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Hatem

NIGHTMARE WAVES!!!

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Hatem is going to the New England Boat Show and trading that bowrider this weekend.

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I'd have to say that as far as seaworthy boat design goes, the transom and overall freeboard is far, far more important than open or closed bow. The bow of the boat will naturally disperse the wave energy to the sides, and the bow is designed to ride up and over the waves. It's pretty uncommon to take a lot of water over the bow, unless you're stuffing it, anyway. Far more common is a boat to get turned around in the bad seas and take the water over the stern. When a wave hits the stern, it's not dispersed like it is at the bow. The energy goes up, which sends the water up and over. On most boats, the stern is also much lower than the bow, meaning it takes a far smaller wave to dump a lot more water in the boat. According to Boat US, the significant majority of boats that founder do so from water over the stern. Modern Chaparrals are self-bailing, which means that what water does come over the bow will mostly drain out through the scuppers. The rest will end up in the bilge, and hopefully the pumps will keep up. Having said that, water that ends up in the bilge will go to the stern, of course, lowering the stern, which amplifies the risk of water over the transom. For this reason, you want bigger pumps in smaller boats.

When you think about it, the vast majority of small to mid-size fishing boats going off shore are open, center console boats, which are no different than a bowrider.

So, all this leads me to one more critical commandment for seamanship in heavy seas: ALWAYS, ALWAYS GET FREE WATER OUT OF THE BOAT IMMEDIATELY. Free water is any water that is sloshing around and free to move around the boat. It has the effect of making your boat exponentially more unstable, as the water adds inertia to the movement of the boat at the same time it pushes the boat lower in the water. Just try tipping a canoe that is dry, then add 3" of water to the canoe, and rock it then. You'll be shocked at how instantly the boat can roll once that water starts moving in the boat.

Everyone that goes offshore with the risk of heavy seas should carry a sea anchor. It's almost like a small parachute that goes in the water. It will keep the bow of the boat pointed into the waves, which will keep the boat safe.

Here's a great video of an open bow boat riding the waves and how the bow breaks up the wave:

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"Modern Chaparrals are self-bailing.."

Friendly correction: MOST Modern Chaps are self-bailing. That was a big selling point to the Admiral and me (we nearly lost our last boat to the bottom of the marina after a torrential downpour filled the bilge and did not have auto-bilge pump activation).

At the boat show a couple of years ago we saw the 244 Sunesta with auto-bailing to the through-hull fittings and offboard...when we opted instead for the 246 SSi, we assumed it was configured the same way but alas our cockpit drains to the bilge. But at least we do have auto-bilge pump activation....

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On, "When you think about it, the vast majority of small to mid-size fishing boats going off shore are open, center console boats, which are no different than a bowrider"

You take a Parker, Boston Whaler, Grady White................................ They are made to go off-shore and deal with these type of waves. Most bowriders are not off-shore boats. Up here in the N.E., I would not go out of the harbor in one!

As to "auto - bailing" If the boat seats too low due to all the water, the scuppers will not work. Pumps will force the water out no matter how low the outlet is.

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I can't understand what those captains were thinking. It looks like they were trying to run a terrible inlet. Why wouldn't they just anchor out until things calm down?

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On, "When you think about it, the vast majority of small to mid-size fishing boats going off shore are open, center console boats, which are no different than a bowrider"

You take a Parker, Boston Whaler, Grady White................................ They are made to go off-shore and deal with these type of waves. Most bowriders are not off-shore boats. Up here in the N.E., I would not go out of the harbor in one!

As to "auto - bailing" If the boat seats too low due to all the water, the scuppers will not work. Pumps will force the water out no matter how low the outlet is.

I understand your point. Offshore fishing boats are vastly different than a typical small runabout (that most people think of as a bowrider) which typically sits very low, has a hull built for speed with shallow deadrise and are intended for inshore or lake use. I was thinking of seaworthy, larger boats, e.g. Hatem's 276. If you compare the bow of a Chaparral 276 to, say, a Boston Whaler Outrage of the same size, they're quite similar.

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I can't understand what those captains were thinking. It looks like they were trying to run a terrible inlet. Why wouldn't they just anchor out until things calm down?

I think its just another day on the Gray River bar for those dudes.

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  I am amazed at people going out in   PRIDICTED HIGH WIND & WAVES.

They take far greater precautions with a car or rising rivers in a coming storm.

We do NOT TEACH children a dam thing worthwhile.  While they are in schools. Certainly nothing about boats or airplanes in bad weather.

Oh well.

But we have people telling them how to fight to save animals & trees.    DUUUHHH  To join & take classes about being the savior of all wild life.  Except their own families & friends.

There are  serious flaws  in bringing up children today.

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