Fierofiend

New to boating, picked up a 1930 SS project.

120 posts in this topic

Hello all, I recently picked up my first boat, a 1999 1930 SS. I'm new to boats/boating and was browing craigslist one day and stumbled across this chaparral. It was used very little, but sat outside uncovered for most its life. The upholstery is all pretty much ruined and the interior fiberglass will require some scrubbing/powerwashing.

The 4.3L engine only has about 93 hours on it, and so far seems to be okay. Unfortunately it has the 1piece manifolds, but I'm hoping they'll be fine for a while. The Alpha2 drive looks like the anodes were never changed, however, has apparenlty had a recent gimbal change and new bellows.

On the bright side, I got the boat for very cheap, and I decided it was time to start a boat project instead of another car project. With that said, I've gained a lot of knowledge just from reading these forums the past month or so, and I'm sure I'll have many questions to come. Thanks for the space to share my story!

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As you can see, I've got a long road ahead of me!

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This looks like one heck of a good project boat.

Interior just takes some deer to fix. Find a good auto upholstry shop and they can have all that looking brand new.

The engine looks clean and that is usually a good sign.

The Alpha outdrive is easy to work on and not too many deer if you have to replace.

After you get her back in good shape I would invest in a good mooring cover to protect all that work.

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How is the power? By the pictures, the gel coat and hull looks fine. Put some deer in the upholstery is all I see

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Indy, your boat looks great! I have already scrubbed and powerwashed the front bow section. I have removed the 3 cushions and filler piece and have dropped them of at a local upholster to be recovered. Depending on my satisfaction, I will remove the rear sections and have the same place do those next. The 'backrest' pieces of the bow seemed rather challenging to remove so I purchased some SEM soap/prep/dye to try to 'refurbish' what is already there. Luckily, none of the backrest parts are damaged, just dirty looking. Some scrubbing helped, but I've heard good things about the SEM product line. The white front cup holders have also been replaced for stainless steel variants.

DePo, I don't know the power of the boat yet. Due to the price/selling conditions, I decided to just tow it home and worry about my satisfaction with the 4.3L some other time. I don't really know what I plan to do (cruise, float around, tow tubers) just yet, as this is the very first boat related thing I've touched. I do plan to pick up some SmartTabs based on what I've read on this forum, but I'm hoping that as long as it moves I'll be excited.

Here are some pics of the Hull:

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Welcome to our group. I always admire you restoration guys and love to see your work. I don't have the facilities for it or I'd get sucked into it, too.

Good luck!

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Drain the stern drive oil out into a pan. Look for water getting into it.. Will have a coffee with cream color. Just like a car with oily water.

Same thing with removing the oil from the engine & checking for water in that oil.

Check both oils FOR METAL CHIPS IN THE OIL.

You may get lucky

Recovering old outdoor rain soaked foam is risky due to very high risk of damp foam out of sight still wet. Covering it is a 50 50 gamble. Most molds grow in 15% to about 60% humidity. SOOO If there is enough water to saturate the ol crumbly foam to over 75%. O K. Or it is dry below 10% ? O K also.

When you want to run the engine ? Biggest risk is the water pump inside the stern drive housing. It could be shot. If the rubbery blades have set & are stuck to the impellor housing? They may tear off & float around the engine & cause a partial blockage & later erratic over heating @ WOT runs............I would not try running the engine until you are ready for taking the drive off for a alignment check & impellor check & replace the impellor with a Mercruiser impellor only & compression check. Well you know the steps with a neglected motor .

Hope they drained the motor by removing drain plugs & or hoses... Or filling it with antifreeze. Hope the block is not split somewhere from the freezing temperatures.

Check the engine & drive with some marine advice.

Is a lot of that engine really as new as parts appear ? Hopefully?

Good luck with the project.

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The 'backrest' pieces of the bow seemed rather challenging to remove so I purchased some SEM soap/prep/dye to try to 'refurbish' what is already there. Luckily, none of the backrest parts are damaged, just dirty looking. Some scrubbing helped, but I've heard good things about the SEM product line. The white front cup holders have also been replaced for stainless steel variants.

