MonkeySeaII

More trailer woes

54 posts in this topic

Last week was our annual lake vacation.  This year we chose Smith Mountain Lake, VA.  Spent the week prior getting the boat ready, went thru the trailer checking bearings, bolts, tires, etc.  Last year we blew 1 Tow Master tire on the we home from NC.  We leave Friday night at 11 PM with plans to drive over night.  1 hour into the trip I blow the left front trailer tire.  Tire completely delaminated!  So back on the road in a jiffy and within 20 miles a 2nd tire blows on the right rear.  Same thing, totally delaminated.  At this point I'm out of spares so we get a hotel for the night.  Next morning I go to Jack Williams tire and have 4 new tires installed.  All tires are load range E, 225/75R15 so the tires are rated for 11,400 lbs.  Trailer is a 10K lb GVWR.  The tire tech told me the remaining "Tow Master" tire was ready to throw a belt too.  So they install "Super Cargo" tires that they say they have had good luck with.  So back on the road and 1 hour later another tire goes.  This one got punctured by a screw sticking out of the fender that was damaged by the previous blow out.  So at this point, I wasn't sure if I had a bad batch of Tow Master tires or if I have a problem with my trailer causing the tires to overheat.  So we left the boat at a repair center and went on vacation with no boat!  The trailer shop found no problem with the trailer!!  So now I'm going to start checking axle alignment and spindle alignment.  Ugh, what a crappy vacation!  I'm ready to sink this trailer and get a new one!!  And BTW, I paid extra for this custom Prestige Trailer that is very heavy duty!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate trailers. Have nothing but problems with them from bearings grease seals, fenders, bunks, etc. They never work right it seems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like maybe some expired tow master tires combined with some bad luck.  The very reason, i stopped towing and bought a lake home...way too many trailer issues over the years.  Endless flat tires from unavoidable road debris, a totaled trailer from a high speed, spare tire carrier failure incident to which the manufacturer admitted fault and ponied up.  Now my biggest issue is that I'm annoyed if when I press the button, the boat lift isn't lifting as fast as I think is should.  I hate trailering more than anything.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air pressure should be 80psi  Typical Load Range E specs 

Feature-rich, radial, special trailer tire provides excellent traction for a safe, smooth ride in both wet and dry conditions. Fits 15" wheels and has a maximum load capacity of 2,830 lbs at 80 Tire size: ST225/75R15 Section width: 8.9" Outer diameter (when inflated): 28.4" Capacity: Load range: E Ply rating: 10 Maximum load: 2,830 lbs at 80 psi Limited 2-year warranty 10303 Kenda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are the wheels/tires balanced?  I had some unbalanced tires on my trailer and on my way to Lake Norman (NC) last month, noticed in the mirror that the left front would jump up and down like a basketball between 61 and 63mph!  Huge vibration.  Couldn't feel it in the truck, torsion axles kept it isolated fairly decently to the one position on the trailer.  That kind of vibration will kill a tire.  I tried to keep it out of that speed range the entire 6 hour trip.  When I got there, inspected the tire and found all kind of damage to it.  Thankful it didn't croak on the trip.  Replaced for the ride home.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was a trailer boater for 20 yrs until 5 years ago and NEVER had a problem.  Now we only do our 1 trip per year to the South and then just the occasional trip back/forth to the lake at the beginning and end of season.  I'm anal about the maintenance and keeping the tires out of the sun.  But the last 3 years have been nothing but trouble.  2 failed axles replaced under warranty, 4 blown tires, dry rotted brake calipers, busted tongue jack, sticky brake reverse solenoid, etc.  I'm so sick of it!  I'm a nervous wreck now every time I pull this thing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Lightningtruck said:

Are the wheels/tires balanced?  I had some unbalanced tires on my trailer and on my way to Lake Norman (NC) last month, noticed in the mirror that the left front would jump up and down like a basketball between 61 and 63mph!  Huge vibration.  Couldn't feel it in the truck, torsion axles kept it isolated fairly decently to the one position on the trailer.  That kind of vibration will kill a tire.  I tried to keep it out of that speed range the entire 6 hour trip.  When I got there, inspected the tire and found all kind of damage to it.  Thankful it didn't croak on the trip.  Replaced for the ride home.

