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I want to hoist my boat off the trailer

33 posts in this topic

With the boat in the water, the slime needed to be scrubbed off. There is bottom treatment on it but it only goes so far. As I was scrubbing away, I noticed that there is some stains in the gelcoat that wouldn't come off no matter how hard I scrubbed. It is the area where the boat sits on the bunks when trailered.

Due to the design of the bunks on my trailer, a traditional crane with straps won't work. What I want to know is, are the cleats and fiberglass strong enough to pick the boat up with?

I want to pick the boat up, pull the trailer out from underneath it, then set it down on wood blocks[while still strapped to the crane to hold it], scrub and treat the bottom, then lift it back up and put it back on the trailer. Can the boat tollerate the weight? +/- 5K

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You might want to try putting the trailer in the water and floating the boat back a foot or two on the trailer to accommodate the stern strap and have enough room for the bow strap. Lifting by the cletes is way imho.

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Just my opinion but I would not use your cleats to try and lift the boat. They are not made to handle that type of weight. Using the bow and stern eyes might be a plausible option if you can use straps accordingly.

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Cleats NO. Bow and stern eye best options. If on trailer you can use a of 2x6 and a floor jack to raise the back off the bunks. Block it with other pieces of wood and clean away. Just think safety the whole time jacking and blocking

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I do have bow and stern eyes. But I'm reluctant to lift it that way because I'm pertty sure the bow was in an "incident" before my brother even had it. When in the cuddy, I opened the mirrow at the front to check for wiring and I noticed what looks like a repair.

A couple of years ago, I did try and raise the boat with a block of wood. The floor jack wasn't tall enough and all I did was raise the trailer as the jack took the weight.

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Most pics of boats being hoisted that I have seen show straps cradling the boat from the bottom. Not sure about your model..but I believe my Sunesta was put together top half and bottom half..Thats why there is a stainless strap with a million screws in it circling the outside. I don't think lifting from the top would be safe....kinda like opening a can of sardines. jmho...once again.

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Last year I had to have some keel damage repaired. The local figerglass expert backed the trailer into his shop, used jacks to lift the stern off the bunks just an inch or two and slide nylon straps underneath at the lifting point. Repeated for the bow, and lifted the boat off the trailer high enough to do the repairs. His rig is basically like the old fashioned strap-based boat lifts.

Don't know if you have access to anything like that but seems like that is a good way to handle your situation with suspected bow repair and all....

Tough situation - Good luck!

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try this

lower trailer jack all the way down (trailer not connected to tow vehicle of course). block the back of the boat up snug.

lift the trailer jack all the way up. the stern will stay on the blocks and the bow will rise. block the front.

lower the trailer jack back to the middle, and you should have a few inches of space between the bunks and the boat.

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I wouldn't attempt to lift my boat from any of the hardware attached to it and I definitely wouldn't get under it after doing so. A sling wrapped under the hull would be my preferred lifting method, but I would want it firmly sitting on some stands on solid ground before getting under it. Just my opinion.

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try this

lower trailer jack all the way down (trailer not connected to tow vehicle of course). block the back of the boat up snug.

lift the trailer jack all the way up. the stern will stay on the blocks and the bow will rise. block the front.

lower the trailer jack back to the middle, and you should have a few inches of space between the bunks and the boat.

That's a good idea. If any additional clearance is needed, he could always let the air out of the trailer tires (at the appropriate time, of course)...

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I wouldn't attempt to lift my boat from any of the hardware attached to it and I definitely wouldn't get under it after doing so. A sling wrapped under the hull would be my preferred lifting method, but I would want it firmly sitting on some stands on solid ground before getting under it. Just my opinion.

+1

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The lifting rings are for lifting the boat. That's how boat dealers load onto trailers.

Whatever you do, safety first.

brick

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Okay I'll bite...what are lifting rings?? Oh and Beason...pretty good idea in a pinch.......would need a stack of dunnage laying around...

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jacks_types_safety_stands.gif

support the back of the boat w/ 2 jack stands (place 12"x12" wood between the stand and boat at each spot) and then a few more towards the bow.

I can think of a few ways to safely get space under your bunks

1. after you place the jack stands around and fully support the boat, let the air out of tire of the trailer and slowly pull it away to expose the underside

2. prior to placing the jacks, raise the tongue of your trailer as high as you can crank it up. support the boat as above and then lower the tongue and then deflate the tires this will give you a small amount of space to clean then refill and raise.

Muratic acid solution mixed w/ water will remove the stains. - rinse completely and avoid getting it on your trailer.

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When I took my trailer in for new bunks I jacked the back of the boat up using a jack and blocked it. You can then jack the front of the boat up and block it and move the trailer forward, move the blocks past the support on the trailer and so on. It is slow but doable. I just lifted mine off the front eye with a material handler , rolled the trailer out and then blocked it using stacked pallets. The back of the boat was blocked on each side using large jack stands with wood on top and the bottom. It was VERY stable.

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try this

lower trailer jack all the way down (trailer not connected to tow vehicle of course). block the back of the boat up snug.

lift the trailer jack all the way up. the stern will stay on the blocks and the bow will rise. block the front.

lower the trailer jack back to the middle, and you should have a few inches of space between the bunks and the boat.

Great idea!

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try this

lower trailer jack all the way down (trailer not connected to tow vehicle of course). block the back of the boat up snug.

lift the trailer jack all the way up. the stern will stay on the blocks and the bow will rise. block the front.

lower the trailer jack back to the middle, and you should have a few inches of space between the bunks and the boat.

...on a flat surface with the wheels blocked

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A marina with a high and dry facility will have fork lifts that can take your boat out of the water and place it on a maintenance rack. Not sure they would do that for someone that is not storing there, though... They usually charge by the hour on the racks.

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The lifting rings are the two big rings on the transom, and the bow eye.

brick

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Guys,

Thanks for the suggestions. I thought removing it by crane would be the easiest way to do it. But I like Beasons method better. I don't have to risk dropping it as the trailer will still be underneath it to catch it. Hope I'm not underneath that! hahaha

I do have several jack stands here. I'll have to check the shed for wood.

Today, I took the boat for a spin and the slime is growing rapidly. I just scrubbed it about 2 weeks ago so it is obvious the bottom treatment I used is no longer working. If the weather is good this week, I'll take it to my usual area and get the easier- to-scrub slime off before pulling the boat out. Then do the whole thing afterwards. Got a gallon of acid standing by.

Keep you updated...Thanks

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Type in "How to properly take your boat off its trailer - YouTube" for an internet search. You'll be surprised how easy it is.

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If you're referring to the first video on the list, I won't be doing it that way. I don't have jack stands that tall or enough wooden blocks to stack it to clear the trailer. I'm only going to raise it a few inches above the trailer and to stablize it, I'll put some wedges in between the bunks and the boat. Plus, I'm the only one there, working on my own. For me, this is the safest way to do it.

The weather looks good tomorrow [Monday] and I'll take the boat out for the day and then pull it out tomorrow night. Scrub the next day.

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