catalanc

Water in Gas Tank ... How badly did I screw up

19 posts in this topic

Went out today for a nice cruise (couple of hours). Got home and was washing off the boat when I saw that I did not replace the gas cap after my fill up this morning. It would be my guess that water got into the tank ... how much, who knows. No engine problems at all during the cruise. Ran like a champ the whole time. I added fuel stabilizer when I realized this. Will this keep things ok? What to do now? Will the water separator remove it? Should I drain the tank? How does one do this?

Suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

cec

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Ok for us old timers...What was the stuff I (we) use to put in the gas tanks or air-brake-lines in the winter to Keep from freezing?

put that in there too..

matt

I just remembered....HEET... put some of that in there..

matt

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I would pull the water seperator and pour in a jar to see if there is water.

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yes, i will pull the water separator tomorrow. if there is no water in it can i just put it back in or should I get a new one. also, was out in puget sound today - salt water. i always flush really well afterwards, but am a bit leery to do this now until i check for water in the gas. so - how bad is it to leave the engine with salt water in it overnight?

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A couple of things for you, since i had the similiar issue. If you want a total piece of mind you can drain the entire tank bone dry.

But this is a very dangerous task and the area needs to be totally well ventilated. I used a fuel pump (not the ideal setup) to get the

tank dry. I finished it off using a shaker hose. This is the best option but requires alot of muscle as the tank drains.So pick your poison.

Or you can try this method:

Next, dump the contents of the water seperators in a clear glass jar. Give the contents a couple hours to sit before dumping it as the water takes a while to settle. The gas will be on he top and water on the bottom. Then you can go from there.

Best of luck.

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+1 on what other said, but I'll bet your going to be fine and are imagining the worst case like people always do. Unless your spraying right at it I would think it would be tough to get that much water in the filler the way they are designed. Carry a couple of spare fuel water separator just in case. If you don't need it great, use it in the fall when you winterize If you do have to replace it make sure you have a rag handy and ventilate the engine compartment really well before starting again. I would leave the hatch open and have everyone standing away from it until I knew I had cleared all the fuel vapor from the swap.

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yes, i will pull the water separator tomorrow. if there is no water in it can i just put it back in or should I get a new one. also, was out in puget sound today - salt water. i always flush really well afterwards, but am a bit leery to do this now until i check for water in the gas. so - how bad is it to leave the engine with salt water in it overnight?

As you have not run the engine since the water introduction, you won't find water in the filter/separator as the fuel pump has not pulled it out of the tank yet. I would pull the suction line and anti-siphon valve off the tank, hook up a portable gasoline hand pump on to the tank outlet with a short piece of fuel line and a couple clamps and pump it into a small gas can. Make sure the bow is elevated slightly so any water will run toward the tank suction pick-up. Pump out any water, and load up on Marine Stabil at 4-times the normal dosage. Carry a spare filter/separator and tools during your future trips. Try not to move the boat around as you don't want the gas and water to mix. The trick would have been not to add the Stabil until after you got the water out as you want the water to stay separated as much as possible until you suck it out of there. DO NOT introduce gas line anti-freeze (HEET) which is Methanol and is hard on Marine fuel injectors and electric fuel pumps. Old school stuff on new engines is not always a good idea.

W

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Wingnut hit it. As to not flushing your engine one day: don't lose sleep over it. It'll be fine. Hy

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I really love this site. Thanks for all the great advise and suggestions. So, here is what happened. Since the engine was running fine at the end of the day and upon reflection I do not think that I got much water in the tank during my spray off, I took a big breath and started up the engine. Started fine, no sputtering, no white smoke. Ran it for about 15-20 minutes ... no problem. Took out the water separator and emptied ... no water. Replaced it and ran again for 10 minutes. I think that all is good, though probably won't feel totally calm until she is out on the water, bouncing around with no sputters.

Thanks again for all your help.

carlos

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OK - final situation. took the boat out twice this weekend into some pretty good chop once and a while. boat moving around quite a bit so if there were any significant water in the gas tank i should have picked up some. no indication of any coughing or hesitation with the engine so i think i am in the clear. thanks again for all your help and suggestions.

cec

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Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment Gas Additive "... breaks down fuel sludge and allows water to be dispersed throughout the fuel as sub-micron sized droplets that can be eliminated as the engine operates while also cleaning the entire fuel delivery system."

9401.1.jpg

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Leo, I see this stuff everywhere, , does it really work? I hate this e-gas. gona be the curse from #$^% if i'm rite. it not only reeks havock in marine, but a lot of small engines as well. that lil voice in my head is wondering Who ius going to pay for all the damages this stuff is sure to cause?

Just a thought

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that lil voice in my head is wondering Who ius going to pay for all the damages this stuff is sure to cause?

As usually, we will.

I always add it when fueling. Main function of it is to break water film (like soap) and disperse water droplets. They claim if stabilizes fuel as well, but I add fuel stabilizer for that.

This is first product on market from Star Brite since introduction of E10 crap gas on US market, it was specifically designed to solve water related problems.

Problem with E10 in marine environment is that tank construction is different. Marine tanks have vents and open to athmosphere. Ethanol absorbs water. When E10 can absorbs 1% of water on it, water starts separating. The only way to deal with it make water droplets as small as possible, then they are harmless for engine.

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OK this is about as embarrassing as it gets but my wife added 5 to 10 gallons of water to the gas tank before realizing. Tank is 140 gallons. I'm thinking no choice but to have a service come out and pump the 60 gallons that were left in it at the time? Any other ideas?

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Thats alot of gas and water to play with. Might be expensive but go with your original plan and get it pumped out.

Al

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When I purchased my 240 it had been sitting on a lot for over a year. The dealer called the Hazmat team to pump the tank dry to replace with fresh gas before even starting the engine. My guess is that this is your best bet. While probably pricey, it will be much less than a damaged engine ...

:(

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OK this is about as embarrassing as it gets but my wife added 5 to 10 gallons of water to the gas tank before realizing. Tank is 140 gallons. I'm thinking no choice but to have a service come out and pump the 60 gallons that were left in it at the time? Any other ideas?

ok, I will catch he-ll from the group on this but my wife did me the same favor and put at least 20 gallons in a 90 gallon tank, thought she was doing me a favor and we got a good laugh about it. we also bought a perko locking gas cap so it would not happen again.

The correct answeris take it to your dealer so he can hose you a while, I got a battery operated kerosene pump, took off the fuel sender and pumped the stuff into a 35 gal. plastic drum, make sure you suck off the bottom.myself and the neighbors used it as weed killer since it was so watered down,worked good. better than ortho.

chit happens,

http://www.wholesalemarine.com/p/PKO-525DP0BLK/Perko+Fuel+Fill+Locking+Insert.html

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