clydito

Winterize in Lake Arrowhead

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Just bought my first boat, a 2003 Sunesta 210. Plan to store it my garage in Lake Arrowhead. Garage is not heated, but house is only 12 years old so pretty well insulated. Coldest winter temps around 30F.

Do I need to winterize the boat?

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Winterization is a miss-leading term we throw around, but the process done properly goes well beyond freeze protection. Changing the engine oil at season's end gets rid of all the acids created by the byproducts of combustion that form when moisture accumulates in the oil during extended storage at low temperatures. Changing the out drive oil in the fall will alert you to a problem if a seal and/or bearing has failed, and gives you the entire winter to get it fixed. Fogging the engine coats the raw metal internal surfaces with an oil film, and on a MPFI engine, it treats the fuel pumps and injectors for lay-up. On a raw water cooled engine it's a good practice to drain the block and flush with fresh water to purge the silt and sediment from the bottom of the engine's cylinder cooling water jackets. Once a season keeps them pretty clean, and as long as you are doing it, adding some Marine/RV antifreeze to the block adds both piece of mind and rust inhibitors, and for 4 bucks a gallon why the heck not.  W

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59 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

Winterization is a miss-leading term we throw around, but the process done properly goes well beyond freeze protection. Changing the engine oil at season's end gets rid of all the acids created by the byproducts of combustion that form when moisture accumulates in the oil during extended storage at low temperatures. Changing the out drive oil in the fall will alert you to a problem if a seal and/or bearing has failed, and gives you the entire winter to get it fixed. Fogging the engine coats the raw metal internal surfaces with an oil film, and on a MPFI engine, it treats the fuel pumps and injectors for lay-up. On a raw water cooled engine it's a good practice to drain the block and flush with fresh water to purge the silt and sediment from the bottom of the engine's cylinder cooling water jackets. Once a season keeps them pretty clean, and as long as you are doing it, adding some Marine/RV antifreeze to the block adds both piece of mind and rust inhibitors, and for 4 bucks a gallon why the heck not.  W

+1

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