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shrffdpty

Towing Help Needed!

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Thanks for ALL the info BOWS and SIGS! I am very glad to hear every opinion! I live in NC, I called the DMV and asked about trailering (Trialering may not be a word but it should!) the boat and they said as long as long as I'm not doing it commercially (for profit) that they really don't have time to mess around with pulling over recreational boaters. :banana2: I would like to here the specs on your towing apparatus stephenm27!

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All I can say is God bless anyone that finds towing these types of weights anything short of frightening. :o

I used to tow half this amount and HATED IT! (even with the proper tow set-up). :huh:

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I would like to here the specs on your towing apparatus stephenm27!

I'm using a weight-distributing Pro Series SC (Reese/DrawTite) rated at 15K lbs gross trailer weight. The weight-distributing equalizer spring bars require the installation of a "pole tongue adapter" that mimics the spread normally afforded by an A-frame trailer (e.g. RV travel trailers). It sounds odd, but its a simple bolt-on affair that enables the equalizer bars to perform as-designed.

The aluminum trailer itself is rated at 15K lbs gross with it weighing in at about 1800 lbs unloaded. I converted the triple axle disc brakes to electric-over-hydraulic (formerly surge) using a Dexter actuator unit. This allows the integrated brake controller in the F250 to be utilized without modifications and rids the setup of the clunky surge coupler on the trailer. The hitch ball is a 2 5/16" rated at 14K lbs.

Lastly, I'll offer the following bits of "wisdom" that I have gained from the experience of "towing heavy" with our Sig:

--Surge brakes aren't appropriate for controlling this size load in emergency situations; the cost to convert to EOH is likely less than the cost of your insurance deductible when your surge brakes under-perform at the worst possible time.

--The torque afforded by a diesel powerplant is most comforting when crawling up a slick, wet launch ramp with 12K lbs behind you that would like to remain in the lake.

--A trailer spare tire(s) is the best insurance against a flat, especially at this weight.

--A safety chain on the bow eye attached to the bow stop is highly recommended. I attach it before pulling up the ramp as once UV degrades the winch strap sufficiently, it'll snap likely as you are climbing that slick, wet incline. With wet bunks and the weight of twins in the rear, there's a good chance things are going to go south in a hurry if the strap breaks during pull out.

Let me know if I've missed anything specifically that you're interested in re our setup/experiences...

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I'm using a weight-distributing Pro Series SC (Reese/DrawTite) rated at 15K lbs gross trailer weight. The weight-distributing equalizer spring bars require the installation of a "pole tongue adapter" that mimics the spread normally afforded by an A-frame trailer (e.g. RV travel trailers). It sounds odd, but its a simple bolt-on affair that enables the equalizer bars to perform as-designed.

The aluminum trailer itself is rated at 15K lbs gross with it weighing in at about 1800 lbs unloaded. I converted the triple axle disc brakes to electric-over-hydraulic (formerly surge) using a Dexter actuator unit. This allows the integrated brake controller in the F250 to be utilized without modifications and rids the setup of the clunky surge coupler on the trailer. The hitch ball is a 2 5/16" rated at 14K lbs.

Lastly, I'll offer the following bits of "wisdom" that I have gained from the experience of "towing heavy" with our Sig:

--Surge brakes aren't appropriate for controlling this size load in emergency situations; the cost to convert to EOH is likely less than the cost of your insurance deductible when your surge brakes under-perform at the worst possible time.

--The torque afforded by a diesel powerplant is most comforting when crawling up a slick, wet launch ramp with 12K lbs behind you that would like to remain in the lake.

--A trailer spare tire(s) is the best insurance against a flat, especially at this weight.

--A safety chain on the bow eye attached to the bow stop is highly recommended. I attach it before pulling up the ramp as once UV degrades the winch strap sufficiently, it'll snap likely as you are climbing that slick, wet incline. With wet bunks and the weight of twins in the rear, there's a good chance things are going to go south in a hurry if the strap breaks during pull out.

Let me know if I've missed anything specifically that you're interested in re our setup/experiences...

I strongly concur with your comments on the bow safety chain or strap. A few years ago I was 3/4 up a very steep ramp and I didn't hook my safety strap. My winch strap broke loose and my boat slid 1/2 way off the trailer! It was a miracle that the boat didn't end up on the concrete!!! Needless to say, I'm very careful to ensure my safety strap is securely attached and my winch strap is in good shape before starting up the ramp.

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Yep all very good info. If you are not towing a huge distance you can get away with very little. We tow a sig 240 with a chevy tahoe 1500. Remember that all the towing info from the dealer and in the handbook is for warranty only.In Canada the only stipulation is the GVW on the vehicle axles.If you are under on all your axles and under on your total GVW of your vehicle you are fine. Of course all this is based on a tow vehicle in good shape and not looking like it just got pulled out of a wrecking yard. In Canada surge brakes are illegal over 6500 lbs. My boat is 5650 according to the handbook(dry) the trailer is good for 8000 lbs and it weighs 1400 lbs The whole boat/trailer combo tips the scales at 7253 lbs. Truck pulls it okay, does not sway. I only tow max. 2 hours most times 20 mins.

