MonkeySeaII

More trailer woes

54 posts in this topic

16 hours ago, Brian S said:

Inspect your tires for cracking and signs of dry Rot.... Both sides. Torque lugs, set air pressure, lube bearings if you haven't lately and go enjoy.  

exactly. Things happen, but more times than not issue arise due to poor maint by the current owner or previous owner.  Proper air, bearings lubed,  boat sitting right on trailer, and hitch height set right as you see a lot of boats riding high or low.  put the boat on the truck and get a level out, move hitch up and down until you are level, although most people use those $15 jobs from walmart to tow.  You also see people driving way to fast for trailer tires, backing up over things or running over things.  In general I think people neglect the trailer and drive when towing like they normally would which result sin greater failures.

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Purchase new tires frequently, even the spare.

Run them at max PSI.

Cover the tires if possible when stored outside.

Always be prepared for a blowout or flat, carry a jack, blocking, tire tools and a spare or two.

Put a little antisieze on your lug bolts to make removal easier.

Say a prayer prior to departure!

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4 hours ago, Chap243 said:

Purchase new tires frequently, even the spare.

Run them at max PSI.

Cover the if possible when stored outside.

Always be prepared for a blowout or flat, carry a jack, blocking, tire tools and a spare or two.

Put a little antisieze on your lug bolts to make removal easier.

Say a prayer prior to departure!

I always say a prayer prior to departure with an invitation to ride along. Positive Space-Non Rev Corporate.

I took a small run today and launched at a different spot. I have always thought it was a permit only ramp but it wasn't. Isle View Park. Easy in and out. But if a cruiser goes by your screwed. No protection.

I took the boat up into Canada a little bit on the Wellend River. Sprint says my phone will work when I enter Canada. The phone never switched to "Roger" and stayed Sprint. The signal was so weak it kept disconnecting. Texting worked but it was slow to "transmit." That's my real paranoia, not being able to contact somebody if something happens. Worst case is I just sit there and wait for someone to stop.

Wish me luck as I'm headed to Toronto tomorrow [Wednesday]. It's gonna be hot on the road and the beach.

I'm really excited about this because since I've had the boat, I've always wanted to trailer the boat somewhere but would never really trust the Bronco to leave the area. With the F150, I'm confident it will get me anywhere I want to go. Toronto is the first step "out the door."

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4 hours ago, Chaparral Rider said:

Someone correct me if i'm misremembering but ST tires have a 65mph speed rating on them as well.  

ST doesn't define the speed rating. From etrailer.com

 

Speed Rating of ST Tires

Special trailer tires have a maximum speed rating, just like passenger car and truck tires. Older tires have no special marking to designate a limit. Their maximum speed is 65 mph. Newer tires, those manufactured in 2015 and later, should have one of the following codes on the sidewall to show their rating:

 

  • M - 81 mph
  • L - 75 mph
  • J - 62 mph

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Monkey, sorry about the hassles, that really sucks.

I'm preparing for our annual long distance haul to Lake George next week and want to prep the trailer properly.

Current trailer is a Vanguard with Safe-T-Lube bearing set-up.  Anybody have a preference of what grease to use?

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 Does everyone know that trailer tires of all types are the LEAST QUALITY you can buy ?

Compared to steel belted radial car tires ?   

If trailer tires were at least equal ?

You could always put them on passenger cars with people in them doing 75 mph for hours.

Trailer tires.        Were, are & always will be crap compared to car tires.  When you accept that fact & put on car tires derated by 10% of capacity. They will last as long & as safely as a car tire.          Keep paying more money for tires that blow out needlessly.

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58 minutes ago, Toddavid said:

Monkey, sorry about the hassles, that really sucks.

I'm preparing for our annual long distance haul to Lake George next week and want to prep the trailer properly.

Current trailer is a Vanguard with Safe-T-Lube bearing set-up.  Anybody have a preference of what grease to use?

Mobil-1 HP synthetic high performance grease of course. Can't believe you had to ask.  Ha...   W

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I was always under the impression passenger car tires would not be suitable for trailer use as ST tires are constructed differently with thicker side walls  to reduce flexing .I think the key is finding a quality trailer tire as for the speed restriction on trailer tires 65mph is fast enough with a trailer behind you .I think a lot of trailer tire horror stories are due to neglect  they need to have the air pressure checked regularly  because of the thicker side wall they wont look low but may be 20psi down and as a lot have already said after 5 years replace them they may have good tread but from sitting and sun they are no good

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12 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

Mobil-1 HP synthetic high performance grease of course. Can't believe you had to ask.  Ha...   W

Right, of course.  

If the previous grease was conventional lithium based, any special procedure switching over to synthetic?  Just push and purge out the old stuff or disassemble and solvent clean the bearings and races?

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36 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

Mobil-1 HP synthetic high performance grease of course. Can't believe you had to ask.  Ha...   W

Good stuff.  That's all I use.  Have the ez lube hubs. Pump till its pink again and good to go.  Can get out of truck after hours on road and hold onto the hubs. 

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27 minutes ago, Toddavid said:

Right, of course.  

If the previous grease was conventional lithium based, any special procedure switching over to synthetic?  Just push and purge out the old stuff or disassemble and solvent clean the bearings and races?

