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Rholland

Battery replacement advice requested

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I left my battery switch on and totally drained both batteries. The batteries where bought in 2010. It took 24 hours to charge each battery. I am concerned that because I totally drained the batteries and their age that they could leave me strained. Because I was able to charge the batteries am I go to go? Or should I replace them? Would love to hear some opinions and advice.

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Mine might be an over kill, but I run mine for 2 seasons and replace them. When not running, mine are on a demand charger all the time. Denny.

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I would replace them in the Spring. You have had five summers of use. Replace on your schedule, as it is really hard to push start a boat in the middle of the lake...

brick

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I'd agree -- five years, you're on borrowed time regardless of the latest drawdown/damage. At most, you might get a couple of more seasons. Is it worth it?

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Have them load drain tested at your local auto parts store. Takes a minute and will tell you for sure. I just finished season #7 on a pair of Interstate Marine starting type and they still test good, not great but I charge them monthly in the off season. Pretty impressed with the Interstates though. W

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Wing nuts testing is what I use also.

Problem is no one can predict when a battery will die SUDDENLY............My 2007 YUASU died instantly & during a 2 second cranking in August . Friend & I took the brand new size 27 out of the 16' boat & & we are running it since 2012. I only use size # 27 batteries in anything they will fit into.

I open the seals & check the water level every spring & fall. All batteries go at least 7 years...........Low water kills 99 out of 100 batteries. Works for me. I test cells with a Hygrometer just to catch a early bad cell. Very rare.

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I would buy a marine jump box regardless. Then I would run them until you feel they aren’t holding a good charge. Boating cost enough, no need to add to the cost by buying batteries when you don’t need them. Remember they sell batteries in the middle of the season too lol.

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Have them load drain tested at your local auto parts store. Takes a minute and will tell you for sure. I just finished season #7 on a pair of Interstate Marine starting type and they still test good, not great but I charge them monthly in the off season. Pretty impressed with the Interstates though. W

My Interstates are the originals ('06) too, still going strong.

I charge them for 24 hours after I take them out in the fall, then another 24 in the spring. Good to go. I also keep them in the basement for the winter.

Allthough next spring I should take them to be tested.

.

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Side note for some of us.

If you HAVE to get a tow off season & pay for it ? A new battery might look cheap compared to a tow.

IF IF a tow is even available now. Only boats may not have available drivers for hours.

I leave a $ 50 bill as security at NAPA to borrow Wingnuts load tester. :) No need to remove battery for testing. If you put a normal electrical load on that you would have on during a cruise. Start cranking the engine for about 3 seconds. That is how I now test batteries. Nothing heats up badly in the 3 seconds on all the 5.0Ls I have.

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Problem With some of the battery Jump Boxes ? They may have NICADS.... They do run down fast just sitting around. Forget to recharge them ???

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You are running a dual battery setup. I would install a battery combiner, its easy and there a 3 wire hookup. So no matter how your switch is set, both batteries are being charged. But the engine will only start to how the switch is set.

Most wet-cells are only good for 3 years, AGM batteries go 4 to 8 years. You might want to rotate them out so no one battery is older than the warranty date.

Also, every time I would go out, I would start the engine on the other battery. So today your starting on the #1 battery and tomorrow on #2. This way you know that ether battery alone in in good shape and start your engine.

Every spring clean all your battery connection and use dialectic grease. If you keep up on your batteries, than there would be no need for a jumper box and the need to keep it charged up.

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I have a 3 battery setup with 3-stage charger. All 3 are dual purpose interstate batteries, one for each engine and one house. While at the dock, I leave both battery switches in the off position and the charger on at all times. The batteries are only a year or so old and looks like I am having some issues and am wondering about my protocol. Should the charger be on at all times?

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In addition to my dual battery set-up, I carry a jump start box (also great for jumping other boats) and have an on-board dual bank charger, which is always plugged in when not boating.

brick

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In my history with batteries I have found them to be unpredictable at best. Some seem to never die while others croak at the slightest little discharge. I would check the fluid level and recharge soon, then have them tested to see if they can be re-used. But becasue of their age, you will have to be thinking about replacing them sometime in the near future. However, you might get another year out of them.