 

 

 

a lot of trailer tires an or wheels are not balanceable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the tires were balanced at some point.  But I don't see anything funky going on while towing.  I took some very rough measurements and there's a chance I may have a slight alignment problem.  That coupled with the tires being set at 73 psi rather than 80 could cause excessive heat possibly.  And maybe old, crappy tires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you guys running 80PSI because that's what it says on the tire?  (Just wondering)  Because that is at max load.  You should calculate the actual inflation requirements based on actual load not just run max PSI.

I only ask because I see this in the car world a lot.  People assume that what's on the sidewall is what you should run which is incorrect.  In your car and/or on your trailer you will have a sticker (unless it's been removed) that will show what PSI the "standard" tires should use.  For instance, my Truck's tires say 60PSI on the side (that is max)  I run 42-45 depending on load.  I even called the tire manufacture to confirm based on some issues I was having.

80PSI seems like a lot of PSI, but I also might not know what I'm talking about for larger boats/trailer tires.  Just figured I'd throw my .02 out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Lightningtruck said:

Interesting.  Hadn't ever heard that.  Do you know what the rationale is behind that?

Don't really know, just know the last boat I owned and put new tires on them and they said these trailer wheels were not balanceable and that many are like that.  My guess is between a trailer are no steering, occupant(the boat) not caring about chatter, and the few miles put on a boat trailer relative to a car, maybe it doesn't matter. 

 

Take a look at some boat trailer wheels and tires a launch sometime, very few youll find weights for balancing attached

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

everything I've read about trailer tires, including what the repair shop told me, is that you should run the tires at max psi.  80 in my case.  Running them below the max causes heat build up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, you sure can not catch a break with that trailer!  I don't blame you for wanting to dump it and get a new one.   I would guess the shop set the tires at 73psi cold so they would not exceed max psi when they warm up on the road.  My tires are rated at 50 max psi and I run 40 psi cold.   I have 7000lbs of axle under a 19ft boat, I'm border line needing a tandem axle setup, but I am glad to have the extra capacity the tandem provides.  You paid plenty for a heavy duty trailer just so you would not have to deal with these types of issues.  I hope you get it sorted out soon and back on the road without all the anxiety of towing a trailer you no longer trust. 

When I re-built my trailer I had the trailer in my shop up on stands fairly level.  When I was locating my axles I used a plumb bob to transfer critical points from the trailer to the floor to make measuring easier. You could pop chalk lines as well to give it more perspective.  This may be something to consider when you check your alignment. 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MonkeySeaII said:

everything I've read about trailer tires, including what the repair shop told me, is that you should run the tires at max psi.  80 in my case.  Running them below the max causes heat build up.

Googling around, it seems that for ST tires, that is the recommendation.  Go with max PSI.  That's interesting.  My signature Boat/Trailer has been on two 1200 mile trips w/o issue, and I do no have them at max PSI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, dmtalon said:

Googling around, it seems that for ST tires, that is the recommendation.  Go with max PSI.  That's interesting.  My signature Boat/Trailer has been on two 1200 mile trips w/o issue, and I do no have them at max PSI.

I had 5 good years with this trailer.  Went to NC 4 of those years and never had any issues.  Then suddenly the problems started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The maximum pressure all the time ?

What happens to the tire wear if towed 333 mile with no load ?  Tires would be riding on the very center treads only ? Heating  & wear out ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I switched to the maxxis radials and had them balanced the hubs and tires run cooler so much better than the bias ply

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, drewm3i said:

I hate trailers. Have nothing but problems with them from bearings grease seals, fenders, bunks, etc. They never work right it seems.

Knock on wood, no trailer problems ever after almost 12 seasons and 21,000 trailer miles. Never a trailer problem on 3 previous Chaparral boats...

brick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cyclops2 said:

The maximum pressure all the time ?

