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Towing Help Needed!

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Lets start with a little history, I have done a good amount of towing, My wife and I had a 240 signature on a trailer that I towed with a 1999 f250 diesel, Cadillac Escalade, and a 3500 Chevy 454. We tow every time we go out. We just purchased a 2003 300 signature cruiser in Florida, trailer kept. Now we have to tow it home and will still keep it on a trailer, I have a ford f250 with the triton V10 (with 200K miles) and was considering a 2007 Tundra 5.7 with 4wd with towing package. Just want some opinions, total weight is around 12000 with fuel and the trailer.

Thanks!! Derek

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Let start with a little history, I have done a good amount of towing, My wife and I had a 240 signature on a trailer that I towed with a 1999 f250 diesel, Cadillac Escalade, and a 3500 Chevy 454. We tow every time we go out. We just purchased a 2003 300 signature cruiser in Florida, trailer kept. Now we have to tow it home and will still keep it on a trailer, I have a ford f250 with the triton V10 (with 200K miles) and was considering a 2007 Tundra 5.7 with 4wd with towing package. Just want some opinions, total weight is around 12000 with fuel and the trailer.

Thanks!! Derek

What is going on today with this site? Keep getting miss posts!

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Derek,

May be worth while to get a shipping cost from a local marina/shipper. When I bought my 256, I considered shipping it from Ct. to Pa. and was very surprised at how reasonable the cost was once you factor in your out of pocket for wear and tear, fuel and lodging. If you are going to do it use your Ford, I think the boat may be a bit much for the Tundra.

Clayton

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I'm thinking one of the makes with a dully diesel, that's a lot of boat for habitual towing.

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I have a friend that would tow his Maxum 3000scr Cruiser (about 12500 pounds) with a 1500 Tahoe and a Lincoln navigator. My tow vehicle has to be my daily driver and most pulls to the lakes we frequent will be less then 1 hour.

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I have a friend that would tow his Maxum 3000scr Cruiser (about 12500 pounds) with a 1500 Tahoe and a Lincoln navigator. My tow vehicle has to be my daily driver and most pulls to the lakes we frequent will be less then 1 hour.

If your friend truly towed a 12,500 lb. boat with a Tahoe, he's completely nuts! That is double the capacity of that truck and would destroy it! Tahoes only have a class III hitch as well which is max 5000 lbs. To tow your 300, you need a dually. You need a class V hitch w/weight distribution. A Tundra is not even close to capable of towing that boat. I have a 2500 diesel and I wouldn't tow that much weight as it's at my limit. Don't forget to add fuel, gear, people, etc. Best bet----keep the boat in a slip.

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I have a friend that would tow his Maxum 3000scr Cruiser (about 12500 pounds) with a 1500 Tahoe and a Lincoln navigator. My tow vehicle has to be my daily driver and most pulls to the lakes we frequent will be less then 1 hour.

This may be so and possible with some vehicles. BUT!!!! if you exceed max recommended towing capacity of a vehicle and get into an accident while towing, I wouldn't be surprised if 1. you get a ticket and 2. your ins. co. doesn't cover it. I'm towing a 9000lb rig behind my F150 which has a max towing capacity of 11300 and I would never consider exceding that tow weight. My previous vehicle was an Expedition with a capacity of 9000 in which I was maxed out and I didn't feel comfortable at all with it back there.

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Welcome to the group...... :oregonian_winesmiley:

Dude you need a 1 ton something single or duelly.......nufff said.......

matt

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That is exactly what I did not what to hear! I want a 2007 Nautical Blue 4wd Double Cab TRD. "my friend" was really a guy that I looked at buying his boat so there is no telling if it was true or not (and it was a Suburban not a Tahoe my fault). Dually is out of the question, it would be nice to have one to tow it home from Florida but not as a daily driver. The boat is a 2003 sig 300, loaded, gen, twin 5.0's says it is 9800 pounds, figured the trailer is about 1500 pounds (aluminum tri-axle) fuel and stuff another 1500 (230 gallons of fuel) does 12000 sound about right?

Check this out!

and this!

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I'm all for max performing a piece of equipment within the bounds of safety, but I think using that Tundra exceeds those bounds. There are multiple parts to towing that I know you know since you've been doing it for so long...pulling, stopping, and controlling. A strong enough drive train can pull very heavy weights so you could beef up that on the Tundra. Good brakes on all trailer axles is gonna be critical to helping your truck's stopping capacity. The boat is going to have to be perfectly positioned on that trailer to make it half safe to pull in a straight line, but get around a semi at highway speeds, or hit a cross wind or make a sudden move (like when someone cuts you off) and that Tundra doesn't have the @SS to control that much weight. I would stick with the F-250 and get a cheap car for daily driving if the gas is killing you that bad. Be sure to do the math on the cheap daily driver though, cause you have to have a big difference in mileage to be able to save money in the end by doing that. You may just have to suck up the mileage if that is your concern. With boats and airplanes, the purchase price is a fairly small piece of the cost of ownership...it's the maintenance and 'accessories' that go along with them that really cost money.

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My current daily driver is a 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona, I guess part of my goal was to have one nice (low miles)tow vehicle/daily driver in stead of two high mileage cars. Not sure I like the idea of towing with a 200k mile f250 on long trips to the beach. Plus one nice truck that does not need anything more then oil changes. f250 had a long list of things it needed and a longer list of things it still needs.

Thanks for all the information! it does seem that everyone that has replied is boating with a bow rider... is there a different forum for signature cruisers?

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I have to agree with everyone here. Way too darn BIG for a Tonka Toyota. Actually I too would want a 1-Ton for a boat that big. Since you have a 3/4 ton already then it may be ok for careful slow speed towing to the local lake, but I'd look to either renting or borrowing an 1-ton truck, or just ship the boat home.

