Colleenzg

I may have found my boat! But are the hours too high

27 posts in this topic

I have spent months looking for the perfect 290 signature. I found a boat that could be it but am concerned about the hours. It is a 2006 with 380 hours. Don't want to buy a maintenance nightmare! Any feed back would be great.

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Not sure why those hours scare you, less than 100 per year! Sounds to me like someone bought it and used it for what it is intended for. It all depends how it was maintained.

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You smoking crack? That's the boat you want to own. If you found a 2006 with 50 hours I'd say run far far far away it's a wreck.

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Let's do the math. 2006 model year boat with 380 hours. That boat is 7 years old. That's 54 hours a year.

Let's say they only used the engine on the weekend during the summer.

Let's say that it's a northern boat and summer is only May til September.

Boating season lasts 16 weeks.

13.5 hours a month.

3.5 hours a weekend during the summer.

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Mine's a 2012 and I just passed 220 hours last weekend! Well used engines = better reliability.

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Agree with others here. Ask to see service records if available. If not, inquire about service habits by current owner. We put 250 hrs on a 21' bow rider in 4.5 seasons but I winterized and de-winterized annually, serviced lower unit and changed oil annually, waxed and detailed annually, replaced impeller every other year, etc. That baby was humming when I sold her and two seasons later, the new owners are still having a blast. Fear irregular maintenance, not 40-60 hrs per season usage.

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I bought my boat when it was three years old and had 87 hours. At the time I thought I got a real bargain. The truth is; an under-used boat = an under-maintained boat. I have replaced many components which I believe would not have failed had the boat received regular exercise. Normal, average use is better for a boat than unusually low hours, IMHO.

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Agree with most the posters here. Depending on the location of the boat, your biggest risk may be that you have some worn out components due to salt water usage. The hours really aren't a big concern as long as the boat has been well cared for. Get it surveyed, and gone through by a mechanic to make sure it doesn't need any large repairs (manifolds, etc...). Use that report as a negotiating tool with the seller.

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I agree with the others.... the biggest issue will be doing the maintenance because you are a boat owner!

Not because you bought something that floats in the water and it goes forward & backwards... you use it in the summer and you put it away in the winter.

The serious boaters are serious about maintenance and making sure that the little things get done.

If that boat has those Hrs. and its maintained... you will be fine!

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Can someone put into perspective what *is* considered high hours, regardless of actual annual use?

Like: how many hours can we expect our major mechanicals to last before rebuild/replacement assuming no abuse and proper maintenance?

How about same for structural or other major systems?

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I agree with most.... Those hours are not high at all -- not by a long shot. My '05 (new in '06) Sig 310 has an almost identical number of hours. If yours was maintained anywhere near as well as I *think* I've maintained mine, you'll be fine.

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Can someone put into perspective what *is* considered high hours, regardless of actual annual use?

Like: how many hours can we expect our major mechanicals to last before rebuild/replacement assuming no abuse and proper maintenance?

How about same for structural or other major systems?

I have read that an average boater puts around 50 to 80 hours a year.

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As usual I am in the minority. When I was looking for my 2006 I really wanted to be under 200 hours. After I broke down and agreed to this boat with 380 hours we learned it had a brand new long block, manifolds and risers during the 2010-2011 off season. Jack pot. So check the records. But i agree the extra hours will show in the interior etc. Low hours doesnt mean lack of maintanance to me.

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As usual I am in the minority. When I was looking for my 2006 I really wanted to be under 200 hours. After I broke down and agreed to this boat with 380 hours we learned it had a brand new long block, manifolds and risers during the 2010-2011 off season. Jack pot. So check the records. But i agree the extra hours will show in the interior etc. Low hours doesnt mean lack of maintanance to me.

Low or high hours it will all depend on how it is taken care of. My boat is a pretty low hour boat because the lake is really just not that darn big. I do how ever take extra care of her with all maintenance done and lots of clean and waxing. There are some boats in the slips around me that are low hours and it is because of lack of use and it shows. If anything shows any sign of a problem it get fixed right away. I don't think the hours will be a problem so long as the boat checks out.

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Can someone put into perspective what *is* considered high hours, regardless of actual annual use?

Like: how many hours can we expect our major mechanicals to last before rebuild/replacement assuming no abuse and proper maintenance?

How about same for structural or other major systems?

