JeffL

Beaching

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So we are brand new to power boats and just bought a 2016 21' H2O Sport and loving it.  We live 5 minutes from a boat launch on the Connecticut River and there are several nice sand bars along the way. (believe it our not but the Connecticut River has some beautiful sections south of Hartford) This past weekend I got up the nerve to pull up to one so we could enjoy the day.  Coasted into about 2' of water with the drive up, hopped out and set the anchor. No issues at all and we had a blast.  But I have to admit I was really nervous while there.  Worried the tide would go out and I'd end up stuck, wake waves sending us into another boat, the boat drifting too far out, etc.

Any suggestions, advice or things to look out for?  Or am I just being a nervous nelly?

 

Thanks!

 

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I'm too anal to beach my boat.  I don't want to scratch the keel.  What I used to do was back the boat in shallow enough that we could swim in, set my bow anchor, then take my 2nd anchor from the stern to the beach.  It would keep the boat from swinging, and waves coming in wouldn't come over the stern as the bow was pointed out.  Always worked well.

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There is only a couple of places I beach the boat and the sand is very soft with no rocks in it.  Otherwise I will anchor out and we walk in to the beach area.  Sometimes the kids prefer that so they can jump off bow.  Like MonkeySeall we use two anchors to prevent the swinging and works very well.  I will say this I bought a box anchor this year and will never use the Danforth anchor that came with the boat again.

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I passed on an immaculate 256 a few years ago that had repeatedly been beached in the Ohio river. The keel`s gelcoat was ground down to the fibers underneath. I couldn`t imagine having such a beautiful boat above the waterline, but a trashed keel. I know some who beach regularly that will carry a piece of outdoor carpet to put down on the sand/rocks then run the boat up on the carpet for extra protection. I personally have never beached my boat.

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16 minutes ago, Chap243 said:

I passed on an immaculate 256 a few years ago that had repeatedly been beached in the Ohio river. The keel`s gelcoat was ground down to the fibers underneath. I couldn`t imagine having such a beautiful boat above the waterline, but a trashed keel. I know some who beach regularly that will carry a piece of outdoor carpet to put down on the sand/rocks then run the boat up on the carpet for extra protection. I personally have never beached my boat.

You do realize how easy it is to fix that, right?

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Like others have said, back up to beach bow anchor out and then set stern anchor on beach, outdrives in up position. We can then stand behind swim platform and use it as a table. Hull does not come in contact with beach. 

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We don't beach. Just motor in to where we can stand. Then put the drive up and walk it in shallower. We do not beach it though. It is always in at least a two feet of water. Don't want to ruin the hull. I know it can be fixed but why fix if you can avoid?

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I didn't actually run it up into the sand (sorry I wasn't clear.  I should have realize "beaching" means running onto the beach! :)).  I left it in about 2' of water.  Has anyone stranded their boat on the sand from the tide going out?  There is almost a 3' tide influence in this area.

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I am starting to feel a bit silly actually.  I am the only one who will not beach their boat at the main sandbar on our lake.  People with far more expensive boats than mine speed up and jam the bow onto the rock laden sand. The sand has a lot of rocks in it but literally nobody but me seems to care. Beautiful brand new Cobalts, rammed up onto the rock sand without a care in the world.  My kids are always yelling at me because we have to go off to the side and double anchor it instead.  

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8 minutes ago, Chaparral Rider said:

I am starting to feel a bit silly actually.  I am the only one who will not beach their boat at the main sandbar on our lake.  People with far more expensive boats than mine speed up and jam the bow onto the rock laden sand. The sand has a lot of rocks in it but literally nobody but me seems to care. Beautiful brand new Cobalts, rammed up onto the rock sand without a care in the world.  My kids are always yelling at me because we have to go off to the side and double anchor it instead.  

