jackbronson

boat not sitting fully on front rollers of trailer

73 posts in this topic

Hello,

The Admiral and I shopped for months for a new (to us) bowrider to replace our 30 year old Starcraft.  She sat on a Chaparral at the boat show, and a Chaparral is what we needed to buy.  Two kids in college required us to 'settle' for a 2008 Chaparral SSi 190. Beautiful boat, well cared for, low hours. It's on a LoadRite roller trailer that came with the boat. I bought the boat from the original owner, and the trailer came with the boat new. We trailer regularly.

Yesterday I noticed the boat bouncing up off the front rollers leaving the ramp. So I hooked up a video camera and went for a ride. Now this may be normal, but it seems that this boat is not sitting down properly on front set of rollers and is way too loose on the trailer. The rollers are all the way back at the transom. I use transom straps.  The boat was pulled up snug to the bow stop.

In this video I am leaving the driveway, you can see the boat floating over the forward rollers on the left side: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_kIeHtX_dI

And, when I took a 90 degree right turn on a bumpy road, the right side of the boat completely rose up off the rollers in what appears to me to be way too much. 15 second mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm3CzXt3_Wg 

I've always felt this boat seemed back heavy on the trailer.

Can anyone provide any feedback on if this is normal? If not, how to correct? I've gotten suggestions to put a chain pulling down on the bow eye, but I would think if this was the case the boat and trailer would have come equipped as such when new.

Thanks.

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You've got to find a way to pull that boat up further on the trailer. Too much weight on the rear rollers, very dangerous. If you can move your wench post forward a few inches. Post a few pics if you can. Be very careful with towing that set up before you can adjust it properly.

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I can move the boat forward at most 3 inches before the rear most roller is at the transom.

this now has me troubled, since if this is really wrong, then it was wrong from day 1.  the original owner bought it at a marina and kept it there, and trailered it about 5 miles each time twice a year.

How does the dealer or Chaparral allow something set up like this to be delivered to a customer?

Carandboat.JPG

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It`s good that you have room to move the post forward. I would start with 2-3 inches. I don't think it will take much to correct your problem.

One work of caution with any roller trailer, do not back down any ramp without the strap and chain attached to the boat. Do not unhook until the boat is in the water. You always see internet pics of boats that rolled of the trailer and hit the pavement before making it into the water.

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55 minutes ago, Chap243 said:

It`s good that you have room to move the post forward. I would start with 2-3 inches. I don't think it will take much to correct your problem.

One work of caution with any roller trailer, do not back down any ramp without the strap and chain attached to the boat. Do not unhook until the boat is in the water. You always see internet pics of boats that rolled of the trailer and hit the pavement before making it into the water.

if you care about your boat, its not smart to do that with any combo of boat or trailer.  Ive seen it three times in my life where boat came off the trailer with the lazy way of backing it down and letting it float off. 

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Our launch process requires both strap and chain be connected until the trailer is in the water. 

I think moving the winch post forward won't do it. I'm thinking the winch and bow stop need to drop down enough to let the boat sit on the forward rollers with more weight. This combined with moving the post maybe and inch might be required. 

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Also, it looks like you may have the ability to lower the bow roller (there's a set of holes above the current two). That may help the boat sit lower when snugged up against the bow roller.

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12 minutes ago, jackbronson said:

Our launch process requires both strap and chain be connected until the trailer is in the water. 

I think moving the winch post forward won't do it. I'm thinking the winch and bow stop need to drop down enough to let the boat sit on the forward rollers with more weight. This combined with moving the post maybe and inch might be required. 

Lowering the front roller might do it. It all depends of if the "lightness" of the front end is due to not enough forward weight or the bow stop holding up the boat bow up too high. Play around with both solutions, I think you will figure out a solution.

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Chaparral did not have anything to do with the trailer. Other than the H2O series, the dealer sources the trailer. And sometimes dealers provide the cheapest and marginal capacity trailer possible. I think your trailer is flexing. Certainly it has the potential to damage the boat. 

