Futzin'

Boat trailering, yes or no

Boat Trailering, Yea or Nay?   142 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you typically trailer your boat to get to water?

    • Yes, we like to travel to different destinations.
      88
    • No, we're attached to one place primarily
      39
    • We've tried both and prefer . . .
      15

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41 posts in this topic

Wondering how many of us trailer versus storing at or near the water. I figure most cruiser owners don't trailer regularly.

To date we have kept the boat at our house, trailering to different lakes. We've enjoyed the flexibility of being able to go where we want, and being able to clean it whenever we want. Being able to keep an eye on it is good, too.

Gonna try slipping at a marina this year, see how it goes. We found a slip and lift at our favorite lake. Our goal in recent years has been to maximize time on the water; to enjoy the morning and evenings on the water, rather than spending that time loading up and driving. Toward that end we've been staying at a motel about 30 minutes away, and tying up at a marina (no developments allowed on this lake). Goal this year is to camp as much as possible (converted cargo trailer) at the lake and enjoy having the boat ready to go.

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We do both, trailer the jet boat in NY and keep the cruiser in one place in FL. It really depends on the area. There are so many different experiences to have in upstate NY by trailering, so we feel that is the way to go there. In FL, we found that we just kept launching the jet boat near our house and rarely traveled far with it, so it lead us to getting a cruiser here to keep at a marina waiting for us (and freeing up our garage).

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Wondering how many of us trailer versus storing at or near the water. I figure most cruiser owners don't trailer regularly.

To date we have kept the boat at our house, trailering to different lakes. We've enjoyed the flexibility of being able to go where we want, and being able to clean it whenever we want. Being able to keep an eye on it is good, too.

Gonna try slipping at a marina this year, see how it goes. We found a slip and lift at our favorite lake. Our goal in recent years has been to maximize time on the water; to enjoy the morning and evenings on the water, rather than spending that time loading up and driving. Toward that end we've been staying at a motel about 30 minutes away, and tying up at a marina (no developments allowed on this lake). Goal this year is to camp as much as possible (converted cargo trailer) at the lake and enjoy having the boat ready to go.

What is your favorite lake?

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I have never seasonally docked. For me it is more cost and time effective to trailer. And from a safety stand point the last thing you want to be is caught in a storm on Lake Erie in a 23ft boat, been there, done that, not fun. And every time we get high winds, you have to go and check to see if she is still tied to the dock or still floating. Not to mention having to clean up what ever has happened since the last time you had her out. What works for me, may not be worth it to you and vice-versa. It's kinda like, what ever floats your boat. My girl is pampered, she sets in a warm dry building year around, she is spoiled. Denny.

IMG_2156_zps146ac9a8.jpg

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I walk 3 minutes to my dock, flip on the battery, pump the gas one and fire it up. While it warms up I open the cabin, connect to bluetooth and pandora, wipe off any bird poop, untie and go.

Wouldn't have it any other way.

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i trailer. always have. I live aobut 5 miles from the ramp though so its not a whole lot of wasted travel time.

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We've always kept our previous boat in a boat shed or the garage. It was always better protected, but was also a pita hitching up, towing and launching. Enjoy the ride then repeat in reverse. Became a hassle after awhile, not to mention the occasional items that found themselves in the way of hitching up or just being temporarily stored in the boat.

With the new boat, we have a trailer that stays in the back yard, but we keep the boat in a Hydro Hoist at a wet slip at the marina. Easy drive to the marina, lower the boat, fire up the engine, check out the details and go.

During every summer, we do tow the boat to DeGray Lake in Arkansas for a week or better staying in a cabin and spending the days playing on the water.

Guess I can say that I have the best of both worlds!

http://www.degray.com

http://www.iron-mountain.com

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We've always kept our previous boat in a boat shed or the garage. It was always better protected, but was also a pita hitching up, towing and launching. Enjoy the ride then repeat in reverse. Became a hassle after awhile, not to mention the occasional items that found themselves in the way of hitching up or just being temporarily stored in the boat.

With the new boat, we have a trailer that stays in the back yard, but we keep the boat in a Hydro Hoist at a wet slip at the marina. Easy drive to the marina, lower the boat, fire up the engine, check out the details and go.

During every summer, we do tow the boat to DeGray Lake in Arkansas for a week or better staying in a cabin and spending the days playing on the water.

Guess I can say that I have the best of both worlds!

http://www.degray.com

http://www.iron-mountain.com

grew up on degray. My grandparents had a farm over on the shouse ford side, in Point Cedar. We would be around there every summer! Love that lake. Its my dream to one day own a lake house up there.

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Ric & I are remove covers. Start engines. By the time the covers are stored. WAAAHOOOO !!

Dock & indoor storage. St Lawrence River & Lake Ontario. Couple of MAY DAYs .

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We've always kept our previous boat in a boat shed or the garage. It was always better protected, but was also a pita hitching up, towing and launching. Enjoy the ride then repeat in reverse. Became a hassle after awhile, not to mention the occasional items that found themselves in the way of hitching up or just being temporarily stored in the boat.

With the new boat, we have a trailer that stays in the back yard, but we keep the boat in a Hydro Hoist at a wet slip at the marina. Easy drive to the marina, lower the boat, fire up the engine, check out the details and go.