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I'm using a weight-distributing Pro Series SC (Reese/DrawTite) rated at 15K lbs gross trailer weight. The weight-distributing equalizer spring bars require the installation of a "pole tongue adapter" that mimics the spread normally afforded by an A-frame trailer (e.g. RV travel trailers). It sounds odd, but its a simple bolt-on affair that enables the equalizer bars to perform as-designed.

The aluminum trailer itself is rated at 15K lbs gross with it weighing in at about 1800 lbs unloaded. I converted the triple axle disc brakes to electric-over-hydraulic (formerly surge) using a Dexter actuator unit. This allows the integrated brake controller in the F250 to be utilized without modifications and rids the setup of the clunky surge coupler on the trailer. The hitch ball is a 2 5/16" rated at 14K lbs.

Lastly, I'll offer the following bits of "wisdom" that I have gained from the experience of "towing heavy" with our Sig:

--Surge brakes aren't appropriate for controlling this size load in emergency situations; the cost to convert to EOH is likely less than the cost of your insurance deductible when your surge brakes under-perform at the worst possible time.

--The torque afforded by a diesel powerplant is most comforting when crawling up a slick, wet launch ramp with 12K lbs behind you that would like to remain in the lake.

--A trailer spare tire(s) is the best insurance against a flat, especially at this weight.

--A safety chain on the bow eye attached to the bow stop is highly recommended. I attach it before pulling up the ramp as once UV degrades the winch strap sufficiently, it'll snap likely as you are climbing that slick, wet incline. With wet bunks and the weight of twins in the rear, there's a good chance things are going to go south in a hurry if the strap breaks during pull out.

Let me know if I've missed anything specifically that you're interested in re our setup/experiences...

agree with all of the above. i would recommend more than one spare. also strip down the hubs and bearings every year and clean and check and grease. always check tire pressure at least once a day.

we have a 2005 Sig290. i have had it on a moving company scales in the past. she weighs about 12,000 with full water and 1/3 tank of fuel and the other stuff on board. the trailer weight about 1,500. that is a tow weight of about 13,500. i have a 2005 Dodge diesel dually. we have towed up to Chesapeake Bay and down to West Palm Beach Fl before. Bob is correct, it is not for the faint of heart. you have to be very aware and careful of your following distances. we usually tow 3 -5 cruises per year with a number of other similar boats. other times she stays in a slip where we use her nearly every weekend all year long. we plan to spend this coming weekend on the boat. days will be nice but the nights will be in high teens lower twenties. HVAC will get a workout.

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I pull my 276 sig with a 2007 Ford F250 6.0 powerstroke useing a weight dist hitch then new hitchn made a MAJOR DIFFERENCE we pull every weekend around home and 2 or 3 times a year to destin Fl. Also I have an electric winch with bow chains and 2 transom straps, when we get on the interstate I add a full strap across the dive platform just to be safe.

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I hope they don't mind me throwing this out, but cj orca/referee77, members in the forum, have a 270 Sig on a triple axel trailer towed by a F350. From what I understand about their boating habits(and great pics by the way) they USE their boat regularly and trailer to different destinations. Wonder why referee hasn't found this post yet? He should be able to give you real world knowledge about trailering a Sig.

Here we are !!!

sorry... missed this one.....

Our 2008 Sig 270 (Single engine) LOADED is prob pushing close to 10,000lbs... so a Sig 300 with twin engines loaded is gonna exceed our boat....

I think you'll be stretching the limits of the Tundra....I wouldn't go anything less that a Dodge/Chev/Ford 3500/350 diesel or what ever.... prob don't need to go dully... but if ya can afford to ... why not...

boattruck.jpg

(love your new boat btw....)

We trailer every weekend during the season. Both locally & in to Washington. This year we are heading in the BC interior - a 4-5 hr drive - thru 1 major Mt pass...be a good test for our Ford !! ;)

(we shipped our boat from Chicago to Blaine, WA - cost about 2300 loonies)

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Awesome... I have officially been talked out of the Tundra. :glare: I guess I will keep the F-250 v10 until I find a a deal on a diesel! Thanks again, love all the pictures!

shrffdpty :banana2:

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HELP!! Now I Have a problem, hate to bring this tread back alive, however the ford v 10 is sold!! Now I have to find a worthy diesel tow vehicle and I am driving my self nuts shopping! Opinions needed! Here is what I have learned. (Towing 13000 pound chaparral 300 on a tri-axle trailer)

1999-2003 7.3 Ford Diesels are great with possibly crappy transmissions.

2004- current 6.0 and 6.4 and 6.7 Fords have crappy (lots of research has been done!) engines and great transmissions!.

Duramax is Isuzu and made in Mexico. ?? Allison transmissions are wonderful ???