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Food for thought according to the 1999 towing guide http://www.trailerlife.com/images/downloads/99towingguide.pdf is says the "F-250 SuperCab 4WD SD 6.8 V-10 10,800" (says anything over 10k towing is only for goose neck applications)

The Tundra is rated at 10,600 pounds. according to Toyota.

NOT trying to argue! I just want to under stand!

If we are talking fords, in 1999 the only difference between the f250 and f350 is a few extra leaf springs in the rear and the badges and price tag. the f250 has a higher rear bumper tow rating of 500 more because it weighs 500 pounds less. 5th wheel and rating is higher on the f350 because of the heavier springs. (I did my ford research just as I am now doing my tundra research). Again I value everyone's thoughts but but I have not heard from any body pulling a sig yet... I have pulled around a 22' Maxum bow-rider and a Yamaha AR-230HO with an array of different tow vehicles. I guess it's hard to find Sig's on a trailer. :dancinguy:

Thanks!! Derek

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I hope they don't mind me throwing this out, but cj orca/referee77, members in the forum, have a 270 Sig on a triple axel trailer towed by a F350. From what I understand about their boating habits(and great pics by the way) they USE their boat regularly and trailer to different destinations. Wonder why referee hasn't found this post yet? He should be able to give you real world knowledge about trailering a Sig.

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Food for thought according to the 1999 towing guide http://www.trailerlife.com/images/downloads/99towingguide.pdf is says the "F-250 SuperCab 4WD SD 6.8 V-10 10,800" (says anything over 10k towing is only for goose neck applications)

The Tundra is rated at 10,600 pounds. according to Toyota.

NOT trying to argue! I just want to under stand!

If we are talking fords, in 1999 the only difference between the f250 and f350 is a few extra leaf springs in the rear and the badges and price tag. the f250 has a higher rear bumper tow rating of 500 more because it weighs 500 pounds less. 5th wheel and rating is higher on the f350 because of the heavier springs. (I did my ford research just as I am now doing my tundra research). Again I value everyone's thoughts but but I have not heard from any body pulling a sig yet... I have pulled around a 22' Maxum bow-rider and a Yamaha AR-230HO with an array of different tow vehicles. I guess it's hard to find Sig's on a trailer. :dancinguy:

Thanks!! Derek

My daughter's boyfriend owns a body shop. We have discussed the Tundra in the past about the towing capacity. He has seen quite a few Tundras with twisted frame rails and other damage from customers who have maxed out their towing capacity. I'm not knocking the Tundra, i'm just giving info that i've been told. There's no telling what his customers had done to their vehicles or how they drove them.

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My current daily driver is a 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona, I guess part of my goal was to have one nice (low miles)tow vehicle/daily driver in stead of two high mileage cars. Not sure I like the idea of towing with a 200k mile f250 on long trips to the beach. Plus one nice truck that does not need anything more then oil changes. f250 had a long list of things it needed and a longer list of things it still needs.

Thanks for all the information! it does seem that everyone that has replied is boating with a bow rider... is there a different forum for signature cruisers?

There is no separate forum for Signature cursers and the reason you have only gotten answers from bow rider owners is because they tow their boats every weekend and they know what it takes to tow a boat safely. The great majority of Signature owners don’t tow their boats. We keep them in slips! Towing a boat the size of a 300 requires a 60K deer diesel truck and is some states a special permit to have it on the road.

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I would never tow that boat with a Tundra. Way to small of truck. I know where I live you would need a special permit to tow that boat.

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We trailer our 2008 290 Signature. We tow with a F250 6.4L diesel. Tow weight loaded is ~12,200lbs. During the season, we tow routinely each weekend. We also tow occasionally up to 300 miles on extended holidays.

I wouldn't attempt to tow this weight with anything less than a diesel-powered F250-class vehicle. Dodge and GM both make equally-capable vehicles in this class (Duramax and Cummins powered).

I'm happy to share specifics of our tow setup (brakes, WD hitch, etc) if you're interested.

038.jpg

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Doesn't the 300 Signature have wider than 8'6 beam? If so, you need permits to trailer it in most states.

Our 290 has a 10' beam. In our state, a simple per-year permit is required. There are no stipulations as to travel days or routes. If you exceed 12' width, things get more restrictive and costly.

For us, height is as great a concern as width. At 13' 8" tall without the sat dome, low hanging limbs and telephone lines in rural areas is an ever present issue. Stay where your 18 wheel counterparts travel and generally things are just fine.

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Doesn't the 300 Signature have wider than 8'6 beam? If so, you need permits to trailer it in most states.

The beam of the 300 is 10'3'', gonna have to check with the DMV of your state(s) you're planning to travel to/thru about permits once you figure out what to pull it with. CYA for liability purposes in the event something should happen.

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I think Stephenm27's got the towing down, and has done the research...

2500_comparison_chart.jpg

Keep in mind, those max towing numbers in the chart are 5th wheel towing. Conventional hitch is lower

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Keep in mind, those max towing numbers in the chart are 5th wheel towing. Conventional hitch is lower

I suspect we'll see all these numbers change (perhaps dramatically) when SAE J-2807 conformance is tested beginning in MY 2013. If you're not familiar with J-2807, it's a standards-based approach to testing/confirming tow ratings on vehicles. See here for a brief blurb and links to further info.

To date, testing and subsequent tow rating has been left completely to the manufacturers--and using conditions that most benefit their ratings. In nearly any competitive circumstance, that's a conflict of interest.

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You have to look at the door stickers since options play a big part on the ##'s ie crew cap + 4wd lowers the numbers.

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