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coopaloop

Finally found her...

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There are a ton of hours left in that boat. Who here has had to replace an engine because it wore out? If so, what were the hours? Almost every new boat engine replacement seems due to winter freeze not hours. Heck even airplanes are given 1000 - 1200 hours between TBO and that's because of safety standards, and they take more abuse than boat engines and have harsher envoirnments and temperature swings.

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Most airplane piston engines I am familiar with (Lycoming and Continental) will make 2,000 hours before an overhaul is required. However, typically a top overhaul is required at 1,000 hours (cylinders). Keep in mind these are air-cooled engines (well, and fuel also) and the cylinders take much more abuse than a water cooled engine.

Excellent point -- not many people having to rebuild a worn-out engine.

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You say it's a clean boat. It is local and has maintenance history. I'd make a low offer and just put aside some money for repairs down the road. If you do the 30-50 hrs a year most seem to do and maintain the boat properly you should be good.

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I would either make a low ball offer as described above and mentally be prepared to deal with issues as they arrive or, as I personally would do, walk away and look for another boat. I would never, ever buy a rental boat. Period. Just personal preference. You don't know what people have done to it. I would pivot and find another boat. They are out there. I personally do not want to deal with issues on a boat like that and I would always have the thought of "ticking time bomb" in the back of my mind. That is my humble opinion. But as the posts above say, for the right price.....

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Coopaloop - good job not letting emotions get in the way of carefully checking out this boat. Methinks the owner knows more than he is telling you. Ask for him to obtain the service history. And the selling price of the boat just went way down. The engine hours may not be a deal breaker, but have an engine oil analysis done. They are cheap to do, and that will tell you how worn the engine is.

Good luck, and hopefully you will have a new Chappy soon, either this one or another.

brick

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Has anyone used NADA's www.Boathistoryreport.com? Cost is $35.00. You put in the HIN and get a report. Not sure what it would show regarding rental history.

brick

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I'v never used either. I think I would lean to saving the money and getting a good survey. I agree that a rental boat would tend to be abused. But.... if the hull is clean, interior meets your expectations, you get a good survey and the price is right....- Well, I would!

Good luck!

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Another issue to consider is if you will have a hard time selling the boat in the future.

brick

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Resell is probably my primary concern at this point. First boat purchase, if we are not a lake family I sell it in a few years.

I assume the right price can solve the resell aspect though.

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Coopaloop,

Clearly this is your first boat - You NEVER sell them, you "upgrade them".

Funny thing with boats, they just keep getting bigger as they age!

From what I am told, that trend starts to reverse at around 70, if you ave the good fortune to live into your 90's, they often become small aluminum boats with a 5hp OB hanging off the back end.

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Resell is probably my primary concern at this point. First boat purchase, if we are not a lake family I sell it in a few years.

I assume the right price can solve the resell aspect though.

Agreed, the value has dropped, as should your offer. If I understand correctly then the current owner is 2nd owner. He's had it for several years and used it lightly. I think any major issues from prior abuse would have shown up by now through out his ownership. Sounds like it was only in rental fleet for 1 long season.

If it drives nice, runs good, and is cosmetically acceptable, then make a new offer, subject to inspections. If accepted, then spend the money for oil analysis and a proper survey. But my guess is the current owner isn't going to like your new offer. If so walk away. He may call you back in a couple of weeks hoping your offer still stands!

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Resell value is indeed important. The boat I walked away from was actually very sound even though it had been dropped from a forklift. The boat had a hundred qualities that out-shined the damage history and the surveyor assured me that the boat wouldn't "fall apart". But the real issue was that there was very little chance of me finding somebody else who would buy the boat given the history (and what I may be hiding by trying to sell).

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Some good objective points made here. I second Brick's thought of kudos to OP's ability to keep emotion out of it. That's very tough to do, especially after waiting for the one you want. Good points made both ways.

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coopaloop already said his concern was resale. So what kinda deal would all the naysayers need to buy the boat. To my opinion if I could get the boat 20% below market value, I would still do it (ie 80% of low retail on NADA). Obviously resale is a concern, but if you pay less up front, you can sell it for less on the back side. Would you do it for 80% of NADA low retail? Give Coopaloop some opinions on when the deal is good enough to take the risk of a rental boat with high hours.

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, but if you pay less up front, you can sell it for less on the back side.

Maybe. That's the risk. In such a strong buyer's market (and assuming it stays that way for at least the next few years), your market is severely reduced. So many other boats on the market with more fresh engines. It's not so much about how much you can sell it for but rather can you sell it at all? I wouldn't dare suggest to the OP what price the boat needs to be to make it worth his while...that's a personal financial decision that only he can make. I wish him luck!

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I wouldn't buy it. If it turned out to be a bad deal for whatever reason, the buyer's remorse would be overbearing.

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Wow...did a check on NADA Guides and that boat and trailer with no options came up with 40 herds of deer. I don't know what kind of number's that you and the seller are talking about. But if you are interested in the boat and like it make them a low offer. I'd start a 20 herds and go no more then 25. Telling the seller that it has 454 hours on it.

Personally I would not hesitate buying a rental boat that had that many hours on it. As long as you have it surveyed and a engine oil analysis done on it. If it come up clean, then you know that the boat should be free of problems. Just like buying one of those rental cars from Hertz or Budget. It's got a heck of a lot of mile on it for a 6 month old vehicle. But you know all the bugs have been worked out of it.

The 454 engine is a strong engine and it should last longer then the interior of the boat over the years. It's those 4 cylinder engines that break down faster in my opinion.

Make him a low offer if you want the boat. If he doesn't take it, then walk away and look elsewhere.

Keep us posted....

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Definitely two schools of thought here. The camp of "Run Forrest" and the camp of if it all checks out and the price is right then do it.

When I priced on NADA with options I was at almost 44 herds of deer for the Low Retail. Granted that would be under normal hours.

You guys/gals have been tremendous help. It has been difficult to keep the emotion out of it. We missed out on one 3 weeks ago. The seller and I were communicating and someone came in and paid his full asking price. My wife (CEO of the house) was a tad bummed.

This one seems to be perfect as it was on the lake where we are gonna boat, already lifted, already in a paid slip. The only downside is the 454 hours.....

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So is it confirmed it was a rental boat? Have you discussed with the seller?

brick

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Sorry....I thought this boat had a 454 engine in it with 450 hours. But the hours is 454 correct? If you get the survey done and it check out ok. And the sea trial is a thumbs up. Make them a low ball offer due to the hours. And if they don't take it, give them your number and tell them to call you back if they reconsider. Might be a month, but if they don't get any offer's, they'll be calling you for the price you offered.

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