And Dodge trucks need a spare transmission in the bed of it just to make it 100 miles…

Hope this does not offend! I am just confused and driving myself NUTZ. I need a Diesel 4X4, crew-cab, AUTOMATIC, prefer 2000 or newer and 150K miles or less and $18000 or less… why is it so hard!?!

:(

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Diesel will run the price up on you.

My 2008 Dodge 2500 4x4 crewcab heavy duty with 5.7L hemi does a fair job. I can not tell my boat is back there. Your rig (5000 more #) I would know it. :) I paid under 20 heard.

You may want to a dually if you tow long distance.

Try this link

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Had a 2006 2500 GMC with a duramax and Allison tranny. That truck was great and never had a moments problem with it. I could pull the 27 foot cruiser I had and it was almost like it wasn't back there. I would still be driving it, but sold the cruiser that I was towing and didn't need to have the 2500 any longer. Also it was about the time that fuel went up. I have talked to a lot of folks that have the GMC 2500/3500 and have never heard of any negative about the motor or tranny.

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I to am interested in what some of the opinions are also. Looking to upgrade the tow rig this year so just doing my homework now.

For those who may know, most of the 2500 Ram diesels I have seen listed for sale are straight 6's. How do these perform for tow duty and are the V8 diesel's somewhat rare in the Ram 2500 lineup.

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I'm thinking about a 2500 crew caw Dodge with the Cummings diesel. just hard to find under $20K.

Did you not just post "Dodge trucks need a spare transmission in the bed of it just to make it 100 miles" ?

With that said, and I agree for the very reason you stated and you are considering one?

You completely contradicted yourself in the same thread. ???

Get a Ford Powerstroke Diesel and worry no more.

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We've had ZERO problems with our 2003 F-350 towing our Sig 270... no tranny problems, no engine problems... nuthin' !

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The Fords have always been solid, Chevy/ GMC seem to be catching up though. Dodge has always had the engine, but can't seem to figure out the rest of the truck. :Twocents:

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We tow with an OLD dodge diesel,1993! We bought it because I found an unmolested one that only had 105,000km on it. Great truck if you want to fix the little things that pop up on an older truck. We have a camper on it and this past summer took the package to Manitoba, about 1500 miles round trip. At 17,000lb (total) we were pretty maxed out for that year/version of Diesel (235hp). At work we have a handfull of 7.3 Diesel Fords and they are great, including the transmissions. They are also really hard to find with low milage if you want to buy one. We also have three 6.0 Ford Powerstrokes, two of them have had head gaskets replaced (over a 10,000 dollar repair) and I fully expect that we may have the other one go.. I seriously would not recommend a 6.0 to anyone. Our old dodge is an extended cab 5 speed manuel two wheel drive, and unfortunately our 9 year old keeps growing.. at some point we will want a four door. I am realy leaning toward a newer Dodge, althought the couple Duramax's we have have been good, other than the interiour fixtures..(seats etc) I would like to keep the camper, and a long box 4 door is starting to become rare as well...

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You very seldom see Toyotas pulling anything heavy. There is a reason for that. You can't go wrong with trucks built Ford Tough.

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The Fords have always been solid.

Except for that 6.0 era! It's funny how many more problems ford had than International. For those that don't know, International made the engine, and they put it in their trucks as well. Thats what happens when Ford has to up the power numbers of a already potent engine to compete with GM and dodge.

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Except for that 6.0 era! It's funny how many more problems ford had than International. For those that don't know, International made the engine, and they put it in their trucks as well. Thats what happens when Ford has to up the power numbers of a already potent engine to compete with GM and dodge.

I left the Ford dealer I worked at for 11 years when the 6.0 hit the floor, had big issues, they should have stuck with the NAVISTAR 7.3 Powerstroke.

Navistar bought International (formerly I Harvester)

Open the hood and check the valve cover label. :)

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I left the Ford dealer I worked at for 11 years when the 6.0 hit the floor, had big issues, they should have stuck with the NAVISTAR 7.3 Powerstroke.

Navistar bought International (formerly I Harvester)

Open the hood and check the valve cover label. :)

I stand corrected. Either way, the 6.0 makes a great accessory (anchor) for a Chap.

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The new Ford 6.7 is all made in house. The 7.3 was the last good motor Navistar built for the Super duties. Avoid the 6.0 at all costs. The 6.4 in the 2008-2010 models isn't "bad", but not great. The one problem with the 6.7 now is the turbo design. They tried a new hybrid twin design with them back to back and it doesn't seem to build as much power as the new Duramax in the GM's do for 2011. I'm a Ford guy through and through, but I think right now the 2011 Duramax is king for diesels. Fords will catch up though as they keep improving their in house diesel.

If you don't want a Diesel, the 5.7 Hemi is a great Gas motor as well as the Ford 6.8 V10 or the new 6.2 motor. The GM gas motors are nothing to write home about. Toyota? They should stick to making the Camry and Prius. The Tundra is a POS.

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