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Icedawg

Tube Towing Warning

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Recently got a 215SSI and loving it. Soon my son wants to tube off of the boat but I noticed that by the ski rope eyelet area there is a warning sign that reads "Using ski eye for towing, lifting, or parasaiiling will result in damage to boat and severe personal injury. Use only to pull waterskier"....The lifting and the parasailing part I understand but towing.... are they refering to towing another boat or towing as in rafting/tube etc. Also, not sure if this matters but my boat has a swim platforms (not sure it's because of a clearance issue with the ski tow rope.....

Thanks,

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Recently got a 215SSI and loving it. Soon my son wants to tube off of the boat but I noticed that by the ski rope eyelet area there is a warning sign that reads "Using ski eye for towing, lifting, or parasaiiling will result in damage to boat and severe personal injury. Use only to pull waterskier"....The lifting and the parasailing part I understand but towing.... are they refering to towing another boat or towing as in rafting/tube etc. Also, not sure if this matters but my boat has a swim platforms (not sure it's because of a clearance issue with the ski tow rope.....

Thanks,

The towing eye area on my boat had stress cracks around it from previous owner towing a tube. That area is way above the the thick part of the transom, above the hull / upper deck joint and just part of the upper deck "thin" glass and flexes when pulled hard. There was a backing plate on it, but thru time, it loosened (bent) and allowed the immediate area to flex to some degree. The stresses of a tube are far greater than those of a skier, from what I have read on the manufacturer / vendor websites. I fixed the cracks and had a very heavy duty 4" wide x 3/16" thick S/S backing plate made that spans the entire transom width (grab rails bolt thru it too) and I installed and epoxied it to fill any gaps between it and the transom. Quite solid now.

From what I have read, the stress of a single skier can get up to 1,000 pounds when turns and such are hit, but a tube w/ a couple of people on it can get up towards 4,000 pounds.

I use the Ski-Tow ring for skiers, but use a "Y" bridle connected to the transome tie down rings for the tubing. Never have a problem now.

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I would think that if you were going to pull a small kid on a tube you would be good, but put someone large and the stress will really increase. I would do like Pops did and add backing.

Welcome to the forum Icedawg . We are glad you are here and believe that you will find answers to a lot of your questions. We also provide some humor, of course at no charge to you other than the initiation fee you paid to join this forum ;)

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For what it is worth. My 215SSi already has a backing plate, I believe the Fiberglass is thicker, and the bar is mounted on 4 different areas in the back. I have been pulling tubes for about 5 years now and have no damage what so ever. I am 285 and get back there on occasion with my wife driving. I am sure I am at the upper end of the duty cycle for all equpement involved and everything seems to be fine. I would not be concerned about putting water toys behind the 215SSi.

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After seeing this topic, I doubled checked my backing as well. I have a 256 ssi and it has a metal plate and looks very secure from the back. I have been towing the gang 21 and younger on dual tubes for a while and no issues.

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The towing eye area on my boat had stress cracks around it from previous owner towing a tube. That area is way above the the thick part of the transom, above the hull / upper deck joint and just part of the upper deck "thin" glass and flexes when pulled hard. There was a backing plate on it, but thru time, it loosened (bent) and allowed the immediate area to flex to some degree. The stresses of a tube are far greater than those of a skier, from what I have read on the manufacturer / vendor websites. I fixed the cracks and had a very heavy duty 4" wide x 3/16" thick S/S backing plate made that spans the entire transom width (grab rails bolt thru it too) and I installed and epoxied it to fill any gaps between it and the transom. Quite solid now.

From what I have read, the stress of a single skier can get up to 1,000 pounds when turns and such are hit, but a tube w/ a couple of people on it can get up towards 4,000 pounds.

I use the Ski-Tow ring for skiers, but use a "Y" bridle connected to the transome tie down rings for the tubing. Never have a problem now.

Pops... do you have a picture of this setup ? Thanks.

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Pops... do you have a picture of this setup ? Thanks.

I didn't take pics of either. Which setup, the bridle or S/S backing plate? Plate just goes entire width of transom area, on the inside, and Ski Ring and grab rails bolt thru it. I don't have pics, but in the included pic, the plate traverses the entire internal area outlined in RED.

The bridle is just made of 1/2" Nylon line w/ a loop in the center and a snap hook on each end. I covered the bridle w/ foam "noodles" that kids use in the pool, so it floats. If you make 1, it should be 2 - 3 times the width of the boat in length. I use it for USCGAux towing also, since I made to the Aux specs for a "Facility".

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This thread has raised my eyebrows. I have a 2011 216 SSi with an OEM tower. I've been pulling tubers (no more than 2 at a time) using my tower. Should I be using a different tow point? If so, where?

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The guy who did my demonstration ride with me when I took delivery of our 226 said only use the tower for towing skiers and wakeboarding. He said use the one at the at the rear of the boat for tubing.

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I've got a 2008 190SSI. While I don't have enough hours on it yet to report with any long term success, I can say for certain that a transom hook bridle setup would not work on my boat. The factory swim platform would prevent any bridle attachment for towing, so the only possible point for towing tubes is the one with the warning labelled "for waterskiers only"!!

I did have a look though and the fiberglass does appear to be thicker at the hook and there is an aluminum (?) backing plate sandwiched unded the washers that sit below the securing nuts.

Looks fairly secure to me. I would never opt for the wakeboard tower as a tow point for towable toys.

Sean

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