The backrest pieces are usually accessible with some creative thinking. I am betting the front vertical cushion in the bow has bolts that are accessible from the anchor locker.

Forgot to mention that your trailer looks like its in really good condition as well. HOWEVER....... no matter HOW GOOD the tires look you need to replace them if they are over 5+ yrs old. Would hate to see you lose a great boat due to old tires. Also you should check the brakes and a brake fluid change never hurts.

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FYI, that hull looks really familiar... I am pretty sure the 1930 is the same (or really close to the Model Year 200X 216/220 hulls) that have a famous reputation for excellent ride and performance (yeah I guess I am a bit biased). ;-)

Shep, back me up on this??

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Cyclops, I have the manuals but I haven't poked around the drive unit much just yet. I'll be sure to do the things you mentioned when we thaw from this ice storm. I'm still not sure if I should pull the drive unit off, or put it in the water first. The entire drive needs to be painted, so maybe pulling would be easier, I don't really know. The engine was winterized by the previous owner and I have a handful of blue plastic plugs in the glove box. I don't know how many there are supposed to be, but I was told that everything was drained and the engine is dry. The gas tank is topped off and I was told that appropriate stabilizers were added. The engine is in very good shape visually. The water separator? (white filter looking thing bottom left) was recently replaced, the belt looks good, battery is recent and the oil looks/smells okay. I'll find out more once i attempt to start it.

Indy, I was able to get at the center backrest, but the two sides seemed to be a stretch. The trailer is also in visual good shape. One of the lights was filled with water and I have replaced it, and I will need to do some rewiring to my liking, as I don't like the blue scotch-lock wiring tap things that are currently in place. The tires are good, though I will need to inspect the bearings in the near future. I don't think the single axle trailer has brakes.

Also, I don't know much about the hull (Heck I didn't even know what a Chaparral was until after I bought this one and realized what a great boat they are!!) From what I've read the swim platform for this boat is the same as 04-09 190 SSi (667-190 Pattern 3-1175). If things turn out well with this boat, I'll probably look to add one as others here have done.

Here is a recent picture with its new cover waiting for some TLC. I added an add'l bow pole (cover only came with one) as that area started to pool a bit.

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So here is my first 'real' help question to this thread... When I was washing the bow section, the water was draining back into the ski locker area, and pooling up, NOT draining as fast as I thought it should. The water that was trickling into the bilge area (and out the rear drain) was speckled with crud. I pointed the hose at the rear drain of the ski locker and gave a few quick blasts, I noticed the water was just shooting back into the locker and didn't speed up the drain to bilge at all. I pulled the gas tank cover and found this:

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I sucked up most of the crap with the shop vac, and also power washed the entire area and around the tank. As I was doing so, all this crap was pouring into the bilge area and draining out. I tried to spray around all sides of the tank, and even under it from the bilge area. This seemed to help the ski locker drain but it will still need more work. My question now is what was the purpose of the black tape from the gas tank to the fiberglass? Was it to seal the area to keep debris from getting between the fiberglass/tank and trapped under the tank? It was deteriorated and all came off when I pressure washed the area. Should I replace the tape before I put the tank access panel back in?

Thanks!

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You will have a project That does away with the simplicity of a auto rebuild that you are used to.

At this point a call to Chaparral is in order. They may or may not be able to help you with were & how the fuel tank is secured. If it is able to handle E 10% Ethanol. Or where the hoses to it run. Or if you can check that the hose clamps are snug enough. Be EXTREMELY careful with wiith that pressure hose . It can rip wires off of a gas tank accidently. Did that one. Check where the tank wires are on the tank. all the water around it & icing can expand the ice & cause some squeezing in of the tank, hoses, & wiring Rust wiring nuts Or screws.

We will not see to much of you this spring. Make it a love project. Not a forced march into strange territory. I still help other older boaters on restoring parts of the oldies.

Check the battery water levels in each cell. Add distilled water to cover the cell. Do a CAREFULLY constantly checked recharge at a low rate. Check battery cells for equal acid concentrations at the end..........or pull the battery & use one of your known good ones.