What happens to the tire wear if towed 333 mile with no load ?  Tires would be riding on the very center treads only ? Heating  & wear out ?

You would not see any wear after 333 miles unless something was mis-aligned. I replaced all trailer tires this spring, as they were 5 years old. No tread wear after 10,000+ miles...

brick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MonkeySeaII said:

I had 5 good years with this trailer.  Went to NC 4 of those years and never had any issues.  Then suddenly the problems started.

Trailer tires should be replaced at 5 years. It is age, not mileage. 

brick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was all psyched to take my boat out of the area for the first time now that I have my F150. After reading this thread, I've gone from excitement to nervous.

I myself have had two failed tires back in the beginning of ownership. Knowing what I know now, I'd say the tires were old and due to fail. The first failure I changed myself but learned that if I hadn't noticed it, the tire behind it would have been cut by the fender. The suspension cannot hold the trailer above the good tire. We pulled off the road before that happened.

The second occurrence happed while we were out in the lake. We got back and the tire was flat. The lug nuts wouldn't budge. Broke several tools trying to get them loose. Had to call the trailer guys who sent someone out and they were able to get it off.

My concern is that when I enter into Canada, the phone is dead and I'm traveling on my own. Adds to the stress. QEW to Mississauga to launch then 8nm to Toronto Island.  I actually thought of crossing Lake Ontario from the Niagara River but I am not familiar with Lake Ontario's habits like I am with Lake Erie. Plus, in a worst case scenario, if a storm comes through, I can hug the western shore of Lake Ontario and stay in calm waters going back to the marina.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, RoyR said:

All these trailer tires are $hit, especially LoadStar / Carlisle....I use the Maxxis M8008 and have had no problems with tire wear, blowouts etc.

http://www.maxxis.com/tires/autolt/trailer

Have the new Carlisle tires and love them.  Replaced GoodYear Marathons with them.  Zero issues with them after 5 years and a lot of highway miles. 

 

Low tire pressure builds heat, dry rotted side walls and hot roads are a bad combo for tire Delamination.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, SST said:

I was all psyched to take my boat out of the area for the first time now that I have my F150. After reading this thread, I've gone from excitement to nervous.

I myself have had two failed tires back in the beginning of ownership. Knowing what I know now, I'd say the tires were old and due to fail. The first failure I changed myself but learned that if I hadn't noticed it, the tire behind it would have been cut by the fender. The suspension cannot hold the trailer above the good tire. We pulled off the road before that happened.

The second occurrence happed while we were out in the lake. We got back and the tire was flat. The lug nuts wouldn't budge. Broke several tools trying to get them loose. Had to call the trailer guys who sent someone out and they were able to get it off.

My concern is that when I enter into Canada, the phone is dead and I'm traveling on my own. Adds to the stress. QEW to Mississauga to launch then 8nm to Toronto Island.  I actually thought of crossing Lake Ontario from the Niagara River but I am not familiar with Lake Ontario's habits like I am with Lake Erie. Plus, in a worst case scenario, if a storm comes through, I can hug the western shore of Lake Ontario and stay in calm waters going back to the marina.

Inspect your tires for cracking and signs of dry Rot.... Both sides. Torque lugs, set air pressure, lube bearings if you haven't lately and go enjoy.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 5 years on my GY Marathons, LRD.  I replaced them with LRE Tow Master tires.  All 4 Tow Master tires blew and delaminated.  I just put 4 Super Cargo LRE tires on and the date codes are 2016.  I also bought 2 Carlise tires for spares, 2016 date as well.  Some things I know:  the Tow Masters were inflated to around 73 psi as I checked them all prior to traveling.  The temperature was in the mid 90s last week when I traveled.  I found last night that 1 trailing arm on the the front axle is set 2 degrees higher than the other 3.  This would contribute to increased weight on the other 3 tires.  I also suspect these tires were old inventory when I got them and were probably over 5 yrs old.  I also don't think my brakes are balanced as I was seeing only 1 wheel smoke a bit on steep hills.  Thinking that one is doing more work than the rest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now