Don't feel silly.  I don't either. Have walked it in far enough to get MIL onto frt ladder but it's not going to get blasted by the rocks.  Will wave as I drive by if I have to. It takes enough of a beating with all the debris in the water while cruising around.  

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4 hours ago, JeffL said:

So we are brand new to power boats and just bought a 2016 21' H2O Sport and loving it.  We live 5 minutes from a boat launch on the Connecticut River and there are several nice sand bars along the way. (believe it our not but the Connecticut River has some beautiful sections south of Hartford) This past weekend I got up the nerve to pull up to one so we could enjoy the day.  Coasted into about 2' of water with the drive up, hopped out and set the anchor. No issues at all and we had a blast.  But I have to admit I was really nervous while there.  Worried the tide would go out and I'd end up stuck, wake waves sending us into another boat, the boat drifting too far out, etc.

Any suggestions, advice or things to look out for?  Or am I just being a nervous nelly?

 

Thanks!

 

You can install a Keel Guard. A piece of rubber glued to the keel. BUT, by beaching the boat you run the risk of sucking up sand and scoring the impeller housing and running the impeller. Plus as you mentioned, the tides. Personal, I would not do it but thats me.........   

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Just remember that many people use a single anchor. If you double anchor ?  Allow for them swinging into you with wind or tide changes.

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On August 30, 2016 at 0:19 PM, Chaparral Rider said:

I am starting to feel a bit silly actually.  I am the only one who will not beach their boat at the main sandbar on our lake.  People with far more expensive boats than mine speed up and jam the bow onto the rock laden sand. The sand has a lot of rocks in it but literally nobody but me seems to care. Beautiful brand new Cobalts, rammed up onto the rock sand without a care in the world.  My kids are always yelling at me because we have to go off to the side and double anchor it instead.  

I have never beached my boat. 

brick

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Walking it in and using two anchors gets the boat exactly where you want it. I have at times gone back out and adjusted for the tide. 

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It really depends on your area. We beach all the time on the river. If you look at the bottom of my boat you would never know it. The sand along the edge of the bank is like gravy,  thick river sludge. Further up the banks where it is sun baked it is a fine powder. If we would anchor out and try to walk to shore we would sink almost knee deep in the muck below the surface. All of beaches are made by the COE dredgers, all silt pulled up from the river bottom.

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IMO nothing wrong with tilting up and dragging it into 2 ft of water. But I'm on a lake. Just be wary of the time and tide

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You should enjoy the boat !! If beaching is where you are happy ?  Learn how to do it correctly. No harm will be done.

Not sure? get a really good BEACHER to show you the way to do your beach bottoms. 

Beaching to most of us does not mean pushing the boat into the bottom so people keep their feet & deck shoes dry.   If needed for handicapped people? A small inflatable & oars is perfect for moving them back & forth.

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On 8/30/2016 at 7:57 AM, JeffL said:

 But I have to admit I was really nervous while there.  Worried the tide would go out

I'd suggest consulting a tide chart and act accordingly.  You won't be worried about the tide going out if you know when it's going to happen.

For example, if you are anchoring at low tide, 2ft of water might be ok if you're going to be there for a while.  If you're anchoring at high tide, I'd be looking for more than 2 ft,  3 - 4, maybe.  You also have to have an understanding of how much water you generally gain or lose between low and high tide. 

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I don't beach my current boat, because years ago I did with a previous boat and left it overnight on the beach.  I was so regretfull when I pulled the boat out.  The sand on the beach with the lake chop wave action rubbed the gel coat clean off to the fiberglass!  My dad was super PO'd at me.  It was his boat.  Lesson learned. I now leave a layer of water between land and the hull.

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I will never beach my boat as we go there to swim boat is always in 3 to 4 feet of water . I use 1 anchor off bow and one sand spike off the back prevents the swing I have seen a guy use a hand ice fishing auger in the sand works nice doesn't move a bit 

Google sand spike or beach spike or sand anchor or beach anchor  there on ebay to 

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