First starting of the engine MUST / should be done with the boat STILL FULLY strapped to the trailer !!! FOR SAFETY reasons. Back the stern in so the drive is far enough into the water to be sure the drive water pump IS COVERED BY WATER. The strapped down boat prevents a sweet sounding boat from being taken out & you can not shift gears OR the throttle sticks at W O T. Power steering does not really work. Neither does the tilt up or down. Gauges shoot up to super hot & you have to anchor. If there is any anchor or long enough rope.

Stay on the trailer until all test runs are perfect.

I love bringing back the dead to life again. Very satisfying . Enjoy. :)

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Welcome and nice boat! Check out my thread, It may help some. I would go ahead and try to run the engine. If It works, great, If not then you will need to do a compression test, leak Down test to see if it is repairable. As for all of that crud and the ripped upholstery...First thing I'd do is make sure the wood in the boat is solid. With standing water in the hull, I don't like the chances...you Will need to look and feel around. Check the transom, motor mount stringers, deck, ski locker, rear bulkhead, and all of the wooden seat bases. Break out the hammer and see if anything feels soft, sounds hollow, or has visible delamination. If you find rot, you'll have to make the repair which can be done! You have a fiberglass floor, so you should be good there, but everything underneath could still be bad! I had a regal rot bucket that had an interior like yours. Granted It had a wood floor, wood seat bases, and was not nearly as nice of a boat, but still inspect the boat structure first! Good luck and welcome!

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The 1930 SS was the previous model to the 2001-2002 186 SSi and 2003 only 190 SSi. VERY deep 20 degree deadrise allows that hull to handle rough chop for its actual hull length. Personal preference, but I really like the Sport seating.

If everything checks out okay with your boat, (stringers, etc.) than adding an extended swim platform (either factory, or the 85" Classic - Transom mount from swimplatformsuperstore.com would really be the way to go.

http://www.swimplatformsuperstore.com/Chaparral_1930.html

Additionally, if you wanted more power, you could install an Edelbrock intake and 4 bbl carburetor kit to raise your HP rating from 190 to roughly 205. This addition helped our boat with the same engine gain more performance with no drawbacks in ease to start, and still returns decent fuel economy.

You have a good handling and riding boat there.

Chris

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I was surprised when I was disassembling the small parts at the lack of noticeable wood. The seat and cushions are all plastic, which is nice. The engine cover is wood, and will require some TLC at the supports, but this appears to be common. Other than walking on the boat, which seems solid, how should I check the motor mounts, stringers, transom, etc?

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I was surprised when I was disassembling the small parts at the lack of noticeable wood. The seat and cushions are all plastic, which is nice. The engine cover is wood, and will require some TLC at the supports, but this appears to be common. Other than walking on the boat, which seems solid, how should I check the motor mounts, stringers, transom, etc?

Break out a hammer and start tapping!

Hollow sound=rot

Soft=rot

Fiberglass separating from wood core=rot

Any transom leaks other than bellows=most likely a rotten transom (happened to me)

Motor mount bolts are easy to wiggle/ aren't in straight=rot

Rust stains coming from screw holes=rot

You should also drill core samples of the motor mounts, rear bulkhead, stringers, transom, etc. If you get dry wood, you're good! Wet mulch is rot...If dry, then fill the holes with 3m 5200 and start on the seats!

Your boat has a fiber glass liner over a wood floor, wood stringer/bulkhead system, wood transom, wood sunpad and bench seat base, wood trim panels, wood motor mount boxes, and balsa core wood in the top cap. You can see how your boat was made here: http://forum.chaparralboats.com/publications/brochures/1999/ss_series.pdf

Your boat is very similar to mine except for the fiberglass liner, xl-plywood stringers/bulkheads/deck/transom (I have regular marine plywood)! Enjoy and good luck! :beer-7687-1:

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Drew, thanks for all the info! I'll do some banging around and see how things are, though I don't know that drilling core samples is something I'm comfortable with just yet. Guess I have some decisions to make about that one.

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Drew, thanks for all the info! I'll do some banging around and see how things are, though I don't know that drilling core samples is something I'm comfortable with just yet. Guess I have some decisions to make about that one.

