scottjen26

Question on fenders / dock lines

37 posts in this topic

I got 4 other boats to line up at our entrance after many years of silt build up.

We anchored with rear bridle setups about 20' apart. Anchors really dug in. Then made a perfectly horizontal line across the inlet. We all powered up for about 5 minutes at 2000 rpms. Shut down. Kept moving forward to deep protected dock area. Had to do it 3 times. Make sure our anchors would hold that way if needed.

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Perfect tom. That is all that is needed. Even long term docking ..............only.............needs to be safe. Not to look like a contest is in progress.

I take the really long dock lines & run them along side the other cleats. Neat & safe also......More than 1 way to do a job.

Nobody referred to it as being a "contest". It had everything to do with a previous discussion about GOOD SEAMANSHIP for newbies to learn, something you might've either forgotten about or don't remember.

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I did not attend the course. I am grandfathered in by the. " To old to teach anything new to. "

I do stoop down to a line that is sloppy & a hazard to the blind & texters. Mine are clump coiled, with a half hitch to keep it safe.

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Looks like HG has a little OCD. Obsessive Coiling Disorder. :haha-7383:

Hahaha, good one. I probably have many types of obsessive disorders. :)

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Hahaha, good one. I probably have many types of obsessive disorders. :)

Don't we all? I think owning a boat could be considered a disorder by some.

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Don't we all? I think owning a boat could be considered a disorder by some.

Yep. Hey.......what? :slap:

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Don't we all? I think owning a boat could be considered a disorder by some.

Yep. For me I think it's a bit different than most and correct me if I'm wrong, I mean, I've done 0 boating (some very minor stuff and mostly charters etc.) but to actually buy a boat at 48 for the first time, as opposed to many who have been boating since they were kids, so it's a complete lifestyle change and there's this novelty that hasn't worn out. It makes me wonder if that "drive" stays the same all the time or does it eventually cool down. My summers used to be quite busy with many other types of activities that now have been eliminated because of wanting to get out on the boat.

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I was almost born on a boat, been on and off them my whole life since. At 55, my disorder has not improved and has only gotten worst. I believe I suffer from CBS (chronic boating syndrome) not to be confused with twofootitus which is a secondary symptom of CBS. No novelty here.

What was the topic of this thread again. Oh yea dock lines, yes I use them.

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I was almost born on a boat, been on and off them my whole life since. At 55, my disorder has not improved and has only gotten worst. I believe I suffer from CBS (chronic boating syndrome) not to be confused with twofootitus which is a secondary symptom of CBS. No novelty here.

And we (my son and I) got the pleasure to experience that experience on hands and it was amazing to see veteranship at work. :)

And I'm the opposite, in the sense that I'm getting into it late in life which explains the over-excitement and the emphatic posts and picture posting that tends to backfire and rub a few people the wrong the way, sadly, it's too bad, but it is what it is. Dock lines was a big part of the learning curve and we would go to the extreme at all times just to either practice it and have it embedded in us or just as part of the learning process.

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I do not think docking lines at the master level is ever required. If carefull trip planning took place first.

Watched a cruiser come to her slip in high wind , waves & current. Boat was large enough to have a foot of clearance each side. Pulls up to about 5 ' from dock & a hefty line is tossed to a person on the dock. He is fed plenty of line as the docker runs the line around a piling off center in his slip. End of line goes back to the boats bow. Now I REALLY am interested !! Line is tied off to a sturdy bow cleat. Then I see the boat back out slightly to snug the line. Few seconds later the anchor windlass starts running. Slick operator.

Gentile reverse & rudder angles. Straight in. Considering water conditions. Took a few minutes longer than a calm water docking.

If he had planned better to NOT go out ? I would never have said. " Well done. You smarty. ". He, I & his crew all were smiling.

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