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BRUCE J BEEGAL

Batteries loosing water

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I have 2 batteries in my 2003 chaparral 240 signture and I had  the boat plug into shore power  with the battery charger on for about 5 weeks, when i got the boat fixed the engine started fine because it was plug in, when i went out on the river and shut the engine off and put the switch on the house battery  i was able to use the radio and lights but when i tried to start the engine it just clicked. When i went to look at the batteries there was a little bit of water in them, so i put distille water in both batteries and put them on a slow charge and I am hoping they come back any thoughts. 

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How old were the batteries? If the plates were above the water level, you will need to replace the batteries. 

brick

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Is sounds like the charger did not go into a standby mode. So they overcharged and the water boiled off. Is the charger set to the right battery type? Is it a 3 or 4 stage charger? Better still, you are using a marine battery charger and not a car one?

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8 hours ago, Iggy said:

Is sounds like the charger did not go into a standby mode. So they overcharged and the water boiled off. Is the charger set to the right battery type? Is it a 3 or 4 stage charger? Better still, you are using a marine battery charger and not a car one?

^^^ What type of charger / how old / likely not functioning correctly.

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They ARE TOTALY & FOREVER RUINED.

Replace

That battery charger or you are suspect for cooked batteries.

Have you ALWAYS CHECKED BATTERY WATER LEVELS ?  ALWAYS added water BEFORE THE WATER DROPPED BELOW tops of battery plates ?

Batteries can / DO DEMAND ATTENTION.

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There is a good possibility that the batteries had weak cells and this would cause the charger to over charge and boil the water out of them. Like has been said, once the plates have been exposed it is time for new batteries. You might want to consider glass mat type batteries. I have gone to glass mat type in my boat because I can not keep up with battery maintenance. 

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Good engine starting batters should never be on constant charge only house batteries.The reason is your experiance with dead engine batteries

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1 minute ago, Bt Doctur said:

Good engine starting batters should never be on constant charge only house batteries.The reason is your experiance with dead engine batteries

Disagree. A quality multi-stage onboard charger will charge and then maintain a battery - starting or deep cycle - at the correct level. 

brick

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Nope, there is no good reason to constant charge engine batteries. They are charged by the engines charging system. When a battery does start to go bad you get a weak/dead battery condition and thats when you change the battery ,Keeping it on constant charge can boil the batteries dry and you get a no start condition.

Do you keep your car plugged in when you go on vacation?

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1 hour ago, Bt Doctur said:

Nope, there is no good reason to constant charge engine batteries. They are charged by the engines charging system. When a battery does start to go bad you get a weak/dead battery condition and thats when you change the battery ,Keeping it on constant charge can boil the batteries dry and you get a no start condition.

Do you keep your car plugged in when you go on vacation?

Unfortunately, I don't get to run my boat daily. The onboard charger on my boat maintains, and does not overcharge the batteries.  It keeps the batteries fully charged, even with constant drains such as the radio memory and  mercathode system, which are a constant draw on the battery. 

My daily driver does not need charging, as it is used daily, and the alternator keeps the battery charged. But like my boat, my C6 has an underhood charger, as it regularly sits for weeks or sometimes months without use, and it is a pain to jumpstart and re-index the windows.

brick

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3 hours ago, brick said:

Disagree. A quality multi-stage onboard charger will charge and then maintain a battery - starting or deep cycle - at the correct level. 

brick

I agree with Brick......... My charger will go into a standby mode. Almost to the point were its off. 

All chargers are not the same.... There are the 30 dollar ones and the 300 dollar ones. Whats in your boat??  

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My boat has a promariner prosport 2-back charger. Like the boat, it is now 12 years old. I might add a bit of distilled water once a year...

brick

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The CHEAPEST chargers today should be .....fairly smart.....

That means they WILL shut down if the current and or voltage are ...NOT ... charging correctly. Result is NO cooked batteries.

The College Degreed with a Masters Certificate have a sulphation program to clean up winter DISCONNECTED batteries. Result is long life with water needing batteries.

Problems DO OCCUR when a charger goes nutty.  Can easily burn out 2 batteries before the battery place says. 

 

GO AWAY & DO NOT COME BACK !!!        :haha-7383:

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4 hours ago, Bt Doctur said:

Good engine starting batters should never be on constant charge only house batteries.

