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ericlemson

Tongue weight on a 244 or 246??

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I'm trying to spec in a weight distribution hitch for my vehicle, but won't pick up the trailer until a week or two. Does anyone know there tongue weight on their 244 or 246?

Thanks in advance!

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I know this isn't a direct answer to your question, but your setup is going to be different from other's, therefore your tongue weight is going to be different. The best thing to find the answer for your situation is to know total weights of your setup and then calculate your tongue weight based on the recommendation of a max 10% of total trailer weight. I know it's tough since you don't have your trailer yet, but you previously estimated 6,250# (which I bet you will be pretty darn close on as long as your trailer weight is accurate). If you still feel that is a valid estimation then expect a tongue weight of 625#. You can get away with less tongue weight on a tandem trailer and many boat trailer manufacturers say 5-7% for a boat trailer. The lighter the tongue, the more sway you will have; the heavier the tongue, the more weight on your vehicle inducing sag and stress on the hitch. If you plan for 500# which is the class III limit, that puts you at 8% which is about where mine rides. It all comes down to the individual setup and how it rides. When setting it up be sure to take it on the highway and let some 18 wheelers pass you to see how it reacts, as well as some short stops and make adjustments as necessary.

Back to the question at hand though, I would spec one that can handle at least 10% of your expected max trailer/boat/gear weight.

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Rule of thumb, it should about 9 to 10% of the load weight. Meaning add the boat, trailer, and anything in the boat. Some boats have bigger gas tanks than others,

It is real easy to weigh the tongue with a bathroom scale.

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When I was a kid I worked at a marina and one of the jobs I would do is slide the axel(s) of the trailer forward or back to adjust the tongue weight. I assume the same thing can still be done on today's trailers. My reason for saying this is you can set your tongue weight for what you need for safe, practical trailering.

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P.S. Assuming you have an overhead lift, this job is easy enough that a high school kid could do it quickly. But without an overhead lift it could be a real pita since there is fine tuning involved; move it 4 inches, then 2", then back 1/2". Net net, the place you buy the trailer ought to be able to do this.

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My dealer mentioned he'd help me adjust the boat and trailer when I get it.

Reason for my question is I've been looking at a WD hitch with a tounge weight limit of 1,000 lbs - thinking that more is better. However, from talking to etrailer, they said using a WD hitch that's well over your real requirement creates a stiff ride. Therefore, I want to be more in actual range I expect. As mike mentioned, I've estimated the max weight to be 6250 or so. It sounds like 6-7k WD hitch with a 10% tongue weight limit is the way to go. Then, the dealer can help me fine tune the setup based on actual ride.

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The WD hitch spring bars should be adjustable, so so even if you get a monster hitch, you only apply the amount of sprung force on the hitch that you need. Not sure if that makes sense. But I agree that if you've found a 6-7K# hitch, you should be good.

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Yes, you can use a bathroom scale and it I does not have to do that high. Again, you need to know how to do it.

I have seen some trailer manufactures suggest using a bathroom scale. I know Loadrite does.

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