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Chip

Is 4' deep enough?

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Have a buddy that has a lake house and wants me to bring my boat over a take the kids tubing. The only problem is that around the boat dock its around 4' deep. I have a 216.

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It will be just fine, just raise the drive up a little when your close to the dock. Make sure you're in a little deeper water when you give it the gas.

matt

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Sort of related:

At what size/weight boat do you have to worry about the water level? Say your 256, would you float it up to a 4ft deep dock? I was also wondering where Chap installs their depth finder sensors? When it says 4ft does that mean 4 ft from the bottom of the hull or the drive? I'm asking so when I go to beach my next boat I know what depth I should start raising the out-drive and what depths I should avoid altogether if running along.

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It's depth from the bottom of the hull. Your 'draft' is probably three feet, allowing for the lower unit.

Your depth finder should have a 'keel offset' feature, which you can set yourself. Mine is set at three feet. Therefore, the depth of the water is actually three feet deeper than what the gauge reads. There should also be a 'shallow water alarm' feature, which you can also set at whatever depth you want.

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Three feet is about right. For exact #'s check out the specs of the boat on the website and it gives you the draft with drve up and down.

Most sterndrive boats need 30 - 40 inches draft with drive down.

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I can get my 256 into about 2.5 feet of water on the DG (have 2 younger kids, so I like to keep it shallow for them) with the outdrive trimmed up a bit, but that's only if the bottom is sand, I know the area and the tide is coming in. Otherwise I try to anchor in 2.5 to 3 feet of water. Outdrive sits about 20" lower then the lowest part of my hull when down. It stirs it up a bit, so I always go very slow. Once you learn your boat, you'll know where and where not to go. Of course there's always the potential for that submerged rock or log, but that boating IMO.

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Now as the lake levels continue to drop i've been paying closer attention to my draft and the specs.

When the specification says Draft Down - are they saying trimmed all the way down - same thing Draft Up -trimmed all the way up (not in trailer storage/towing mode)?

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Now as the lake levels continue to drop i've been paying closer attention to my draft and the specs.

When the specification says Draft Down - are they saying trimmed all the way down - same thing Draft Up -trimmed all the way up (not in trailer storage/towing mode)?

when on plane, the trim limit takes the lower drive up only a few inches to keep water flowing and prevent cavitation. when you are put put-ing around even in the full trailer position your drive is in the water and can prevent you from dragging the skeg, once clear of the shallows lower the drive. - you do lose maneuvering w/ drive up all the way but i do this when moving away from the shallow beach area, never more than just putting it into gear. your depth alarm will help it is measured from the transducer on the bottom of the hull. mine is set to 2 feet.

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NEVER EVER have your engine running - EVEN IDLING - if you drive is up past the operating trim limit. This line is about 3/4 of the way DOWN (towards the bottom) of a typical trim gauge. That means that the majority of the trim gauge should never be utilized with the engine on unless you enjoy replacing your u-joints...

As for depth those above already covered the fact that you can operate a full sized boat (such as my 310) in 3.5 ft of water with the dept gauge showing one or two feet below the keel... It's not the wisest decision as it increases the chances of ingesting sand and silt and tearing up your raw water impeller but it can be done without damage to the drive components.

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NEVER EVER have your engine running - EVEN IDLING - if you drive is up past the operating trim limit. This line is about 3/4 of the way DOWN (towards the bottom) of a typical trim gauge. That means that the majority of the trim gauge should never be utilized with the engine on unless you enjoy replacing your u-joints...

As for depth those above already covered the fact that you can operate a full sized boat (such as my 310) in 3.5 ft of water with the dept gauge showing one or two feet below the keel... It's not the wisest decision as it increases the chances of ingesting sand and silt and tearing up your raw water impeller but it can be done without damage to the drive components.

The BIII doesn't really have an upper trim limit. It doesn't seem to hurt anything to start the engine with the outdrive in the up position. With that said, I still don't.

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I've done it a couple of times by accident without any obvious damage. But I was sure mad at myself for starting the engine while in trailer mode. I personally think that I can hear extra vibration when it's up, indicating that the unit is under stress.

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I've done it a couple of times by accident without any obvious damage. But I was sure mad at myself for starting the engine while in trailer mode. I personally think that I can hear extra vibration when it's up, indicating that the unit is under stress.

Don't have a trailer mode or limit stop. The trim switches move the drives all the way to full up. Also the keys have to be on to move the drives. The past boats with Alpha drives did have a limit they would hit and then you used a trailer switch to raise to full up. You could raise the drives with the trailer switch with key off.

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Look at universal joint. Gears are in lower unit, it doesn't matter if you are in neutral or not. You don't want run engine with drive in trailer position.

147sei116completefullsize__56873__81277_zoom.jpgBravo_3_Sterndrive.jpg

Best way to measure your boat draft is when it is on the trailer with drive down, unwashed. Measure distance to ground from scum line, then to ground from lower point of skeg and substruct measurements. Mine is exactly 2 ft. Transducer is installed 1 ft deep when boat is in water displacement mode, so deph finder correction is set to -1 ft. Dephfinder alarm is set to 4ft.

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If you draft 23 inches with your outdrive up, then three feet of water is fine.

But the point that I think some people miss is that if the water starts to churn a bit (wind or boat traffic causing waves toward shore) and you see swells start to rise and fall, then your three feet of water will fluctuate between maybe one foot and maybe four feet with the swells.

Don't leave your boat moored in water based solely on your draft and the depth. Give yourself enough depth to account for the rocking up and down with the swells. You don't want your boat and/or lower unit bouncing off the bottom of the lake all night long.

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I watch the not-so-boat-savvy people leave popular anchoring areas with their drives trailered and wonder why they can't plane out... Now THAT scares me whenever I see a boat for sale sign.... LOL

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No problem with my 290 in about 2 1/2 to 3 ft of water trimmed all of the way down at a extremely low speed. I was used to that depth in my last slip for 4 yrs so it was OK at the speeds one would either leave the dock or come back in.

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Unfortunately, you learn you minimal draft by that nice heart breaking sound from you stern... And then by paying 50 deers to Marina for prop service. At least I did it several times in my first year of boating :blush:

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