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20 hrs on a 2006 boat


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Shell,

Matt is right. Where was the boat kept? How and where was it used. Why has it only 20 hrs and 7 years old? Is it the original engine? What model is it? Fresh or Salt water use? When was the last time the engine was turned over. Was the gas treated. Is it a carb or Fuel Injected?

Certainly the boat can be great, or the engine can be toast from lack of use and care. Good luck with your purchase.

IMO, get a mechanic to thoroughly check out the engine before committing to anything. Then i would want to sea test the boat.

Al

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With the recession, the owner may not have had the money to run the boat. Of course, that means they probably didn't have the money to maintain it either....

Get more information on the boat. Use and care records will tell you a lot about the boat. If it makes sense, get it checked out by a mechanic and push off from there.

Good luck.

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Could be OK, We have a 2008 204 and it only has 40 hours on it. We use it a couple of times each year, not as much as we would like, due to we bought a boat and live in the desert and the water levels have not been real great. So we use it when it is safe to do so and every year I have it winterized by the dealer and then have it checked out every spring. We clean it up after every use and wax it a couple times a year. Most of the time we take the boat out we do a little boarding and tubing then float around and jump in the lake. Guess you really do need some more information on this one.

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Would this be a boat to avoid. 2006 with 20hrs but looks in good shape, also not used for the last two years.

Don't go by the dash mounted hour meter. Have a mechanic plug in a hand held and check the engine hours on the ECM. I just went through this for a neighbor. 100 hours claimed, and 275 hours actual.

W

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Could be a great find.

I have a 94 with 100 Hrs.

The previous owner replaced the inboard with a remanufacture 357 BRAVO in 2010 and the lower unit 2011

It is recommended that you should get the overall boat checked out by a surveyor, and a mechanic for the compression test and oil analysis.

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We rarely use the 2002 186 anymore. first 3 years we did maybe 150 hours last 7 years I just maintain the boat because of the wifes love of it . Now has 170 CLOCK hours. Not true exercising hours. I take it out for a run with WOT for 30 seconds, every couple of weeks to prevent condensation rusting . This year is a run down of the fuel tank & refill at a none Ethanol marina again.

Use it or lose it. Really applies to the none- sealed engine & fuel systems in boats.

Have a small amount of the lower unit oil removed into a clear glass jar..............Any water milky choclate color ? if boat stores in a freezing area ? Good chance of hairline cracks in the aluminum gearcase.

True, it could be said...... it just needs a new seal........but it could be a damaged case.

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#1-"If it's to good to be true".....run

#2- with boats, use it or lose it as Cyclops 2 says

#3- I got burned by a 100 hr boat 8 years old. Ever notice that "100" hours seems popular, but 20 hours ?

Have it checked out ! .....don't buy on emotion like I did

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I don't buy all the use it or lose it stuff. it was winterized and put away, or maintained while only used a couple time a year i think it is great. Would you run from a 2005 Ferrari because it only had 3,000 miles? The yamaha boat i just sold, I bought last summer.2003 with 54 hours, verified. Ran perfectly all summer. Started right up for a test drive two weeks ago to be purchased. It looked and ran like new. Isn't that what we all want? A good or bad owner isn't determined by the hours on the boat or miles on the car. Just my opinion.

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For me, I'd be more worried about how/where it was stored when not in use. Properly winterized and kept in a warehouse and you've got little to worry about. Pulled from the water, sitting uncovered in the elements, stale gas and old oil, then that's another story.

We bought our 2008 from the original owner, he bought it new summer of 2008. He used the in/out service at the marina and when it was done for the season, they prepped it for winter storage in their warehouse. After the summer of 2010, it sat winterized & covered, but otherwise unused in the warehouse until I bought it with only 50 hours on it last summer. Visible inspection revealed a truly like new boat that I knew was properly winterized by the marina every year with paper records to prove it. Seller paid for a new battery, engine service, & pre-season once over plus sea trial, then delivery to my dock.

Good enough for me to pull the trigger and not think twice about it sitting in storage for 2+ years.

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"Just my opinion"

Don't mix cars with boats. Boats are subjected to different conditions and it's to bad many boat owners don't realize that. My neighbor drives a Big Mercury car and thinks that his "Walk around" Yamaha should work the same . Just turn the key and go. He doesn't use the boat often and never checks anything. It has low hours and he uses "Pump" gas to save money, after all it works in his big expensive car. He has let his water separater rust through until he couldn't start the engine. He has been towed in twice in the last two years. Once with a Locked up engine. He had gone out anyway ignoring an engine that wouldn't come up to speed and die.The boats on my canal that don't get used have electrical problems, overheating problems and fuel problems.It ain't like a car and even that should be started periodically . Starting a drained down, dry engine with a choke can wash the cylinder walls.

Commercial boats go out all the time....their break downs are from use.

With proper care a car can last and have low hours. I just read of a 68 Corvette with 3000 miles and only 3 people have sat in it. But it was managed care.

If a person doesn't use it often, has little interest to use it, how much interest does he have to care for it ? Did he fog it? oil deteriorates, did he change it over the years ? after all he didn't use it. Do seals dry up, take a set ?.....

Enough !

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I agree with Retlaw here. Thinking about old cars (I've had plenty of them)... If they sit a long time and develop a minor weep at the gearbox seals, for example, no big deal. Maybe they get a film of gear lube on the outside of the transmission or differential and leave a couple drips on driveway. That same amount of leakage at an outdrive seal will mean water in the outdrive. A crusty, corroded fuel tank is simple to remove from an old car. Usually it means cutting the deck out of a boat. An old car left to sit might just get flat tires (assuming water isn't leaking into the interior). An old boat, if it's not stored properly, probably means water intrusion and perhaps even structural damage from sitting supported wrong for many years.

I'm not saying that this particular boat is a problem, and it's not even very old; we really don't know much of anything about it. I'm just agreeing that the two different machines live in completely different worlds and storage/care/maintenance on a boat are way more important than they are on a car.

There are people all up and down the river where I kayak who have boats hanging in lifts that never should have been bought. I've watched a big twin engine walkaround up the river from me degrade over the years from a pretty, nice looking boat to something I wouldn't ever go out in. Lately, I see a large crack spreading through the transom area, and it just hangs there in its lift, year after year. On the other hand, I wouldn't hesitate to go out in my friends well maintained, well used 20 year old Robalo. He uses it all the time and also takes care of it very well.

Anyway, the best bet with that boat would be to get a thorough survey and mechanical check out. If it looks and runs well, still budget for some seal replacements and bug-chasing then see if the boat still makes sense. It might be a great boat, or it might be too much trouble.

Good luck.

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He's talking about a 2008 though not a 1983

I do agree, that's not an old boat by almost any measure. I was talking in more general terms, but still, a five year old boat not put away properly could still need a fair amount of attention. It really is 100% dependent on the way it was cared for. Overall, I do subscribe to the idea that boats used often will usually have fewer issues than the ones that just sit.

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Purchased our 2007 310 Sig with 19 hours on the engines last February. Still had bar code stickers on outdrives so the mechanic was able to scan them and check against ECM and original purchase. Traces were legit...we got a brand new boat!

Surveyor told us that we have stumbled on a gem....we were very fortunate. I have heard many contrary storeys about low hour purchases. The key is making sure you have a reputable dealer or broker.

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