There is no way to avoid that with Chap's (and any other lake boat brand) past and current wiring models. There is one charger with one, two, or three charging circuits. One charger, either on or off, either you charge all connected batteries or none. So, if you want house bank to be charged and maintained, the engin batteries will be charged and maintained as well.

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My boat has two cranking batteries and a battery switch. I turn off the switch when I'm not in the boat. Whenever I use the switch to pick one battery or the other. I try to alternate, but it's not an exact science because I'm never 100% sure which battery I used last time out.

Some weeks I'm on my boat 3-4 times a week, other times I may go 2+ weeks between uses.  In the winter, my batteries stay in the boat, stay connected (switch off), and the boat stays outside during the Virginia winter (covered on a lift). From November to late March when I typically fire it up for the first time. I've never used a charger, and my boat starts fine every time, even after the winter.  I check my batteries and add water if necessary 1-2 a year. The batteries are now 4 years old.

Sometimes I think we worry two much about our batteries and keep them on a charger for no reason. Without a drain, they'll stay charged a lot longer than you think.

 

 

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Newboat & I have the same batteries. No problems with   ....GOOD WORKING.....alternator. I treat my batteries the same way.   I have LEFT the battery connected AND the RULE computer bilge running all winter in cold / freezing  N Y  storage. On for 2 seconds off for 2 minutes. All winter. 2 years ago.  No problems. Battery goes to 12.7 after 2 days of resting.

Good batteries are good.   :o

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35 minutes ago, Richard W said:

There is no way to avoid that with Chap's (and any other lake boat brand) past and current wiring models. There is one charger with one, two, or three charging circuits. One charger, either on or off, either you charge all connected batteries or none. So, if you want house bank to be charged and maintained, the engin batteries will be charged and maintained as well.

So true. You could have 2 charges, but for this point its useless. I just remembered, an odd thing that happen to me. I do have 2 chargers, both ProMariner ProNauticP, but for a whole other reason. One looked like it was dead and the other was on. I thought is was gone for sure. It was in a deep sleep mode that not one LED was on. Once I turned on the radio, it came to life recharging the batteries. 

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The 28 Coastal I take care of has 1 battery for each engine and 1 house /electronics battery. The charger is a 2 bank  type. ,  . Engines are wired to #1 battery position ,a cable  jumper from the #2 position of each switch and then a cable to the house battery.

With the charger on the house is connected, should you experiance a weak/dead engine battery you switch the battery selector to #2 position for charging .

Should you be off shore and need more power to start an engine you switch to All, All on both switches. Now you have 3 batteries to try and start the motor

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I prefer to head out with both batteries fully charged. The onboard charger makes it very simple and fool (me) proof.

brick

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Yep batteries that were cooked and have 1 good start left .to get you out of the slip and then dead when you want to come back in.

 

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Why are we talking about battery charging by engine while discussing shore powered battery charger?

Chances are, the two charging systems have nothing in common and are connected to the batteries two different ways. Battery chargers, in most cases, bypass any battery switches and VSRs and are connected directly to the batteries via the switch posts but bypassing the switches.

Example ... not exactly the same switch setup but still relevant:

gallery_11046_1006_103433.jpg

In the approach above both batteries or banks are being charged whenever the shore powered charger is on. Unlike the alternator, the modern marine charger is going to sense the battery state and adjust the charging current accordingly. No harm done by leaving the charger on for the extended periods of time, providing the batteries are in good shape and the charger is working correctly.

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NEVER disconnect a battery from the running engine. Those main Battery switches are NOT supposed to disconnect a battery. Then connect to a different battery.

That causes the alternator to go to MAXIMUM VOLTAGE as 1 battery is disconnected. Some alternators are very quick to go to maximum voltage if a battery is disconnected.

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Good news my battery came back to normal I was at the cove for 6 1/2 hour and I keep the switch on house and after 6 1/2 hour the house battery started the engine. I was shocked it started? My crank battery was fully charged if the house did not work.... I thought I was going to have to buy new battery but I am in good shape now......

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I would not be too sure of it.  Take it to a FREE LOAD TEST at some auto parts place. You   MUST know how much life is left in it.

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