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Ric

trailer tires?

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My 215 ss has a dual axle aluminum trailer. It didn't tow all that well, the tires looked like they needed air (but had 50psi in them). They are 13 inch rims with "C" tires. My boat's "dry" weight is 3500lb. Anything above 60mph got hairy and didn't go faster.

I'm not a trailer expert but the rim/tire combo seems wrong. The trailer itself is beefy with a 2 5-16 ball size.

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I upgraded mine from load range c to d's when I replaced mine. They are 14" though, and the only manufacturer I could find with a load range d in a 14" was Kumho. It rides a lot better, not as much bouncing and swaying. They are pressurized to 65psi. 13" seems a bit small for a boat that heavy. Would you have to modify anything on the trailer to replace the wheels with 14 or 15" ones?

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I'm not sure. I live in FL where its all highway. I don't tow often I dock my boat but I was not comfortable with those tires.

It seems like 15in is the cheapest upgrade?

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I have 15s on my trailer. Has always towed like a dream. To upgrade from a 13, you may have clearance issues as well as a different bolt pattern?

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I'd say at least try to upsize the wheel to 14's and get the load rating D tires from Kumho. If you can go to 15's might as well if you are replacing the wheels, then your options are far greater for tires. The fenders may get in the way though, you'll have to measure from the center of the hub to the fender to see how large of a tire/wheel would fit.

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I`d upgrade to at least 14" tires and increase the load range to d`s.

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My 215 ss has a dual axle aluminum trailer. It didn't tow all that well, the tires looked like they needed air (but had 50psi in them). They are 13 inch rims with "C" tires. My boat's "dry" weight is 3500lb. Anything above 60mph got hairy and didn't go faster.

I'm not a trailer expert but the rim/tire combo seems wrong. The trailer itself is beefy with a 2 5-16 ball size.

How much tongue weight are you running on the hitch?

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I looked up what load a C range tire can handle and found that it is rated for 1820 lbs. Based on what I read (see below), It appears your existing tires can handle a load of 6400 lbs. This should be plenty for your setup.

You say it gets "hairy" above 60 mph. With this info, I think I would look at load balancing and not tire size. For a tandem axle, I believe the hitch should be carrying between 10 and 15% of the load. (dont trust me on that)

Kyle

If a tire has load range C, it can carry 1,820 pounds. If it’s on a single-axle trailer, this means both tires can carry a total of 3,640 pounds, which includes the weight of the trailer, the boat, the engine, fuel, and anything else inside the boat. Single-axle trailers can carry 100 percent of the load rating. Double-axle trailers require the load be reduced by 12 percent. As load range increases, psi increases.

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load range c is good for a 215,. different trailers have diff. requirements, go to the trailer mfg. website and it should tell you best tongue weight, tire size, weight capicity etc. then weigh the rig and see what you have. tongue weight and axle alignment are big factors in towing, sometimes ball height affects it also.

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Although 13's are not common (205/14's are), you should be fine. Is the trailer set-up level? As others have mentioned, get trailer and tougue weight. What are you towing with? Sounds like a set-up issue. My 220 tows straight and steady at any speed.

brick

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I guess the question goes, if 13in rims are okay where is a good place to get tires (cheap)? or a place to get 14 in rim/tire combo?

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Ah, found the problem. My tires are rated for 1000lb. Some idiot installed class C tires before me. The boat is well.... 3500lb dry (probably 4000lb with gear) plus the trailer it's over 4500lb. I'm at least 500lb over tire capacity and they show it. When some customers finally decide to cut me a check I'll order 5 of these:

http://www.etrailer.com/p-AM31985.html

It will bring my capacity from 4000lb to 6400. The trailer is rated for 5900 and the tongue weight is correct (it doesn't sway).

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Many years ago I switched to steelbelted auto tires. They are U V protected & far superior to trailer rated tires. Code requires a 5 or 10 % derating for some weird reason. Tires run straight & cool. Never have had any tire problems with the steel belteds. Even after even 10 years of use.

I reasoned passenger tires are made far better then any trailer tire.