You'd rather drill core samples than the alternative...trust me on that one lol...I almost had an outdrive fall off on my Regal before I knew it was rotten...My dad had a boat about 40 years ago with an outboard and a rotten transom (he didn't know) and the transom snapped and his engine sank to the bottom. Core samples are really the only way to know. Chap makes very good boats, but they still need to be cared for. Fiberglass floor liner and plastic seat bases work to your advantage, but standing water does not! You will have to see. Check out our other forum too! We have a lot of tips/ tricks that we don't post here because we don't want to clog up the forum for others who don't need it! I really love the SS line of bowriders. They are great boats and will serve you will. Mine is mint after 20 years which speaks to Chap's quality and proper care. Yours will be mint soon too! One thing I will say about upholstery repairs is that it is worth EVERY PENNY to pay extra for high quality materials. I see so many used boats with shoddy vinyl repairs and it just ruins them IMO. Take it to an expert and have him match the factory patterns because they were awesome! Some of your vinyl looks okay, just clean it up and polish it with some protectant! You may even want to look into flexible vinyl paint for the areas that are faded/worn, but not ripped or crakced. I've seen that stuff work well over at iboats! Welcome to both forums, I saw you joined ours too :clapsmiley:

It's sad to me that some one would neglect such a nice boat like that... :thththsoapbox2-1:

Kudos to you for fixing her up! Mine was mechanically neglected (owner had health problems, kept her at a marina dry racked, untouched for 11 years after using the boat for 8), but I fixed all that and am now doing a bunch of upgrades! These SS boats LAST, I've enjoyed mine immensely and have probably been out 40 times in the last 5 months.

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Just a quick note to welcome you to the group. I don't have anything to add beyond the good advice already posted in this thread. Good luck with your project. That's a great looking boat, and a very good hull from what I understand. It'll be a blast when it's done.

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One thing I will say about upholstery repairs is that it is worth EVERY PENNY to pay extra for high quality materials. I see so many used boats with shoddy vinyl repairs and it just ruins them IMO. Take it to an expert and have him match the factory patterns because they were awesome! Some of your vinyl looks okay, just clean it up and polish it with some protectant! You may even want to look into flexible vinyl paint for the areas that are faded/worn, but not ripped or crakced.

Thanks for the additional tips, as always. The front cushions are being done in Omnova Nautolex, which the upholster said was his preferred grade of marine vinyl. Also, I plan to do the paint thing for the other areas, and have already purchased the complete 'system' for when it warms up.

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Thanks for the additional tips, as always. The front cushions are being done in Omnova Nautolex, which the upholster said was his preferred grade of marine vinyl. Also, I plan to do the paint thing for the other areas, and have already purchased the complete 'system' for when it warms up.

Well there you go! Marine vinyl is a must. Cheap grade vinyl would look like your boat after a few years of use! Not 16 years of being uncovered in the elements...

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The 1930 is a great boat. One trouble spot is the gas strut hinge area on the sport seating sunpad/motor cover, which is prone to rot.

brick

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Aww, man, not Frisco Jarrett! That series is epic.

Now look what you've done. Fierofiend is probably half way through a twelve pack thinking about wet stringers and fifteen weeks of driveway project.

Here's to dry stringers and a solid, well built hull. :beer-7687-1:

Anyway, Fierofiend, if you do need to do structural work, that series Drew posted is an amazing education. Frisco knows his stuff. Even if you don't need to do all that to your boat, which hopefully you don't, it's worth watching just to get an understanding of how these things are built.

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I hope Drew didn't scare the crap out of you with that! :slap: He was trying to make a good point, though.

Your boat is hopefully fine, but as the video shows, it's all worth checking out.

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One trouble spot is the gas strut hinge area on the sport seating sunpad/motor cover, which is prone to rot.

Luckily, the cover isn't showing signs of rot, but the hinge mount area was repaired by the previous owner. It's not the best looking repair, but it'll work for now until I get the more important items taken care of.

I did watch those videos, and feel for that guy. He bought what he thought was lake ready and got something much different. I'll do the tap tap tap and drill if I suspect anything. If I do end up finding rot as in those videos, I'll just sell the boat and realize why I never got into them in the first place. I don't have that much dedication to get into 'this' boat that deep. Hopefully it'll warm up here soon and I can start digging into this thing.

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