Auggie

Boat retrieval

26 posts in this topic

I've never had a boat this big and have only been out in it once. I dunked the entire trailer but kept my tow vehicle dry when retrieving it.  I was told it's better to keep more of the trailer out of the water and POWER the boat onto the trailer.  That just sounds wrong to me but I need to know if it would be better to do it that way.  Opinions would be greatly appreciated.  

Auggie

 

It's a 91' 2750sx (27'10")

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The lake I am on does not allow power loading so the only choice is to get the trailer in deep to limit the amount of winch time.  I try to get it to float as far forward as I can before winching the last few feet.  This requires getting the truck in to the point of the exhaust being under water which is never a comfortable feeling!  Have not had any issues over the last 8 seasons.  Wish they would let us power load, makes life a lot easier.  I am sure someone else here can help you with power loading tricks.........

Lew

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Every lake and ramp are going to be different, dependent on ramp angle and water level. I like getting my trailer well in the water when loading and unloading. I usually know that when my trailer fenders are covered that I am good. Getting the trailer well in the water will wear less the boat bottom and trailer bunks. I usually power up the last couple feet to the winch post so the strap can be attached.

Your probably just going to have to play around with your retrieval setting until you find your boat and trailers "sweet spot".

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You want your back tires just forward of the water line, power loading or winching or both.

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Doesn't seem to matter which ramp I use, the boat loads better if the top of the forward fender is just above the water line. If in too far, the boat can move side to side depending on wind and wave action. I have powered the boat onto the trailer a few times when necessary but prefer to winch.

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Finally went out again yesterday.  (Our 2nd time),  no power loading, just dunked and winched the last few inches and all went well. Thanks for the replies. Thanks,  as long as this is working well keep doing this,

 Auggie

rps20170519_142637_372.jpg

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Is it a huge deal of the boat isn't centered perfectly on the trailer?  I mean off by about 3-4 inches one way or the other?

Until recently when I took my mother in law (of course) I never really even looked to see if it was centered. I just pulled up as far as I could and then winched it the rest of the way and called it a day but of course this time she was walking up behind the boat and says "hey it's not centered" so we back it down and try it again and it takes 3 more times before I get off the boat to look myself and this time it's off by about 2 inches so I said screw it that's fine.  She says it was off much more than that previous times. 

 

 

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Some boats will center themselves on the trailer as you Bebop down the road.

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We power and winch. Usually the trailer is in far enough just to see the top of the front of the fender. I power the boat up to within 3 feet of the winch, cut the engine and raise the outdrive, then winch it the last 3 feet as the Admiral backs the tow vehicle further down, if needed.

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On ‎5‎/‎18‎/‎2017 at 4:47 PM, drewm3i said:

You want your back tires just forward of the water line, power loading or winching or both.

I wish it were always this black and white.  It isn't.

Different ramps will dictate different depths for your trailer.  Water depth, ramp steepness, camber will affect your trailer, truck depth.  As you're learning, you'll get a feel for it over time...

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59 minutes ago, Futzin' said:

I wish it were always this black and white.  It isn't.

Different ramps will dictate different depths for your trailer.  Water depth, ramp steepness, camber will affect your trailer, truck depth.  As you're learning, you'll get a feel for it over time...

+1. Each ramp on our lake is different. On one I don't even get my feet wet standing by the winch because the ramp is so steep and on another I have to get the truck in to almost the drivers door to float the boat off. 

I have found that on MINE if I keep about two inches of the very front of the forward most bunk dry it seems to work out just fine. On some ramps that puts the fenders well underwater and on others the fenders are not all the way under. Depends on how steep the ramp is.

Joe

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Agree with the last two posts. The ramp we use at Table Rock is a 75 degree angle. OK, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but it is much steeper than our river ramps and we have to adjust accordingly.

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1 hour ago, Futzin' said:

I wish it were always this black and white.  It isn't.

Different ramps will dictate different depths for your trailer.  Water depth, ramp steepness, camber will affect your trailer, truck depth.  As you're learning, you'll get a feel for it over time...

Ours are all built about the same steepness. Either way, all the way in helps retrieve bigger boats I have found. That said, I'd never put my back tires in the water. That's just asking for trouble IMO.

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On ‎5‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 10:49 PM, drewm3i said:

Ours are all built about the same steepness. Either way, all the way in helps retrieve bigger boats I have found. That said, I'd never put my back tires in the water. That's just asking for trouble IMO.

I would NEVER get mine loaded without putting the trailer in up to and sometimes over the fenders. 

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Saltwater is   ALMOST ALWAYS A NO NO to put tow vehicle METAL PARTS in the saltwater.

We all drive in freshwater rain right ?  Any problems ?

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I have always dunked my trailers so the fenders just go under the water.  Then I power the boat up and winch as little as possible.  I've actually snapped a winch strap trying to winch it too much.  But if I sink it too much, it's harder to get the boat centered right.

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3 hours ago, PY said:

I would NEVER get mine loaded without putting the trailer in up to and sometimes over the fenders. 

Understood, I'm talking about the truck tires. My trailer is pretty much fully submerged.

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I am the fastes guy on the trailer in high wind & river currents.         How can that be you old fart?

My trailers have 4 guide on poles that clear the boat by inches.     Piece of cake by myself. Leave it idling in forward to winch tight. Key off. Gone from ramp. Took 40 years to do it.

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I have a 9' beam and adding the guide posts isn't an option.  CHP already looks at us a bit and even if its legal I'd  rather do without more attention.  

We did take the boat out again since I first asked the question (actually 2X now) and posted this thread and we did the same thing it was pretty windy when docking but it wasn't too bad retrieving the boat. I keep the Excursions rear tires about a foot away from the water and completely dunk the trailer.  This seems to be working out so we'll stick to it at this ramp. 

Thank you all for the replies and info. 

Auggie

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On 5/19/2017 at 5:31 PM, Futzin' said:

Some boats will center themselves on the trailer as you Bebop down the road.

Is that an official term?  "Bebop down the road..."  :P

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...not exactly... :P

I thought it was pretty common, though; perhaps not.  :mellow:

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Just now, Futzin' said:

...not exactly... :P

I thought it was pretty common, though; perhaps not.  :mellow:

Well I like it and plan on plagiarizing it!! :) 

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I agree, with my old trailer, it had 3 sets of bunks so it could be tricky to get the boat centered with a side wind.  One strake would sit up on the bunk as they were perfectly set at the edges of the strakes.  Once or twice I'd say F it and just "be bop down the road" and let it fall into place.

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I do that with the 16' Aluminum boat all the time.

Rickie Nelson singing.    "Bee Bop Baby"     in the car.      :)

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On 05/19/2017 at 9:09 PM, tomnjo said:

We power and winch. Usually the trailer is in far enough just to see the top of the front of the fender. I power the boat up to within 3 feet of the winch, cut the engine and raise the outdrive, then winch it the last 3 feet as the Admiral backs the tow vehicle further down, if needed.

This. I determined this method works the best. Maybe not for all boats, but a 21 to 23 foot will load using this method.

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