check the straps, bearing temps, and overall condition. haven't found any issues but then it is good to know there aren't any.

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