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BigRiver

Beware of the China Bombs

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Just checked this weekend & my GY Marathons are Chinese as well. Little bit of a bummer, but they seem to be performing well on the road virtually every weekend and with at least one 700+ mile road trip.

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I remember Japanese junk when we rebuilt the industrial base after WW II..............Now they were / are the only supplier of our most secret super computers in our jet fighters.

The Chinese WILL develop into world beaters. Just like the Japanese have. The Asians & Koreans are world class in many fields of LARGE equipment.

We chisel down the price & demand cheap junk for high profit margins.........The Chinese give us what we want............Greed always has a problem.

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I will be very careful when I buy my new tires. If I can only get Goodyear Marthon from China, I will look elsewhere.

brick

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As I've said guys, I've researched many other forums and something negative has been said about almost every brand of trailer tire…except Maxxis. They're made in Thailand, not under Chinese standards.

If something negative about them is out there, I've never seen it. I've got the MT8008's which is 225/75R15….10 ply E rated. Bought them from discountdirecttire.com…(can i say that?)

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I just replaced all of mine, they were dated from 04. Yeah, I was running on borrowed time. Bought 4 new Hercules tires. Yep, they're from China, too. At least they sound like they're strong. :banana2:

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Now you know why I use Michelin steel belted car tires on my trailers. They last just as long as on a car. 2 of the 3 trailers have been converted to use the same size tires as the Accord. Full sized spares are a comfort on interstates at 60 mph

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Maybe it’s been mentioned and I just missed it but does anyone have verbiage in their insurance about trailering with non-trailer rated tires? I wasn’t sure if you had a blowout causing damage or even worse while running car or LT tires if they would leave you high and dry…?

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I have a Voltage 3950 and one of the most common modifications that people make on their trailers is they replace the stock Akulet tires with J rated Continentals. Akulet are crappy Chinese tires. Some folks have had them burst literally on their delivery trip home. If they do burst the typical repair bill is about $4k for repairs.

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A common misconception is that passenger tires will “work just fine” on a trailer. Unfortunately, the practice of using car tires on trailer is common, and often presents a significant safety concern. Just about everything in a trailer tire, from construction to compounding, is different than a typical passenger tire. A few of the key differences are:

1. Compounding

Most trailer tires feature a tread compound that is blended with extra ozone and UV resistant polymers to help the tires last longer when sitting out service. Their compound is also optimized for heat resistance, critical when carrying the heavy loads often associated with trailers.

2. Sidewall

Trailer tires are built with much stiffer sidewalls than a typical car or light truck tire. This helps control sway and provides additional blow out resistance when contacting curbs and other road hazards.

3. Tread Design

Trailer tires are built to be used in free rolling positions. Since they are not required to “steer”, their tread can be optimized to provide less rolling resistance in a trailer application.

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Show me in COMPANY letterhead where a LT tire or trailer tire has EVER outlasted a passenger car tire. People change trailer tires EVERY 3 to 5 years. WITH or WITHOUT mileage. When you buy trailer tires They warn you to change them. Ever see a trailer tire last for 40,0000 to 60,000 miles? Yet they cost a lot more.

There have been 0 zero specifications on trailer tire construction. They are LOW SPEED rated tires for short periods.

Check federal testing standards NOW & the proposed Version #1....# 2 ...& #3 trailer standards. Which the trailer tire companies are fighting against.

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Still waiting on word from Magic Tilt as to if they'll honor any warranty on the failed tire.

Either way, they're all getting replaced, just want to see what Magic Tilt will do.

I'll post up as when I know.

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Your trailer is a follower, which often makes tire sidewall flexing a negative. Sidewall flexing on trailers, especially those with a high center of gravity (boat/travel trailers) or that carry heavy loads, is a primary cause of trailer sway. Typical passenger radial tires with flexible sidewalls can accentuate trailer sway problems. The stiffer sidewalls and higher operating pressures common with Special Trailer (ST) designated tires help reduce trailer sway.

Also consider that Special Trailer (ST), as well as Light Truck (LT) tires are fully rated for trailer applications. This means ST- and LT-sized tires can carry the full weight rating branded on the sidewalls when used on a trailer.

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Best way to get trailer sway ? Have almost no trailer tongue / hitch weight when the trailer is loaded. a 6,000 # boat & trailer means between 400 & 600 pounds of weight on the hitch / tongue. I have found people driving with 60 to 100 # of weight.

Why ?

It is too hard to crank up. SERIOUS dangers with that condition.

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I might point out that the stiffness of the trailer tire's sidewall is most important when making slow tight turns. The aft tire depending on movement direction, tends to have lateral drag and twist.

If the bands in the side wall are not designed or constructed properly, failures occur, as such in the photos of my "China Bomb".

BigFun, I agree that the rubber compound composition is also important. Cheap auto tires wear out sooner than say, quality Michelins.

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This seems to be one of those topics where the average joe seems to know more than the experts from the industry. I am sure there is anecdotal evidence where this one or that one has successfully run this type of tire or that with no problem, but the fact that somebody managed to go outside of recommendations without negative consequences doesn't mean the engineering is void.

