Jump to content
Rholland

Battery replacement advice requested

Recommended Posts

In that diagram, you are right. But were did that come from. Is that on the boat in question. Mine is not wired like that and Chap them selfs agree, that they are on when the on board charger is on. Also, I have twin engines

The only way to tell real quickly is, are the VSRs on when connected to shore power/genset and the on board charger is on. Than depending on the charger or chargers. You may end up with a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What issues are you having?

It might be due, if you have VSRs. If there on, now the charger is looking at one big bank. Depending on the charger, it may not like that.

Battery power to everything is fine and engines start fine. "Problem" is that I noticed that the voltage reading to my GPS (and thus the port engine) drops to 9-10V when starting the port engine. Don't know about the starboard engine since it does not power the GPS. Occasionally, the low power alarm flashed on the GPS when trimming the port drive underway.

I was told that this was OK on a separate post, but given the sensitivity of the volvo engine electronics to low power I am a bit concerned. New information.

I checked the voltage on the batteries: 12.5 V alone, 14 V on charger, and 12.5 V on alternators (with engine running).

I checked the cells: specific gravity on the cells varies, but is good, 1.275 to over 1.3.

This suggests that the batteries themselves are OK, yes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Battery power to everything is fine and engines start fine. "Problem" is that I noticed that the voltage reading to my GPS (and thus the port engine) drops to 9-10V when starting the port engine. Don't know about the starboard engine since it does not power the GPS. Occasionally, the low power alarm flashed on the GPS when trimming the port drive underway.

I was told that this was OK on a separate post, but given the sensitivity of the volvo engine electronics to low power I am a bit concerned. New information.

I checked the voltage on the batteries: 12.5 V alone, 14 V on charger, and 12.5 V on alternators (with engine running).

I checked the cells: specific gravity on the cells varies, but is good, 1.275 to over 1.3.

This suggests that the batteries themselves are OK, yes?

did you do a load test, thats the key. Testing voltage really means little, thats just saying the battery is at that charge at the moment. Its a diagnostic method to check the voltage, but nothing that will tell you good or bad. Charge them full and run to auto zone and them load checked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Battery power to everything is fine and engines start fine. "Problem" is that I noticed that the voltage reading to my GPS (and thus the port engine) drops to 9-10V when starting the port engine. Don't know about the starboard engine since it does not power the GPS. Occasionally, the low power alarm flashed on the GPS when trimming the port drive underway.

I was told that this was OK on a separate post, but given the sensitivity of the volvo engine electronics to low power I am a bit concerned. New information.

I checked the voltage on the batteries: 12.5 V alone, 14 V on charger, and 12.5 V on alternators (with engine running).

I checked the cells: specific gravity on the cells varies, but is good, 1.275 to over 1.3.

This suggests that the batteries themselves are OK, yes?

The battery alone should be about 12.6 to 13.2V off the top of my head. The Alt as the charger should be putting out 13.5 to 14V I think that is your problem. Charge voltage is too low. Not sure if there is an adjustment, But I would check and clean or replace your cables as needed. Check your grounds to but I doubt thats were the poor coonection is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are taking that voltage reading at the batteries with a digital volt meter, then take the meter's B+ lead and go to the alternators main B+ post and see. Also, its not a bad idea to have the engine just above idle speed. Since the static voltage and engine running voltage are the same, ide say thats just not low charge output, but no output.

12.5V static sounds about right for a used battery.

You might be surprised how much a simple voltage reading will tell you. A discharged battery, that may be good, just not fully charged, can fail a load test all day long and end up in the core pile. A voltage reading gives you some insight to the batteries environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Age means a Lot to batteries. As they age, the internal resistance gets higher. That usually means the FULLY charged voltage can exceed 14 volts. It also would mean that 12.5 volts would not hold up when cranking.........Large voltage drop in each cell of the battery.

Voltage with a starter cranking is the only true test. If it can not hold at least 12 volts I get rid of them. Many starters start drawing to much current if the battery gets down into the 11. 7 to 11.6 volt ranges on a run down GOOD battery . Continuous 10 to 15 seconds at 11.6 volts is ruining the starter. Engines need to start in 2 to 3 seconds.

Unless the carburetor has the fuel evaporated in it.

I wish someone made a simple 1- 2-3-4- intelligent battery charger....4 hot wires & 1 ground wire.................DONE............Friggin different wiring hook ups are stupid and dangerous. The battery chips are built. Lets use the correct style. My radio control planes have sequential 1 at a time charging.

Same voltage ranges.........Dumb Dumb engineers. If they really can drive a locomotive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In that diagram, you are right. But were did that come from. Is that on the boat in question. Mine is not wired like that and Chap them selfs agree, that they are on when the on board charger is on. Also, I have twin engines

I looked up the Chap wiring schematics you have shared a while ago ... yup, the wiring is massed up by design. Chap follows BEP's dual sensing VSR logic while the VSRs installed are most likely single sensing units ... AND ... at the same time, Chap does not follow BEP's dual sensing VSR logic for connecting the charger ... single bank charger for dual battery/single engine setup, or dual bank charger for triple battery/dual engine setup. I don't know what they were trying to achieve to be honest. The Chap method works, but it is such a waste of dual or triple bank charger capacity and overall health of the batteries.

It is still relatively easy to fix it by moving VSR's sensing lead from the battery terminal of the start battery switch to the engine terminal of that switch ... see blue lead in the updated diagram above. You would need to do it on both engines' battery switches. On the Chap diagram, the charger leads are already connected correctly for this to work ... same as the red leads in the diagram above.

The other more involved way would be to replace the old style VSR with new (digital) DVSR that has ignition control lead/connection that disables sensing when an engine is not energized (dock, storage, etc).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several years ago, I launched the boat and got in to start it. Battery died. I had a 2nd battery that wasn't hooked into the system [ran the ALT bilge pump] and jumped it off of that battery. I carry jump cables.

I usually have 2 batteries but late last year I dropped one and cracked the casing. I didn't replace it. This coming season [6 months] I will replace it. 2 batteries are good to have especially psychologically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I have aged. I become less aware of things that need & should be done.

Solution ? Do more simpler things that require less reliance on FUTURE memory ability. Pull start motors WITH electric starting. Correct LONG oars. Non detachable links on a anchor. ETC. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last spring, I posted information on building a simple two-battery voltage meter for less than $10: http://forum.chaparralboats.com/index.php?showtopic=25489&hl=%2Bvoltage+%2Bmeter

If my engine-on voltage isn't 14.4 (charging) or stabilized engine-off voltage isn't 12.7 (or higher), I start looking for the cause. Monitoring the trend of the charging/storage system is just as important as a periodic load test, if not more important. Start seeing 12.4 volts a few minutes after full charge? -- no argument, time to get a new battery.

Regardless of price, reputation or recommendation, I've never met a battery I trust -- I never hit the water without having two of them, isolated/switched, and fully charged. It's probably the pilot in me, but redundant and properly monitored systems are your friend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regardless of price, reputation or recommendation, I've never met a battery I trust -- I never hit the water without having two of them, isolated/switched, and fully charged. It's probably the pilot in me, but redundant and properly monitored systems are your friend.

Funny, I feel the same way. In addition to three batteries configured into two independent bank I also carry this aux power source that can start the engine in a pinch, power USB devices, inflate the fenders, and light up the work space.

Stanley-J5C09-770x512.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...