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vtjim345

Anchoring for an overnight stay

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I have the same 27' 250 and have 25+ feet of chain. I upgraded from stock due to iffy holding in water over 30 ft deep. Ok to have less if shallow.

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I am not a fan of beaching any boat. Sand is just like sandpaper. I would anchor it.

brick

+1. No beaching, but using a fixed object on land to secure one lind to, with an anchor or two in deep water is a good idea.

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We went to 75' chain with 150' rope rode after losing the original anchor to a bottom obstruction. With the factory supplied rode (~20 feet of chain?), we routinely would drag anchor in moderate to high winds, especially with the canvas up. In contrast, we have yet to drag anchor after having transitioned to the nearly all-chain rode. Proper scope is really important, but the chain helps ensure the shallow departure angle of the rode from the lake/ocean bottom is maintained which enables plow-type anchors to continuously dig in. And, in a pinch, putting all the chain on the bottom will allow you to cheat and use less scope.

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I use a Fortress FX7 anchor, which always sets quickly and has great holding power. Never had much luck with a Danforth.

brick

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I use a Fortress FX7 anchor, which always sets quickly and has great holding power. Never had much luck with a Danforth.

brick

What's the difference?

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I said use a ground anchor. In about 4' of water. I beached my boat once. I hope to never do it again. A ground anchor has 3' of 3/8 rod with loop on end. You screw it in the ground as deep as you can and it isn't going anywhere, hence marking it with a white bouy.

I've done the same in Northern Michigan. Mine is 4' screwed into the sandbar. It has survived 3-4 ft waves without issues. (30' 1/2" line with a SS shackle eye of the ground anchor and a SS snap hook to the bow eye) Everyone around me kept breaking free. Couple of guys asked what I was using and headed to the farm and fleet store and bought themselves one. Once its set it doesn't matter about wind direction. I run a line to shore from the stern during the day but allow it to swing freely at night so the bow is always into the waves.

If you ever get washed ashore you will figure out how much your boat really weighs. They are hard to get off the shore.

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I've done the same in Northern Michigan. Mine is 4' screwed into the sandbar. It has survived 3-4 ft waves without issues. (30' 1/2" line with a SS shackle eye of the ground anchor and a SS snap hook to the bow eye) Everyone around me kept breaking free. Couple of guys asked what I was using and headed to the farm and fleet store and bought themselves one. Once its set it doesn't matter about wind direction. I run a line to shore from the stern during the day but allow it to swing freely at night so the bow is always into the waves.

If you ever get washed ashore you will figure out how much your boat really weighs. They are hard to get off the shore.

It may be 4', and you can sleep easy. The tire tube bungee allows you to almost no scope. It's cool to watch out work. We use the tire tube to tie to bridge from above add well. It keeps the rope from yanking the cleat out in the choppy waters. I do use the SS clips, makes it easy to come and go. I keep a 3' 1" wooden broom stick to screw in the ground anchor as deep and long as I can breath. Just remember, it's 3 times as hard to get out,

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Okay, so my 15' of chain is seemingly too little. Is there an effective way to add chain to chain? I presume They make a linkage of some sort? Or do I have to scrap my brand new 15' and have a new 30' cut at West Marine?

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Okay, so my 15' of chain is seemingly too little. Is there an effective way to add chain to chain? I presume They make a linkage of some sort? Or do I have to scrap my brand new 15' and have a new 30' cut at West Marine?

I do think WM may have a linkage that will allow you to extend existing chain. However, it has two drawbacks that you can assess for your needs: (1) typically the link does not always move through the windlass gypsy reliably and (2) the link is usually significantly weaker than the break-rating of the chain.

Edited by stephenm27

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Practiced again last night in my messily 216, and threw out extra rope and back probably 10' and got a good bite on the bottom with anchor. Boat didn't drift at all..... Maybe some day I can move up to a larger boat that requires some chain..... :banana2:

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Okay, so my 15' of chain is seemingly too little. Is there an effective way to add chain to chain? I presume They make a linkage of some sort? Or do I have to scrap my brand new 15' and have a new 30' cut at West Marine?

