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elkhound11

How big for single operator?

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This may have been beaten the death already but I didn't see it on the "search". I'm new to an older Sig29 and it's a far cry from the 19' open bow Bayliner I had. That was a boat that a single person could operate even if the weather got a bit questionable. This Sig29 I have I find hard to operate alone ( docking ). Is this because this boat is really to large for single operation or with time will I just get better at it? I don't see many at my marina running single but when I ask those with boats this size they seem to think single operation is normal.

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I believe that you should be able to run single highhandedly without much problem. When docking, the extra hand certainly would be helpful to handle lines, bumpers etc. but with practice and patience, you overcome your fears. When ever I go solo on a bigger boat, knowing that I have to handle the docking alone, I will have all of the lines already cleated and the fenders in place before I get to the dock. I have all the lines within easy grab distance so I can access them quickly when needed.

The biggest problem is remembering to "never approach a dock faster than you are willing to hit it". :thsmilie_water_119-1:

Good luck!

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I run my Sig 290 often alone. Have the docking lines and boat hook ready to go before you get to the dock. Make sure you have an auto inflate life jacket on and a water proof VHF radio on your belt. A trip plan should be given to someone too.

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Where did you find a place to stick a 290 around Rio Rico? Are you doing the commute to Phoenix or Lake Havasu also?

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Boats that size really don't make a difference if you are running it alone or with other's. They are too big to stop from hitting the dock and if you try, you will more than likely smash a finger or arm. Like other's have said, the trick is having all the lines and bumpers in place before pulling into dock. Then look at the waves or ripples to see where the wind is coming from. I prefer to motor in and if the wind is not too strong, have it blow me into the dock.

Another thing that I do is that I have a loop at the end of my stern line. And as I pull up to the dock, I'll toss the loop over the dock cleat. Then put the boat in gear and it will bring the boat around even with the dock hitting my bumpers. Then I can get off and secure the bow.

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On the 19' I use a line tied to the extreme ends of my dock. Motor in with a coast. When I can grab the dock line.

I bump reverse. then shift to neutral. Then bend over & pull up the full length dock line. I am stopped with the boat against my dock. I have a SHORT mid ship line on the cleat where I steer from. 1 hand still on the long dock line. Move the boat by hand so the boat cleat line can slip over the center dock cleat.

It is easier to do.

Without the long line on the dock. It was VERY iffy in any wind. The clearance is about 1' on each side fender

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I operate my '08 Sig 270, (today's 290), alone and as others have said, I put a line on the mid cleat which can be reached from the cockpit. I find that securing the mid cleat allows me to tie off the stern and bow lines without the boat swinging about.

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I now have a signature 24 but before that I had a 28' flybridge Bayliner. I keep a line from the mid cleat to the back of the boat. When I step off I have a hand on the line, then just pull the boat to me. Works every time.

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Actually, this is more my speed.....Haven't tried it yet, but it seems like a fine plan in theory. I'll have to go practice the next few days....

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That is probably the most incompetent STUNT in calm WIDE OPEN dock space I have ever seen.

Pull his insurance. Notify the dock owner of the stress the guy puts on the dock & cleats backing in & pivioting . There really are brain dead boaters. In NO WIND conditions. Cleat pulls loose ? CRASH into boats straight ahead. OLD DORK !!

DO it in 2 ' high waves & some current.

I will gladly sign that geezers, Commitment Papers.

He is totally gone.

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LOLOL, Cyc! :D That's some funny fun stuff, ma man. You're on the one end of the crazy debate that video has sparked on YouTube since it was uploaded a while back. When I saw that about a year ago, I read many of the comments and you had the one group that trashed the guy like you just did (which is very understandable) and an equally energized and opposing group which claims it's in idle and hardly a danger etc. Very fun stuff. :)

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I'm with Cyc on that one. You wouldn't get out of your car with the engine running and in drive so why would you do it with a boat?

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Going from a 19 to a 29 is a pretty big step. docking with a small boat without a lot of experience is usually done by the "Get close and grab on" method. no need to hone skills. But go to a Marina and watch some experiencd boaters with their tenders and you will see them slip right up to the dock at an angle,steer to port and as the boat starts to kick the aft end of the boat towards the dock they shift to reverse and swing the wheel the opposite direction and settle nicely against the dock in neutral. All done so smooth, it's like one motion. You should have been practicing those skills with the smaller boat. Your 29 has more mass so go slow and have the lines ready.All the people you have on board won't make up for experience

As far as the video,I side with Cyclops...naturally..... cleat pulls loose, boats in gear UNMANED and who knows what. I also thought about the crunch on the Port corner of the boat.. I have performed this maneuver using a piling.

Boat US has an excellant CD on docking under different situations. It can also be viewed on their website.

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Going from a 19 to a 29 is a pretty big step. docking with a small boat without a lot of experience is usually done by the "Get close and grab on" method. no need to hone skills. But go to a Marina and watch some experiencd boaters with their tenders and you will see them slip right up to the dock at an angle,steer to port and as the boat starts to kick the aft end of the boat towards the dock they shift to reverse and swing the wheel the opposite direction and settle nicely against the dock in neutral. All done so smooth, it's like one motion. You should have been practicing those skills with the smaller boat. Your 29 has more mass so go slow and have the lines ready.All the people you have on board won't make up for experience

As far as the video,I side with Cyclops...naturally..... cleat pulls loose, boats in gear UNMANED and who knows what. I also thought about the crunch on the Port corner of the boat.. I have performed this maneuver using a piling.

Boat US has an excellant CD on docking under different situations. It can also be viewed on their website.

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Or why not stay at the helm and keep bumping the motor til it swings around then when it does put it in neutral and then get out and tie the bow line.

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Going from a 19 to a 29 is a pretty big step. docking with a small boat without a lot of experience is usually done by the "Get close and grab on" method. no need to hone skills. But go to a Marina and watch some experiencd boaters with their tenders and you will see them slip right up to the dock at an angle,steer to port and as the boat starts to kick the aft end of the boat towards the dock they shift to reverse and swing the wheel the opposite direction and settle nicely against the dock in neutral. All done so smooth, it's like one motion. You should have been practicing those skills with the smaller boat. Your 29 has more mass so go slow and have the lines ready.All the people you have on board won't make up for experience

As far as the video,I side with Cyclops...naturally..... cleat pulls loose, boats in gear UNMANED and who knows what. I also thought about the crunch on the Port corner of the boat.. I have performed this maneuver using a piling.

Boat US has an excellant CD on docking under different situations. It can also be viewed on their website.

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I have a boating friend who handles his 55 footer by himself. He is retired Coast Guard, and makes it look easy. I wish I could handle my 220 as well...

brick

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:thththsoapbox2-1::thththsoapbox2-1::thththsoapbox2-1::thththsoapbox2-1:

I am embarrassed. I Did that with the little 16' aluminum with the 15" transom & 9.9 hp.

I pulled my shoulder freeing the anchor as a storm built up almost 3' waves. Came at the protected side of the T floater. Wind grabbed the light bow so I gunned the stern inward to catch a cleat with the stern line. Wind had the boat swung almost straight out. 1 good arm. other just hanging down in severe pain. No Ibuprofin or water. I could have then just waited for the pain to drop & manhandle the bow in.

I put it in forward & increased power until the bow pinned the dock. Fell & rolled onto the dock to tie up.......Bad. Really bad day docking.

Some days the dock wins.

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