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This is why you have two batteries...they won't both die at the same time, or they may, then again, you could get stricked with lightning! Keep them till one dies, then replace both.

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I have a 3 battery setup with 3-stage charger. All 3 are dual purpose interstate batteries, one for each engine and one house. While at the dock, I leave both battery switches in the off position and the charger on at all times. The batteries are only a year or so old and looks like I am having some issues and am wondering about my protocol. Should the charger be on at all times?

What issues are you having?

It might be due, if you have VSRs. If there on, now the charger is looking at one big bank. Depending on the charger, it may not like that.

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This is why you have two batteries...they won't both die at the same time, or they may, then again, you could get stricked with lightning! Keep them till one dies, then replace both.

Thats my point, you have two. If you take care of your battiers, they will take care of you! But, I would not wait until one dies.

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In my history with batteries I have found them to be unpredictable at best. Some seem to never die while others croak at the slightest little discharge. I would check the fluid level and recharge soon, then have them tested to see if they can be re-used. But becasue of their age, you will have to be thinking about replacing them sometime in the near future. However, you might get another year out of them.

Change over to AGM type, there more predictable, output more, last longer and no water.

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So a AGM is the only good type of battery ? All others are dangerous & can not be made to the same power or MORE than a AGM ??? Last at least 2 months ? You need to read the high failure rates of some + $ 300 AGMS over all the years.

If you can not check each cell ? How do you know if a NEW battery is made correctly ??

No battery type is IN REAL WORLD use any better than the other. Good dumb luck is the absolute best thing to have with any battery type.

Since I get between 5 to 8 years on a lead acid type for under $ 100. A ...AGM will ALWAYS last at least 15 to 24 years with a 3X longer free replacement period.

Not going to happen in AGM land.

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So a AGM is the only good type of battery ? All others are dangerous & can not be made to the same power or MORE than a AGM ??? Last at least 2 months ? You need to read the high failure rates of some + $ 300 AGMS over all the years.

If you can not check each cell ? How do you know if a NEW battery is made correctly ??

No battery type is IN REAL WORLD use any better than the other. Good dumb luck is the absolute best thing to have with any battery type.

Since I get between 5 to 8 years on a lead acid type for under $ 100. A ...AGM will ALWAYS last at least 15 to 24 years with a 3X longer free replacement period.

Not going to happen in AGM land.

Can you repeat that?

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I have a 3 battery setup with 3-stage charger. All 3 are dual purpose interstate batteries, one for each engine and one house. While at the dock, I leave both battery switches in the off position and the charger on at all times. The batteries are only a year or so old and looks like I am having some issues and am wondering about my protocol. Should the charger be on at all times?

If its a marine on-board smart charger, then yes, they are intended to be be plugged in when the boat is not in use. Which battery are you having an issue with?

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if you are storing and maintaining a deep cycle battery they should go 5 years. after that your on borrowed time. Will they sometimes die sooner yes. But replacing them every couple of years is a waste. If your concerened take them to auto zone yearly and do a load test.

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It might be due, if you have VSRs. If there on, now the charger is looking at one big bank. Depending on the charger, it may not like that.

You are saying this at the every opportunity you find, and you might be wrong ... statistically 50% of the time. It all depends on how the VSR and the battery charger were wired in relation to the battery switches.

As discussed a year ago or so ... remember this diagram ... there is no chance for VSR to combine the start and house batteries into one big bank when a boat is left at dock with all the switches OFF. If the start battery switch is left ON, and/or the parallel/emergency switch is left ON, this can cause undesired results ... but that is an operator error.

gallery_11046_1006_103433.jpg

I can speculate that not all Chap boats are wired the same way, some are pretty much messed up. Lucky for me, the boat I have was wired correctly ... a three bank charger has two charging ports used and the wires lead to to the right side of the battery switches. It works as expected on my boat, but ... the selling marina and PO had done a lot of electrical troubleshooting, fixing, and rewiring before I've got the boat. If yours is not wired correctly, it is relatively easy to fix it ... no expense, just time and effort are required.

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