No need to solvent clean, in fact most recommend against it especially when a non-evaporative solvent like Safety Kleen is used and not properly air dried. Brake kleen, lacquer thinner or something that leaves no residual is best. Wipe off the old grease with a lint free rag, and re-pack the bearings after careful inspection. With that lube and your auto feeders that will be the last time you will need to think about bearings.  W

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4 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

No need to solvent clean, in fact most recommend against it especially when a non-evaporative solvent like Safety Kleen is used and not properly air dried. Brake kleen, lacquer thinner or something that leaves no residual is best. Wipe off the old grease with a lint free rag, and re-pack the bearings after careful inspection. With that lube and your auto feeders that will be the last time you will need to think about bearings.  W

What do you think of the new Vortex hubs? I have one out of the four on my trailer (see other thread of trailering woes). It was actually cool to the touch after hours of towing. I'm thinking of changing out the other three hubs and bearings with the Vortex. 

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37 minutes ago, TimBrown said:

What do you think of the new Vortex hubs? I have one out of the four on my trailer (see other thread of trailering woes). It was actually cool to the touch after hours of towing. I'm thinking of changing out the other three hubs and bearings with the Vortex. 

The old oil filled hubs as offered by Tie Down Engineering and sold as Turbo-Lube were nice as a quick glance through the clear Lexan cover confirmed both proper oil level and an absence of water infiltration at a glance. That said and there is no better lubricant for a bearing than oil, period. Tie Down then started to offer retrofit kits to change over from conventional and the hubs were not threaded as were the factory OEM Turbo-Lubes covers and they leaked. Now Lucus Oil is distributing the new Tie Down design Vortex hubs which inject grease into the bearing cavity, dispelling the spent grease. Good in theory but I have no experience with these. As long as the expelled grease cannot get on the brake linings I'm good with it. Anything that helps keep a slight positive pressure on the grease void to discourage water from coming in gets my vote.  Gotta be better than the old Bearing Buddy.  W

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the real frustrating part is I can't find a "smoking gun".  I put the trailer on jack stands and removed all 4 wheels.  I measured distance from the ball to each axle on both sides and compared.  Also measured distance between both axles on each side. They are within 1/8".  I laid a straight edge across the tires on the same side and the max 1 tire is out is 1/8"  The only thing I found out of spec is one trailing arm is ~8 degrees off from the rest.  The spec says they should all be within 6 degrees of eachother.  So I'm adjusting them so they're all in spec.  But I can't see this causing the problems.  I also see that the brakes are dragging on 1 or 2 of the rotors so that'll need to be adjusted.  But again, I don't see that causing the problem.  Ugh!

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On August 1, 2016 at 11:21 AM, MonkeySeaII said:

So they install "Super Cargo" tires that they say they have had good luck with.  So back on the road and 1 hour later another tire goes.  This one got punctured by a screw sticking out of the fender that was damaged by the previous blow out.  So at this point, I wasn't sure if I had a bad batch of Tow Master tires or if I have a problem with my trailer causing the tires to overheat....The trailer shop found no problem with the trailer!!  

IMO, Seems to me that you have answered your own question by validating your trailer set up thru measuring.  Trailer shop found nothing wrong as well.  Get rid of the screw and any other sharp objects, slap another tire on and get back to boating. 

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Don't forget just because you by new trailer tires doesn't mean they are not old and outdated. You should always check the manufacture date of the tire which is on everyone at the end of the DOT Id number. Look at the last 4 numbers, the first 2 are the week they were manufactured and the last 2 are the year. I believe that tires that are older than 4 years are not sellable but always seem to find there way onto someone's ride.

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Assuming you have disc brakes, try gravity flushing brake fluid. Put trailer on hill with ball at the top. Open bleeders one at a time until all fluid goes through. Use only a sealed container of DOT 4 fluid (not DOT 5). Could have a little air in calipers. Is the wheel that's smoking closest to surge master cylinder? I had issued with previous trailer. Trailer alignment is a nightmare! Very hard to get correct even though it seems like it should be easy! Good luck

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knock on wood for me.  Never had a problem trailering with the 3 boats I've owned.  12 years so far with the chaps...

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Just because it is a trailer woes story, my very first ever blow out with my previous Chap due to a 2x4 with nails sticking out of it on the road taught me that my SUV lug wrench isn't the same size as the trailer lugs.  I had to actually use my road side assistance just to get the trailer wheel off.  I now always carry a breaker bar with an air socket which is stronger than the shiny metal version plus a t bar wrench with 4 sizes just in case as well.  

When spring comes and the low intelligence folks hook their non-road worthy trailers up to their vehicles and do their towing up to the northern part of the state, there is a lot of debris on the roads.  Last season a 1970's winnebago towing an equally old wooden trailer in front of us had the trailer literally disintegrate while towing it.  Debris covered the whole road like a small explosion took it out.      

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On ‎8‎/‎1‎/‎2016 at 5:58 PM, Brian S said:

Inspect your tires for cracking and signs of dry Rot.... Both sides. Torque lugs, set air pressure, lube bearings if you haven't lately and go enjoy.  

I did just that. The oldest tire is 2013. No cracks anyware. Lubed everything up and off I went. The only thing that happened was I lost the buddy bearing......AGAIN!  I hate those things.

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