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What we did to our new to us 2006 256 SSI over the winter

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I would like to tell you did nice video and great work. How did you do the woodgrain so nice my woodgrain needs attention looking for ideas

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Hatem,

1. I have a blast cabinet and compressor and did all of the pieces myself, except the main piece of the drive. Due to the size I took that to a local powdercoater for blasting. We talked at length about what could be blasted and where he had to stay away from, then I used gorilla tape, regular blue painters tape, and large ziplock bags to protect areas I didn't want blasted. Just make sure it is aluminum oxide media.

2. The evercoat metal to metal sets up really fast and seems to be really strong. I used it because after all my reading I decided it was the strongest. It sands pretty quickly, I used a pneumatic random orbit sander with aluminum oxide paper 150 and 220. I also used a block sander by hand for a lot of the parts.

3. The acid wash I used was metalprep 79, and alodine 1201, because of the components of the cast aluminum used by Volvo. If you used these things be sure to read all of the MSDS sheets for them, understand the dangers, use protective gear, and dispose of it properly. It is pretty nasty stuff. But the process was when the part was sanded and ready for paint, I would scrub it (using a maroon scotchbrite pad) with metalprep79. This is the acid wash, it removes any surface corrosion and gets rid of oils and contaminants from touching with bare hands, ect. The key is not to let it dry between these steps. Now rinse off the Metalprep. Be sure to rinse all of it off, no scrubbing, just water. Now apply the alodine and allow it to sit the required amount of time base on temperature (usually about 3 minutes in my case, but do not let it dry) then rinse well using water. Hang to dry, do not heat, prime within 24 hours.

4. Chromate coating is the what is produce by the alodine 1201 chemically reacting to the bare aluminum. Paint does not stick to aluminum well, But it sticks very well to the chromate coating. It is the golden hue after treatment.

5. Primer was a two part epoxy primer from interlux, then covered that primer with Volvo rattle can primer (to ensure compatibility with the topcoat).

6&7. The topcoat color and the clear were Volvo rattle cans. I know everyone boos spray cans, but these actually atomized better than most spray cans I have ever used, so I went with them. Time will tell if I made the right choice.

8. The props I polished with a 10 inch polishing wheel on a Eastwood polisher. Used their stainless polish followed by the white rouge. Did that on days it was too humid or cold to do anything else.

Hope that answers you questions. I am by no means a professional, I am very handy with tools and like to learn new process', but this one was interesting because so many people have very strong opinions on how this should be done. I read a ton online before I got started, picked this method because it made sense to me, and also because it was in the Volvo manual that way. I trust the manufacturer about 95% of the time, but it still has to pass my common sense test.

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wijeff,

For the wood grain on the panels I considered using a vinyl stick on (that is what most people do) but I had wanted to learn something new and had the time this winter so I hydro dipped them. Good experience, took some time and a few tries to get it right. Turns out to be more of art than I thought. I got the kit here http://www.mydipkit.com/index.html for about 100 deer.

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Hatem,

1. I have a blast cabinet and compressor and did all of the pieces myself, except the main piece of the drive. Due to the size I took that to a local powdercoater for blasting. We talked at length about what could be blasted and where he had to stay away from, then I used gorilla tape, regular blue painters tape, and large ziplock bags to protect areas I didn't want blasted. Just make sure it is aluminum oxide media.

2. The evercoat metal to metal sets up really fast and seems to be really strong. I used it because after all my reading I decided it was the strongest. It sands pretty quickly, I used a pneumatic random orbit sander with aluminum oxide paper 150 and 220. I also used a block sander by hand for a lot of the parts.

3. The acid wash I used was metalprep 79, and alodine 1201, because of the components of the cast aluminum used by Volvo. If you used these things be sure to read all of the MSDS sheets for them, understand the dangers, use protective gear, and dispose of it properly. It is pretty nasty stuff. But the process was when the part was sanded and ready for paint, I would scrub it (using a maroon scotchbrite pad) with metalprep79. This is the acid wash, it removes any surface corrosion and gets rid of oils and contaminants from touching with bare hands, ect. The key is not to let it dry between these steps. Now rinse off the Metalprep. Be sure to rinse all of it off, no scrubbing, just water. Now apply the alodine and allow it to sit the required amount of time base on temperature (usually about 3 minutes in my case, but do not let it dry) then rinse well using water. Hang to dry, do not heat, prime within 24 hours.