As mentioned already there are mending links like this one ... http://www.westmarine.com/seafit--connecting-links--P005_154_002_004 ... that match or exceed the original chain specs if done correctly.

Other option for your old, short chain is to use it as a kellet ... see below.

FIG9.JPG

I am using my old chain in a similar way. Instead of a ball of chain lowered on the rode, I shackle it to the bitter end of chain section as I lower the rode and let it go to the bottom. There is one more step when needing to raise an anchor in a hurry or at night that you must not forget or you might damage windlass and/or boat.

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... that match or exceed the original chain specs if done correctly.

The WM 5/16" connecting link has a SWL of 1950lbs while G4 5/16" chain has a SWL of 3900lbs w/ a breaking strength of >11K lbs. The connecting link is a significantly weaker link (pardon the pun) and will likely break before the chain.

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I noticed that this post offers the classic advice of a scope ratio of 5:1 to 7:1 depending on conditions. I made the mistake of basing the 1 off the depth of the water I was in - and I was way off. The below except is from a Vice Commodore (I don't even know what that title means, other than he most assuredly knows more than me about Anchoring). Note the section with the enlarged font:

-------------------------------------

Simply put, it depends on how deep the water is and the expected conditions. Here are some simple

‘rules of thumb’:
Short‐term (lunch) in calm conditions 3:1 (length of rode to depth of water)
Overnight in normal conditions 5:1
Overnight or unattended in potential storm conditions 7:1
The ratio of the length of rode to the depth of water is called the scope, which should increase as we
prepare for worsening conditions. The larger the scope, the better the anchor will hold because the
angle of pull is just a few degrees off the bottom. However, with scope greater than 10:1 this angle
will not change very much. The depth of water is not just the charted depth, but also includes the
depth at high tide, and the vertical distance from the waterline to the anchor chock on the boat. If
you expect a storm surge or the anchor to dig‐in quite a bit, add those amounts too.
So if the chart depth at your anchorage is 3m (about 10’), expected high tide 2m (about 6’) and height to the anchor chock is 1.5m (about 4’), then the total depth for scope calculation is 6.5m or 20’, which yields an answer of 32.5m or 105’ for a normal overnight anchorage.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Net net, by looking at water depth alone in the above example you are off by 50%, which translates into needing double the length of anchor line you thought. Also on my Chap the depth sounder reads from the bottom of the boat which is 20" below the surface, so that's another 18" or 2' to factor into the height calculation that he does not mention.
I hope this helps others avoid my mistake :)

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The WM 5/16" connecting link has a SWL of 1950lbs while G4 5/16" chain has a SWL of 3900lbs w/ a breaking strength of >11K lbs. The connecting link is a significantly weaker link (pardon the pun) and will likely break before the chain.

That was just an example from WM ... there are other better options but in general you are right, the mending links are weaker. On the other hand, this might not matter much as the anchor rode is not lifting the boat up, it just prevents it from drifting with wind/current.

What is the breaking strength of the rope attached to the chain? Food for thought ... :)

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What is the breaking strength of the rope attached to the chain? Food for thought ... :)

The mid-grade 8 strand plaited anchor rode I have is rated at a tensile strength of 17k lbs...surprised me too.

That said, I'm pretty sure you could use a connecting link and probably be fine in all conditions that you'd actually want to be out/anchored in. Not sure how well they work with the windlass though...

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I hope this helps others avoid my mistake :)

Correct, and a good reminder ... sometime we use the "depth" as a shorthand.

The "depth" used to calculate the scope should combine the following:

- true water depth (measured by hand or taken from depthsouder set with correct offset),

- tidal impact (highwater adjustment),

- distance from water level to the anchor roller/choke.

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What's the rated strength for your cleats/gunwale? 17K seems like an awful lot!! Not to mention you'd really have to be anchored SOLID and might not be getting the anchor back at that point! lol.

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