During every summer, we do tow the boat to DeGray Lake in Arkansas for a week or better staying in a cabin and spending the days playing on the water.

Guess I can say that I have the best of both worlds!

http://www.degray.com

http://www.iron-mountain.com

I like Lake Degray - easy to get into to, pretty layout, and it's proximity to Little Rock. We had found that the lake was a bit small - I enjoy long adventurous rides and Degray can be covered in just about 30-45min.

We use to have a permanent location on Greers Ferry because we didn't have vehicle that could tow until now. We keep ours on a trailer in dry storage near Bull Shoals/ Norfork Lakes in North Central Arkansas. I like having the option to go to different places and like trailering because:

1. Different places

2. Cheaper Gas

3. I can unload and load by my lonesome without a problem. It's tricky, but I have a method. And most of the time - there is always someone willing to help. The admiral is not always available.

4. I can do a more thorough exterior wash-down

5. Dry covered and secure storage - @ 40 deer a month for a 12X36 with electric - anytime!

6. No bird poop, bug issues, and dampness

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I have a trailer for my 24'. Used to use it for the first couple years. Discovered marina living and never looked back. The boat is on the trailer once a year when I have it out for service. I love the fact I'm on shore power, I uncover, disconnect, fire up the blowers, refrig already has the, umm, pop chilled and I'm ready to go. I boat so much more frequently due to the ease of getting out there. My new boat - no trailer and we'll dry-dock for services. I don't care if I ever trailer again...

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A friend of mine once told me that he chose to played tennis because he did not have enough time in his daily schedule to play golf. I believe that boating in a sense is like that. It is all about getting as much quality time on the water that you can get in the time that you have to do it in.There is no best way to boat. Larger boats are like floating cottages and are limited to needing a permanent place to moor, always having to leave from point A.The nice thing about a larger boat is they have all the comforts of home and you don't have to leave the dock to enjoy your time on the water. And on rough water, size does matter. Smaller boats are like toys and are designed to be played with.Your options are endless, as to where you can go and how you can get there. Docking - rack storage - or trailering, it doesn't matter, what matters is being there. Heck I have two good friends that are blow-boaters. Denny.

DSC03745_zps3c835b28.jpg

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About to enter our second season trailering. We're about 15 - 20 minutes from the usual launch so trailer time isn't much of a factor. We did enjoy trailering to Norris Lake in East Tennessee and Smith Lake near Cullman, AL but all in all we prefer dry racking at the same marina and just calling ahead to have the boat splashed by the time we get there. The irony is road time to the marina is 40 min so we actually have more time on the water trailering. Go figure.

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The average lakes we visit are approximately 2 to 4 hours away. Therefore our boating is limited to bi-weeklendy (don't know if that is a word).

All of Colorado's water goes to other states, so we are in Wyoming, Nebraska, Arizona, Utah more often than not. Its worth the travel to us!

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Boat on Charleston Lake in Ontario, which is really a minature version of the 1000 Islands on the St. Lawrence River. Would prefer to boat on the River, but I can't afford it. Beautiful, large, and deep lake that's hard to get bored on. Also has a large section that is off limits to development.

Boat stays in the water from late June to Labour Day. Love to be able to untie and go, and then simply come back late and tie up to the dock - wish I had a lift, but at least the bay we're in is well protected from wind and waves.

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A friend of mine once told me that he chose to played tennis because he did not have enough time in his daily schedule to play golf. I believe that boating in a sense is like that. It is all about getting as much quality time on the water that you can get in the time that you have to do it in.There is no best way to boat. Larger boats are like floating cottages and are limited to needing a permanent place to moor, always having to leave from point A.The nice thing about a larger boat is they have all the comforts of home and you don't have to leave the dock to enjoy your time on the water. And on rough water, size does matter. Smaller boats are like toys and are designed to be played with.Your options are endless, as to where you can go and how you can get there. Docking - rack storage - or trailering, it doesn't matter, what matters is being there. Heck I have two good friends that are blow-boaters. Denny.

Lol so so true. We keep the chap (dry stored on trailer) about a fifteen minute drive from the big boat/ floating condo. It also happens to be a few minute dinghy ride from our favorite anchorage. The big boat is home base and the chap is our wheels on the water. There's so much we can get to from where we keep the boat that we don't forsee towing it anywhere. If we change our minds we will have to buy a tow vehicle. :)

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Not easy to tow a big 37 foot boat. Linked to the water and can travel up and down both the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay/River.

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We trailer 100% of the time unless staying over night somewhere. I have checked into renting a slip, but haven't found anything reasonable enough for my budget as of yet. I would love to have a slip in a nice marina some day. Seems there's another whole side/community to the boating world inside of a marina which looks like great fun in itself.

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New to the site. 1992 2000 SLC Sport. Trailer all the time, 1/4mi from storage to the ramp. lower Pax River salt water so no need for bottom paint and added maint of leaving in water. A tad more time to wash hull and flush motor but she looks almost new for being 22 yrs old.

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Had a trailer with my old boat and saved a lot of money, but the new Chap is too big for my truck to pull. It's nice to get to our slip now, fire up those Merc's and go! It's a second residence on the water from May till Oct! I prefer a slip now but my wallet doesn't.

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When I don't have to work for a living and can live close enough to Lake Powell, I'll get a slip. Until then I'll trailer.

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