Todd, to directly answer your question, I think it's reasonable to expect over 1000 hours or more out of a properly maintained propulsion system, and decades from a well maintained, quality hull. Most of my boating friends have boats much older than mine, with well into the thousands of hours, and they do great, because of good care and maintenance. Some are inboards, some are outboards, it doesn't seem to make much difference. One friend has a 12 year old Hells Bay flats boat with almost 1500 hours on the Mercury. He was recently offered more for it than he paid new, because it still looks new, even with that age and hours! He turned it down.

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Sorry, I will always disagree. The more vinyl is set on the more it wears. The more sun it see's the more it faded. In 380 hours most will have rubbed more piers than a bout at 100 hours. simple law of averages and undeniable wear. More spills, more accidents. Mechanical care and service is up to the owner regardless of how much use his schedule affords him. Of course their are always exceptions. I will tell you when I bought my 9 year old yamaha with 70 hours it was new in and out and ran like it. When I sold it a few months a go the perspective buyers that saw it were all shocked. But as i told them, it's 70 hours, it's a new boat. Just realized i am a perfect example. My yamaha got about 10 hours last year but I consider myself a regular user. In Maryland I bout June to Labor Day. Few exceptions but I don't miss RG III.So lets call it 13 weekend. One for rain makes it 12. Summer vacation or at least one weekend away brings it to 11. Most weekend it goes out both day but by no means all weekend. Lets call 18 time and add a outing in May and one in September. 20. We go 10 minutes max from our lift and drop the anchor. Every couple weeks we go an extra 5 minutes up the bay.That adds up to way under 10 hours. My expectation though is just that. 10 . So if i had bought new in 2006 I would now be at or under 70 hours. The logic here says run from that boat yet you are looking at a boat that would have been detailed every year, had car wash wax sprayed on it every sunday evening with a hose end sprayer, 303 kept on seats, professionally winterized every year and new impeller every year, slat away used every single time it came back to the lift. Half closed cooling system and a complete tune up at 50 hours. To me that is the boat everyone should be looking for. I know i was.

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On a properly maintained propulsion system never driven above 4000rpms, expect to get over 10,000+ hours between rebuilds.

That's only if the boat is driven year round and almost daily. If you use your boat 4 months a year and $%&# around at full throttle, every couple hundred hours at best.

Boats use car engines and behave the same. Drive daily = last forever. Drive only a few times a year = constant breakdowns.

To see a boat with a new engine after 200 hours means the owner had no idea what they were doing. I live in Florida and slip my boat 100yds from my back door. Im on it 4 days a week. I've never had to do anything but scheduled service.

My neighbor has over 3000 hours on his 2010 ski natuique. Nothing but oil changes.

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I can't tell you how grateful i am for all the information everyone has posted. I am getting more info on this boat, the current owner i am to understand had the boat detailed several times a season. So fingers crossed on the wear issue. The problem is going to be the service records. I am to understand they boat the boat two years ago and have maintened it well. However, prior to that it was bought by the mariane sales person at auction. It is fresh water now, and from what i can gather was fresh water prior in Colorado. As i live in Colorado i know our boating season is short but we only boat in Lake Powell which may be where this boat ran as well. The lake is huge and when we go out it is for three to four days. So last year we did 100 hours on our current boat.

Keep the great feed back coming.....i'll be a far more knowledgable boat owner in the end!

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A 1000 hours a year! I want to be him.

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If it was a auction boat the first owner ran out of money. Get a mechanic to go over it on top of the survey.

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To many generalizations to help anyone. But i am way past amazed at a 2003 in salt water with original manifolds and risers, just regular scheduled maintenance. My boat got the new motor at around 250 hours and four years due to a manifold breach. It was before i owned but i don't think it was due to stupidity . Could be wrong. To me hours aren't about the wear and tear on the engine internally., a 350 chevy will run forever at 3,500 or 5,000 rpm. Been there done that, repeatedly. In fact the Yamaha four stroke never goes below 8K and tops out at 10,200. It is about additional exposure to sun and salt.Hull, seats, paint and mostly corrosion. The motor is going to "wear" eventually out but corrosion kills. Not just internally but wires, switches, selenoids, speakers, guages, trim units, hinges and the list goes on. Given a choice give me the lowest hour fresh water boat you can find.

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I think we are all talking about the same thing here... a boat guy who considers the boat one of his prize possessions.

Not someone who treats his boat like his Corolla with old french fries on the seats from 2005 !

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