I also think your Acura MDX is likely under-rated to tow your boat. Assume it has a 3500lb tow rating, and even with the light single axle trailer, I would expect your total towed weight to e around 4000lbs. 

brick

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This MDX is rated for 5000 pounds. Factory tow package complete with factory stickers indicating the capacity.

Boat and trailer on the local truck scale came in at 4200 lbs.

Factory sticker on trailer indicates 3600 lb. capacity.

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Your trailer is flexing. Looks like the construction of the trailer is just bolted together -not welded. You need a heavier duty trailer.

brick

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As mentioned, lowering the bow roller so that it is not taking the load that should be on the front rollers should help.  I also agree with Brick that your trailer is flexing, but could be caused by all the weight being on the bow roller and the stern with little to nothing in the middle.  At 4200 total weight you would be over 3600lbs axle rating with 10% on the tongue and would have to shift more weight onto the tongue to reduce the axle load.  Shifting the weight onto the tongue will likely exceed your 500lbs vehicle tongue weight limit (guess based on 5000lbs towing capacity).  To get the Axle at the 3600lbs means 600lbs of tongue weight with 4200lb total weight.

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I prefer a tandem axle on anything bigger than 18 ft. A single axle on a 19 footer further indicates thAt the dealer took the cheap road. 

Sorry.

brick

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I would move the winch post forward 3 inches. Repeat the test drive with your video camera watching the same roller. This will improve the roller contact as well as put more weight forward on the tongue. Maybe even measure the distance from the hitch to the ground while hooked up before and after the reposition. This will indicate more tongue weight being placed on your vehicle.

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I would use a strap on the bow eye ring. Just like the transom is strapped down.

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Just now, Iggy said:

I would use a strap on the bow eye ring. Just like the transom is strapped down.

The transom straps do not appear to be holding, as the stern seems to be moving up and down. 

brick

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Tandem axle bunk trailer will solve all your worries. Roller trailers scare me. Especially bouncing around like that 

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9 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

Tandem axle bunk trailer will solve all your worries. Roller trailers scare me. Especially bouncing around like that 

Yup. Welded steel. 

brick

 

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For those who suggested winch post and bow roller adjustments, thanks very much. Those are the next logical step. I'll try those and report back on the results.  

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Here's a real simple test.  With the boat on the trailer and un-hooked from your car, Can you pick up the tongue of the trailer?  If so, you have too little tongue weight, and the winch post needs to be moved forward.  Otherwise loosen all the adjustment points and let the weight of the boat rest only on the rollers.  Then position the bow roller so that its snug against the bow eye, and tighten everything up.  If the roller is too high, it will push the bow up, and take weight off of the forward set of rollers. 

You may be able to improve on what you have, but ultimately you are pushing the limits of that trailer.  Does it even have brakes?  A proper trailer will be safer for you and your family, your boat, and everyone else on the road.  

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The marinas are known to be bad as far as selecting correct sized trailers.   MUCH WORSE on adjusting a trailer with cradle rollers.   You will need to go to public weighing scales to get the weight of the trailer on the tires. Then position the trailer so ONLY   the crank up jack stand is on the weigh scale. The jack stand should have at least 10%  of the added together, tire & jack stand weights. Adjusting those cradle roller arms is a different experience...........I would contact the trailer company & get their adjustment procedure E MAILED or mailed to you.   I have used a solid knot free 4" X 4" & a stack of cement blocks to get almost equal weights on the keel rollers. Then set 1 side of cradle arms just touching the hull. Do the same for the other side of cradle arms.

The cradle arms, IN MY OPINION, are not to support the boat. The keel & keel rollers are for that.

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TNBrett,

The boat is 2800 lbs. The trailer capacity is 3600 lbs.  Yes it has brakes.

i gotta know - on what basis do you make this assertion: "you are pushing the limits of that trailer"? 

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