James897

Generator & Air Conditioner

14 posts in this topic

I've just purchased a 2005 26' Signature and wanted to add a generator and Air. I'm confused while looking at the old units and part numbers. I could use some help if anyone knows where I need to start. Looking at gas 110V 60 HZ mounted in the engine well but I'm not sure if this would be what I need nor do I have a clue on the AC unit.

Please Help

James

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I'd say that's a lot of work and expensive to add both of those units. Is it pre-wired for anything? Should have bought a boat with them already installed but it's to late for that..

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Wouldn't really want an old unit that sat for 10 years. The boat had only 7 hours on it and had been stored inside for 9 years. Just like new. Not sure if the gen or AC would have faired as well.

post-48500-0-47510900-1453146010_thumb.j

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Wow a 2005 with only 7 hours? Nice find.. Might want to look into portable AC units.. I had one in my 02 CL 242.. If it has shore power you can go that route. Can't help with the GEN though.

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Go with a small portable generator that you put down wind on the swim platform and a portable hatch a/c. Will cost less than two large herds.

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Generators scare me. Especially one sitting on the swim platform. I don't want to wake up dead...

brick

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Generators scare me. Especially one sitting on the swim platform. I don't want to wake up dead...

brick

Stay with your plans for a built in generator if you decide to add one, generally they are much quieter and when properly installed safer.

Boating culture where we boat frown at

portables, no one likes hearing them for extended period of time in the bay or cove. Most who have portables in our area tend to run them for short periods of time for showers, meal prep, and AC.

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Stay with your plans for a built in generator if you decide to add one, generally they are much quieter and when properly installed safer.

His bill just went from 2k to 10k and isn't really that much safer...I am interested in adding A/C too down the road. What Dennis A (the engineer :drool5: ) recommended was an r/v or hatch a/c hooked up to a portable generator on the swim platform. Obviously I'd have canvas up, multiple CO detectors, and be positioned so the boat can change position depending on the wind. Also, I'm not sure I'd use it while sleeping. The safest way to do a sleeping A/C is shore power or a truck load of 6v golf cart batteries.

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If this would be my boat, I would do it right, or wait until I can do it right. I would do it OEM way, or as close as possible using current equivalent models. Either install, genset or a/c, is involved and this is going to cost ... it's a BOAT after all.

I do not recall anybody here doing refit like this and doubt anybody here can really guide you in detail thru the process. The process needs to start with the evaluation of how your boat was built, what was already preinstalled, thruhulls, what harnesses were used, switches and breakers on power panel, etc. Then cross reference this with available part lists and electrical diagrams for your year/model boat available here and elsewhere. Keep in mind that not all boats are build the same way even within the same year/model.

If all this fails, you could find and work with a knowledgeable Chap dealer with long Chap experience. They will be able to evaluate and scope the project, locate the parts or equivalents, and price it all for you.

Sorry, could not be of more help.

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I've done several gen installs, and combined gen and air, and there are several considerations. Design is key as you are talking about 4 thru hull fittings minimum, with 2 being below the waterline. Generator raw water suction needs to be positioned well below the gen set raw water pump, so the net positive suction head pressure will keep the sea water strainer flooded. Also, if you plan to run the gen set while underway, the suction inlet position and orientation is critical. If turbulence is encountered here, the gen set will loose cooling water as soon as the boat gets on plane. Generator placement needs to provide for future maintenance access, and you will need another suction point from the fuel tank, with anti-siphon valve. If not available, and you tee off the existing engine feed then you run the risk of running your tank empty, as stand-alone generator suction dip tubes are purposely cut short so you maintain a get home fuel reserve. The exhaust hose must run downhill to the muffler, and that muffler unit takes us some real estate, and it's discharge must run uphill to the overboard discharge. Then there is the electrical feed to the power distribution panel, with a dock side to gen set transfer switch. This is critical as you never want to be back fed from shore power to the gen set. Ventilation is also an important design criteria as the generator coils need to breath and build as much excess heat as does the water cooled engine. Just because it will fit down in the hole, does not mean it can live there.

I did one AC install on a boat your size and it was not fun. I put a 7,500 BTU Cruise Aire system on a 27' Sea Ray Sundancer and located the condensing unit under the aft berth. Obviously, the condensate drain needed to go into the bilge as I was already below the water line. Make up water inlet and strainer are the same issues as the gen set water pump, with the exception of the raw water pump is NOT self priming, and needs to be flooded suction so that pump gets mounted low in the engine space. Discharge through the condensing unit should run uphill and continue that way through the unit and to the overboard discharge. By far, the hardest part of the install was the 4" duct hose discharge installation, as I went with both a mid-berth outlet, and a forward v-berth outlet. If you do decide to go this route, find a Sig with factory air and copy their design.

The cleanest install I ever did was my 1988 Sea Ray 300 Sundancer, as I went with a 10 KW Onan, and a Cruise Aire 12,000 BTU split system with remote condensing unit and two evaporators. With the compressor in the engine space, the unit was super quiet, and I even had an isolate-able outlet back at the aft bench seat that worked really well at night with the camper canvas up. The aft bench seat made up to a trundle bed, and it was my nest of choice. W

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Sorry Mr W ... how could I forget about your extensive experience.
On the other hand, I was not aware about your involved boatyard work, not just engines ... good to know.
Anyhow, glad you have posted the project outline and scope ... I did not even know where to start ...

page2_1.jpg ------ WATERLINE ------

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Sorry Mr W ... how could I forget about your extensive experience.

On the other hand, I was not aware about your involved boatyard work, not just engines ... good to know.

Anyhow, glad you have posted the project outline and scope ... I did not even know where to start ...

page2_1.jpg ------ WATERLINE ------

Step 1, measure water heater and see if Gen Set will fit there. Step two, remove starboard engine and remove water heater, then install Generator. Step three, re-install water heater under aft cabin berth. Not a huge deal if you have time and equipment and I'm all about doing it yourself, but I did want James to know what he was likely getting into. I'm glad I never paid a yard to do an install, and on a 26' Sig, I'm too old to fit in those spaces. Annapolis Cruise Aire are great people and ship direct to my home and when lightning hit the marina, they covered a very expensive 5 year old SMX controller under Warranty. I bought several complete systems from them. W

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Wanted to thank everyone for the input. I found an identical 260 with the factory genset and AC. Wouldn't touch it as far as purchasing the units because the boat is trashed but I did see where and how everything mounted. Mine has the breaker locations on the panel for the AC and I'll need to see what else I can find that compliments the gen and AC which may be pre-installed. I have friends (Suppliers) who can hook me up with both generators and air conditioning units once I figure out what I can do. Will cost my about half of retail for parts but not sure yet on the labor.

Thanks again

J

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Not sure about the install on the genset, but several years ago I installed Air on a 26' cruiser that I had. It really wasn't that hard to do. The hard part was getting the water line and power to the engine compartment. I was lucky that they had a conduit that was large enough to pull the hose and wire through. You will need some good hole saws to cut the vents holes and make sure when drilling through the bottom that it is not where a trailer bunk is. There is a great thing to get that will take care of the condensation. It is a Mermaid Condensator. The thing sucks the condensation out and it goes out with the output of the pump. Look it up and you will see how it works. If you don't use something like this then the condensation drain will go to the shower sump and on my 26 there wasn't a good way to run a drain line. Good luck with your project.

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