Newer trailers can come with Steel Belted auto tires

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Goodyear marathons use to be good until they started manufacturing in China. A good percentage of trailer tires are manufactured off shore now. They do not like to be run low on air. If after you replace your tires and or adjust tongue weight and still have an issue with drivability, I would make sure that both axles are square to each other and to the frame rail. Use a straight edge across the center of the tires aired up the same. Then measure to the frame and make sure the straight edge touches all 4 tire surfaces as well. This will let you know if things are running true. When I rebuilt my trailer last year I used this method along with plumb bobs and and chalk lines on the shop floor when I installed the new axles.

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Ah, found the problem. My tires are rated for 1000lb. Some idiot installed class C tires before me. The boat is well.... 3500lb dry (probably 4000lb with gear) plus the trailer it's over 4500lb. I'm at least 500lb over tire capacity and they show it. When some customers finally decide to cut me a check I'll order 5 of these:

http://www.etrailer.com/p-AM31985.html

It will bring my capacity from 4000lb to 6400. The trailer is rated for 5900 and the tongue weight is correct (it doesn't sway).

That's cool that you found the 13" in D load rating. I could only find 1 brand that sells them in the 14". Strange that there are more options for them in the 13" size.

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Does anyone know if there are any disadvantages to upsizing the tire to a higher load rating (besides the higher cost!)?

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The real fix would be to ditch the horrible trailer tires and swap to light truck tires. The average $90 15in truck tire can handle at least 1900lb. Once you get in the 16s its 2400+.

Trailer tires are a dying breed. A lot of new trailers come factory with LT tires.

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Ah, found the problem. My tires are rated for 1000lb. Some idiot installed class C tires before me. The boat is well.... 3500lb dry (probably 4000lb with gear) plus the trailer it's over 4500lb. I'm at least 500lb over tire capacity and they show it. When some customers finally decide to cut me a check I'll order 5 of these:

http://www.etrailer.com/p-AM31985.html

It will bring my capacity from 4000lb to 6400. The trailer is rated for 5900 and the tongue weight is correct (it doesn't sway).

Those tires are complete junk, but since you "borrow" a tow vehicle both times per year you trailer the boat, I guess it would not matter if you put Fred Flinstone rock tires on the trailer.

If you ever did get a tow rig, and trailered more than the 15 miles to the river, get Carlisle Radial Trail RH tires. They are fantastic tires. Much improved from previous Carlisle tires.

Get them here:

Discount Tire

8107 S John Young Pkwy

Orlando

(407) 226-3276

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I ordered some mastercraft tires from one of the large trailer outfits on line. My prestige has 14 inch tires on it. I have put 700 miles on them with no issue. I had the good years, but I bought two replacements a year ago to fix a puncture I had picked up, and they were not of the same quality, they started to wear out faster than the old marathons that were on the trailer

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Does anyone know if there are any disadvantages to upsizing the tire to a higher load rating (besides the higher cost!)?

NO.....

No my old boat trailer had B's I put C's on it no problems. This one came with C's I put D's on it from Discount Tire. With discount tire I also to the guarantee replacement for them. Since I tow a lot it has paid for its self already. It never seems to fail "I Will" find the nail on the road. I even had to replace a tire at Big O and Discount Tire Paid for it. Now I have Guaranteed replacement at 2 tire stores. ;)

.

.

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Guy's, lots of misunderstandings here on what a trailer tire is and why it's different from a passenger tire or a light truck tire.... I know a lot of people that run "car" tires on their trailers so I won't get into who should do what and why. I will say this though, the load is carried by the amount of air contained in the tire, if you want to know how much weight "your" tires can carry, you need to consult a load inflation table. On this chart you will reference your tires construction and size, then reference the capacity at various inflation pressures. The weight capacity of a passenger car tire (p-metric) stops increasing at 35 psi, a C load range trailer tires weight capacity charts up to 50 psi. A nice use of the load inflation table is: when changing tire sizes (going from a 185/80D13 to a ST205/75R14 for example) you can verify the new tire will at least carry as much weight as the old tire. There are many accurate statements here regarding tongue weight and its effect on what the trailer pulls like but that is still exclusive to having the weight of the boat/trailer/contents supported properly on the trailers tires.

It is true, most trailer tire manufacturing has gone off-shore and most brand choices are limited to 3rd and 4th tier manufacturers. Do your research and choose wisely.

JR

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I run carlisle all terrain tires on both my boats, they are bias tires, make sure if you buy them there made in america or canada, otherwise there junk. I also gave up on air and use nitrogen instead.

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