huhner

230 SSI 2001 Head Piano Hinge Causing break away

7 posts in this topic

I have a 2001 230 SSI.  It has the head with piano hinges.  The piano hinges are pulling away from the fiberglass and making the holes bigger and ruining the fiberglass.  It also causes the door to fall each time you pull it open and you have to pick it up in order to get it back into place where the door will close and be put into its seal.  I have tried toggle bolts, putting epoxy in the holes and nothing has worked.  Do anyone have a potential solution?  Thanks for the help!

 

2001 Chaparral SSI 230

 

 

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Is there a void inside or is it a solid fiberglass wall with oversized holes?

In either case the solution is similar, fill in the holes with poly or epoxy resin, or buildup the void with fiberglass. Redrill the holes using proper diameter drill bit, and install the hinge using the proper screws and no washers.

Use a dab of 3M 4000 or 4200 sealant to seal around the screw threads and to lock the screws in place.

BTW, the problem you have is caused by the round head screws (injury) and washers (insult). This contraption pulls the hinge from the wall whenever the door is being closed. Use the screws with countersink heads of proper diameter for that hinge. Look at the door side of the hinge for the screw type and size, and how to do it correctly. If the hinge is deformed, I bet it is, repair or replace the hinge first. Piano hinges require proper screws and precision of installation to work well. If done correctly, they work and last for nearly ever.

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22 hours ago, huhner said:

It is actually a void behind the hinge.  Thanks will give it a try!

 

I've faced a similar situation and the void was too much to fill, even with thickened epoxy.  I'm guessing the toggle bolts didn't work because the screw's pan head is too bulbous and doesn't allow the opposite side of the piano hinge to flush together when you close the door.  It makes it even worst when you add a washer to the screw head.  There's hardly any play room between the 2 hinge leafs when they're shut together.

A better solution for you might be to fill in the current holes in the jamb/frame side and sand them down as best as possible, prime just enough to protect the worked surface and then re-drill new (correct sized) holes for new screws an inch or inch and a half (up or down) away from the current ones in the piano hinge.  Then use a countersink drill bit to create a countersink in those holes for the screw heads to countersink into the hinge and be flush with it.  That way you don't get any binding when you close it (which is probably the problem).  Then line up the hinge and door on the frame, mark the new holes you just drilled in the hinge onto the jamb/frame and drill the correct size hole at the new locations and refasten the door.  It looks like you have enough room to even add a couple more holes and screws for good measure.  This way you're not drilling into the repaired holes that might not hold.  Make sure you get the right, stainless steel screws and know the size of holes & countersink before you proceed.  This should work nicely.

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On 9/7/2017 at 0:36 PM, Hatem said:

I've faced a similar situation and the void was too much to fill, even with thickened epoxy.  I'm guessing the toggle bolts didn't work because the screw's pan head is too bulbous and doesn't allow the opposite side of the piano hinge to flush together when you close the door.  It makes it even worst when you add a washer to the screw head.  There's hardly any play room between the 2 hinge leafs when they're shut together.

A better solution for you might be to fill in the current holes in the jamb/frame side and sand them down as best as possible, prime just enough to protect the worked surface and then re-drill new (correct sized) holes for new screws an inch or inch and a half (up or down) away from the current ones in the piano hinge.  Then use a countersink drill bit to create a countersink in those holes for the screw heads to countersink into the hinge and be flush with it.  That way you don't get any binding when you close it (which is probably the problem).  Then line up the hinge and door on the frame, mark the new holes you just drilled in the hinge onto the jamb/frame and drill the correct size hole at the new locations and refasten the door.  It looks like you have enough room to even add a couple more holes and screws for good measure.  This way you're not drilling into the repaired holes that might not hold.  Make sure you get the right, stainless steel screws and know the size of holes & countersink before you proceed.  This should work nicely.

That is a good idea!  Thanks!

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Just an update on this... I re-drilled the holes with the correct size and it has worked great to date.  Thanks for your help on this!!

 

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