4. Chromate coating is the what is produce by the alodine 1201 chemically reacting to the bare aluminum. Paint does not stick to aluminum well, But it sticks very well to the chromate coating. It is the golden hue after treatment.

5. Primer was a two part epoxy primer from interlux, then covered that primer with Volvo rattle can primer (to ensure compatibility with the topcoat).

6&7. The topcoat color and the clear were Volvo rattle cans. I know everyone boos spray cans, but these actually atomized better than most spray cans I have ever used, so I went with them. Time will tell if I made the right choice.

8. The props I polished with a 10 inch polishing wheel on a Eastwood polisher. Used their stainless polish followed by the white rouge. Did that on days it was too humid or cold to do anything else.

Hope that answers you questions. I am by no means a professional, I am very handy with tools and like to learn new process', but this one was interesting because so many people have very strong opinions on how this should be done. I read a ton online before I got started, picked this method because it made sense to me, and also because it was in the Volvo manual that way. I trust the manufacturer about 95% of the time, but it still has to pass my common sense test.

Franz, thanks very much, really, for taking the time and answering every single question in great detail!

There's a lot more behind every single one of those steps and the other thing is the know-how. Knowing the materials and how they react and how to use them (like the different steps of the acid wash and Adoline and being sure not to let them dry in between). Not too many, if any would've picked up on that little step.

I found it really interesting that you used the Evercoat and why more don't use a metal based compound as opposed to the standard Bondo filler that most guys will use even on drives and marine applications. I don't even think there is a dedicated, marine version they just use the auto body filler to fill in the pits but your choice makes so much more sense. Using the former is probably a combination of not knowing any better and budget.

Great stuff, thanks again.

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Hatem,

The Evercoat is a two part mixture. It is very much like marine-tex in the way it is mixed and sands. I think one of the other important items to note when using it to fill iin little corrosion dimples or etch marks is that it must adhere to a CLEAN surface on the metal. Meaning that you must either sand blast or use a pin scaler to remove absolutley all of the corrsion from the pit or it will continue to corrode under the repair. I keep my boat in a botel, but I will post pics again at the end of the season to see how she holds up.

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Yes, very cool. I meant to ask you that also but forgot - to keep us posted on how it holds up for the season. I have a feeling it's going to look exactly the same as when you first launched.

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Franz, you were 100% correct about the water not coming out of the outdrive inlets once you crank the engine when using the flushport connection. I couldn't find the other thread where you mentioned that and I had questioned it because I didn't remember it doing that and then we thought maybe it was low water pressure at your end. But today while getting ready to launch I thought I'd run the motor and check all systems in the driveway and take a look and see if that happens and sure enough! It stopped immediately once the engine cranked and only came out the exhaust just like you said!

Sorry I ever doubted you! :)

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I've been meaning to ask you for a while now how did the drive hold up for the season? Did it all go well and any particular problems or none whatsoever? Thx.

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I haven't taken any pictures this year, but I have been upgrading and improving. Added Seadek at the end of the season last year, and now I am replacing the stock speakers and adding some hidden LED lighting, Had a small leak on my steering actuator so I replaced that as well. We had no issues with the drive last year. It still looks good, could use a bath from the winter dust, but I'll take some pictures this weekend and post them.

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We had no issues with the drive last year. It still looks good, could use a bath from the winter dust, but I'll take some pictures this weekend and post them.

That's great. Knowing you did all that incredible restoration work on that drive to the point where it looks better than a new one, it would've sucked if you had any problems with it. So, great news.

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That trailer certainly has plenty of rollers to provide adequate support. Nice... W

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I found a few pictures I took in October when I pulled it for the winter. If it still looks like this at the end of the second season I guess Ill call it a win.SAM_5336_zpsabmmchlj.jpgSAM_5338_zpsnbdwzfhh.jpgSAM_5337_zpsq9qonmqi.jpg

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Fantastic! Still looks amazing and the props look great too. This is why I opened that other thread because of this reason. But you don't slip, right? So it's just too bad that there isn't a clear protectant that is as effective as that Pacifica antifouling tar. I mean, I don't mind bottom paint even though I'm having second thoughts about that too lol, but I think that will need to be done but to cover such a beautiful drive with a black tar substance is blasphemous! Even though mine doesn't look nearly as good as yours yet, still, it would be a shame.

Thanks for taking the time to post those.

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