For example, I am not a lubricant expert. I have managed to make do every now and then with standard straight 30 weight in a 4 cylinder when every recommendation is to use oil designed for high RPMs and high engine temps. I could have called BS on the manufacturer's recommendation and the oil company's specs and just declared them all crooks and/or idiots. By and large, I used the correct oil for the 4 cylinder based on manufacturer's recommendation and I got 200K miles out of that vehicle before I sold it to my neighbor who is still driving it. I don't run car oil in my boat (uh oh, here comes another thread on marine vs land vehicle lubes... sorry folks), I don't run boat oil in my car, and I don't used the same oil in my turbo-charged V-6 as I did in my old 5.3L V8. I don't run truck tires on my car or car tires on my truck, although I am pretty sure I could probably get away with one or the other. And if I had a different type of towing need than the one I had, I would have bought a different truck and engine that is designed more for the duty. Not everything in this world is generically and indiscriminately manufactured with only clever marketing campaigns designed to fool consumers.

So when it comes to trailer tires, I don't have anything on company letterhead but I believe the manufacturers when they say that sidewall construction, UV resistance, and compounding for heat dissipation are prime design criteria for ST tires just like I believe that a thousand dollar set of tires specially designed for left-side/right-side of a Corvette are more appropriate than the four hundred buck Goodyear Eagles at WalMart, even though you might be able to run around town in the WalMart tires - and I don't need any specs on company letterhead to know that is the case, either. And I know better than to expect the thousand dollar tires to last for 30,000 miles because they're DESIGNED for traction and speed performance, not passenger duty. So why would I not believe ST tires are designed and manufactured in a specific manner for a specific duty.

UV damage kills more trailer tires than mileage, and tires that rarely get used and heated-up/cooled down due to normal use get hard and brittle, whether they are on cars, trucks, RVs, or trailers. I don't think anybody disputes that. If you want to run LT tires because they are designed for a heavier duty than car tires and can serve as an adequate substitute for ST tires due to load rating, that's your prerogative and choice as a consumer. But I think it is a little bit over the top to try to impugn manufacturers for designing specific products for specific duties or consumers for making choices based on those design criteria.

I thought this was an interesting exchange between a consumer and Maxxis.

http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/23890602/print/true.cfm

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The Accident reports of trailer tire failures presents a entirely different picture of trailer & LT tire quality & safety. But the UNREGULATED standards provide a MASSIVE profit margin for all the major tire companies around the world. They simply LOVE the safety standards in force today.

Then we have the LT & trailer tire lovers saying China makes CRAP. DUUUUHHH. All the American tire companies CAN NOT & WILL NOT have any say in the construction of the tires THEY & THEIR OVER GREEDY staffs keep selling to us ?????????

BULL DROPPINGS !

Rich

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The Accident reports of trailer tire failures presents a entirely different picture of trailer & LT tire quality & safety. But the UNREGULATED standards provide a MASSIVE profit margin for all the major tire companies around the world. They simply LOVE the safety standards in force today.

Then we have the LT & trailer tire lovers saying China makes CRAP. DUUUUHHH. All the American tire companies CAN NOT & WILL NOT have any say in the construction of the tires THEY & THEIR OVER GREEDY staffs keep selling to us ?????????

BULL DROPPINGS !

Rich

So,what is your point, Rich? Either the US manufacturers are all greedy SOBs at every level and everything they make is crap, or the ST design criteria itself is a myth and anyone who doesn't run LTs is a fool. You're not being very consistent here, friend.....

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Update….

I'm happy to report that Magic Tilt has honored the warranty and sent me not only a new tire, but also, a tire mounted on a rim. The brand they sent me was Kenda, a brand that I'm not familiar with, but still a Chinese tire.

Not sure what to do with these tires, my gut feeling is to remove them all and replace with Maxxis. That will happen, just not sure as to when.

I have to say that I'm glad that Magic Tilt did the right thing and didn't tell me to go pound sand.

The failed tire eventually burst, even though it was removed from the trailer and hanging on the spare mount.

Image10-3.jpg

The replacement….

Image9-1.jpg

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nkdenton- good research and information posted for the forum members on this controversial subject... but, I must make a disclaimer statement here, I am one of those "Over Greedy Staff Members" of one of those "US Tire Manufacturers" so perhaps I am biased toward the facts being presented.

While I don't think I need to justify the decisions made by all but one of the Major Tire Manufacturers to leave the trailer tire segment, they are business decisions based on segment growth or lack of growth, product margins, plant capacities vs higher margin lines etc... again, strictly business decisions like any other industry. Also, there are no US held Major Tire Manufacturers unless you try to include Cooper, and I can strongly debate why they are not a Major (Industry term; Tier 1).

At any rate, the trailer tire segment has seen a tremendous invasion of offshore products being dumped into the US market over the past several years, some of it is reasonable in quality... alot of it is not.

Best advice, research the brand, research the distributor/importer, buy from a reputable dealer who is willing to stand behind the product they sell but, most importantly, use a tire that is rated to carry the load. Remember, the air carries the load, the capacity rating on the sidewall is at the tires indicated max pressure.

I'm going to stay out of the debate of P-Metric, Light Truck or Specialty Trailer since I'm certain someone will point out I'm not using a proper trailer tire myself... I do tell my kids, "do as I say, not as I do" :) so at least I can say the information has been shared, you can arrive at your own conclusions, we're all big boys here (well most of us).

I have posted on threads relating to tire issues on this and another boat forum (previous brand before I owned Chaparrals) and I've realized, all you can do is put the information out there. There are those who will reject it no matter how or by who the data is presented, hopefully though someone who is interested in learning more will find the information useful in getting the proper tire for their application.

JR

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