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Breaking in Mercruiser 4.3 TKS


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I have heard mixed reviews about breaking in new motor. Some say drive it like you stole it to seat the pistons in properly and others say to do exactly what the manufacture recommends. I have 4 hours now and have not exceeded 3000 rpms. I vary my throttle and try and not to idle to much. Thoughts????

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This is exactly has I have done. although, I did check WOT at about 5 hours. It was not as fast as it is now. I think maybe becouse I didn't leave it there long, maybe 10 seconds. The manual says you can do WOT at ten hours for short burst. It is very hard to keep moving the throttle around and somewhat tiresom. So Glad I just reached 19.6 hours. My next launch, I am care free with the throttle and will enjoy just cruising and playing. Do it this way and you will sleep better than drive it like you stole it. If you stole it, you wouldn't give a dam about it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Modern auto / marine engines are fantastic pieces of machined metals.

Grandpa break ins are history. There should be no 1950s high & low spots or tapers.

Still, some companies say no low friction synthetic first oils. DUUUHH.......What was put in the engine by the factory ? I have never " Broke in " any engine for the last 20 years.

I drive them from day 1 like they had 20,000 miles already. Never a problem at 150, to 200,000 miles when I gave them away. No oil burners or loss of mileage.

I change oil FAITHFULLY every 7,000 miles............Wether it needs it or not. :)

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I was told to vary rpms first 5 hours with my 5.1 mercs, not sure why I received a error message at 19 hours on my starboard engine, it was O2 sensor. Took mechanic an hour to remove the error and Merc told him let me continue and I had no further warnings after 2 hour run home.

I was told by dealer get first oil change at 5 hours, I'm scheduled for oil change now, 21 hours after 35 days. :-) MarineMax tech who worked on my problem cautioned me to only use Merc synthetic 20-40 on these new emission controlled engines to remain in warranty. He also noted my lube fill was at "add" and I need to check that frequently.

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If we get any more friggin computer wrong messages. I WILL put a carburator & a magneto on the next new engine.

When they can afford to check boats at USCG M V stations, Then I will live with a computer.

They are taking the fun out of peeeing our money away as we like to.

Rich

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When we bought our 2007 Maxum 2400 SC ... we we're told by the dealer to vary throttle speeds and not to run WOT FOR THE 1st 20 hrs... We were so excited with our 1st boat ... We spent our 1st weekend out in the rain... Running her in in 2 days...but we didn't care... We were out on a boat !

Maniac.jpg

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Glad I got the Carb one now

Hi Ripley 629.... you mentioned above that you have the Carb one ... you mean the 190 HP ? ... we bought the same, and everyone I say that to, says I made a big mistake, that I should have bought the MPI 220 hp .... why did you buy this one instead of the 220 hp ? .... and you like it ok ?

Gary

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I love it. It has started up with no problems and its only 30 horse less which is about 2 to 3 MPH Difference. The TKS system normally doesn't require choking it either. Plus I don't have to worry about emission controls and all the error codes that the MPI HAS.

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I love it. It has started up with no problems and its only 30 horse less which is about 2 to 3 MPH Difference. The TKS system normally doesn't require choking it either. Plus I don't have to worry about emission controls and all the error codes that the MPI HAS.

...all good points ...i think we will be happy with the 190 hp.

Gary

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To me the biggest downside of the TKS is the resale value. The average Joe/Jane consumer these days has never heard of a carburetor, let alone owned a vehicle with one in it....the extra $$ up front for MPI will be recouped at resale for sure.

Break-in debate can/will be argued 1000 ways to Sunday. Absolutely no one can "win" that one.

Given today's engine materials, tighter manufacturing tolerances & practices (in general), consistent oil quality, etc etc etc, I haven't seen much negative evidence for break-in practice in any vehicle I have owned or been close to in the past 20 years. I'm no expert, and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night either. I've built dozens of 2-stroke engines, various 4-stroke recreation engines, and have a close personal and business relationship with several high volume engine builders. Couple good heat cycles, RPM variations to set the rings, initial oil change, and you're off to the proverbial races.

There will always be the odd bird in a manufacturing run. Some explode during the 2nd use, some last 10x of the average. Some run just fine but have lower than average HP numbers or higher than average fuel consumption. Mean, median, mode (for those that remember that far back in math): Forget the highs and lows, find the most common figure and that points to reality.

It's your boat, do with it whatever makes you feel comfortable. But I'd be #%^$&%$ed if I babied anything for 20 hours.....

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Resale value is a issue for maximum racing people.

99 out of 100 people who own a boat or car owner has no knowledge of what fuel system or valve induction system the engine has. They could care less.

Computerized error codes. None existant for a carburator.. Every carburator engine I have owned in 75 years on this planet has been trouble free IF...IF ...I never take it to a dealer for checkups or PMs.

The skill level varies all over the place with a handheld reprogramer by a not sure mechanic. A carb is a sealed unit to most people. Therefore it is left alone.

F I is better ? Pure sales hype that has been proven false by time. Better at going back to the dealer for more service expenses ?

The reason for F I has always been it is the CHEAPEST system compared to all the castings & machined parts of a carburator. All improvements are to reduce costs & increase profits.

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Personally, I prefer fuel injected to a carb, and I vastly prefer standard fuel injection to a catalyst equipped fuel injected engine. Not a big fan of our Conservative government up here in Canada, but I'm so glad they decided at the last minute we don't need cat equipped engines up here for the time being.

By and large, we see very few actual EFI or carb related problems; mainly $hitty fuel, or an engine is in need of a proper tune-up, etc. I am dismayed to see the large spread of margin between a standard EFI and a carb-equipped boat.

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Totally agree Shepherd

All my Honda Accords have been absolutly no problems with their F I . I give them away at 120,000 miles. Oil gas ,water air & filters does it. Sea Foam with erratic gasoline quality on the east coast stations.

Love all the things that need to be replaced with a " free service check " at dealers. A recheck reveals no replacement needed. Tough times for dealers everywhere.

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When I purchased mine Fuel Injection was the one must have. Both of my Atvs, snowmobiles and all cars have fuel injection and I don't miss the carb days on my "toys". The two things in my area you notice in used boats for sale are boats with the 3.0l the most and 4.3 tks second. Just my personal opinion.

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I can usually block off enough of any carburator intake throat area with my wallet or a credit card, to get a persons stalling out boat, back to a pier / dock for safety.

Nothing works with a fully computer controlled F I engine. Except a tow. If someone has a simple fix similar to the credit card & carburator, for a F I, I would love to hear about it.

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I ran a 4.3 MPI for 5 years with no issues. I compared head to head with a 4.3 carb once. I was quicker out of the hole and believe I had a bit of an efficiency edge. Top end was pretty comparable; I doubt we were trimmed out similarly. True gear heads will say that FI will not always deliver the 10-15% promised hp increase during the relatively constant loading conditions of boating as opposed to the start/stop and hilly terrains that auto engines experience. I figure the real hp difference is likely clocked in the higher RPM ranges where 90% of boating activities are NOT done.

At the end of the day, I wanted the most hp I could get out of the V-6 and I felt less at risk of engine backfires & compartment fires, but that's just me.

I do know that at resale time I benefited from the MPI. I had lots of inquiries that were specifically avoiding the 190s. On the other hand -- you have a brand new boat that is going to be a ton of fun and lots of great memories and you will never be able to put $$ on that. I say go out and have fun and enjoy yourself....this is not likely to be your last boat and there will be plenty of other things you'll decide you want on your next one that won't remotely be related to carb vs FI.

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