Jump to content

Corroded Lug Nuts


Recommended Posts

The lug nuts on my used trailer are so corroded I had to jump on the breaker bar to get them to move.  Then it took an hour to get them all the way off of just one wheel.  Even getting new ones on is hard labor.  How do you keep lug nuts from getting corroded in salt water?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you get the old ones off, take a wire wheel on a drill motor and clean the lug studs good.  Get a tube of anti-seize  and apply some to each stud before installing the new lug nuts.  If the studs are in really bad shape, consider replacing those as well.  If you just purchased the 'used' trailer, I would do a full PM front to back and get the trailer road worthy and reliable. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anti-seize is your friend.  I like to use the stick form for wheel studs, its less messy.  If your lug nuts don't go back on smoothly though, you really should replace the stud, and nut.  you have no way of knowing if they're tight enough, or too tight for that matter.  Having a wheel come off, with all your studs sheared off, would sure ruin a trip out on the boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I can be patient on very tight nuts & bolts. I re soak with a Q Tip every day for usually about up to 3 days. Never took longer. I do the slightly tighten & loosen way. Only lost a couple in 79 years.   Some have a HARD SETTING thread locking compound that can feel like rust. a flame for 5 to 10 seconds will always loosen the compound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 on PB blaster and time.

I keep a 3 gallon garden sprayer in the bed of my truck. All my launches are in saltwater so after I dunk the boat and park the trailer, I rinse the trailer. The garden sprayer has a high concentrate mix of Salt-Away in it. It only takes a minute or two to get the brakes, wheels, axles and springs. There's no reason to dunk the trailer in salt water then let it sit in the sun rotting all day while you have fun on the boat. I do this religiously after having to replace a broken leaf spring. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2017 at 5:58 AM, TNBrett said:

Anti-seize is your friend.  I like to use the stick form for wheel studs, its less messy.  If your lug nuts don't go back on smoothly though, you really should replace the stud, and nut.  you have no way of knowing if they're tight enough, or too tight for that matter.  Having a wheel come off, with all your studs sheared off, would sure ruin a trip out on the boat.

+100, I don't use rusted studs. Too easy to replace them and way too dangerous and unpredictable. 

Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...