jackbronson

boat not sitting fully on front rollers of trailer

73 posts in this topic

11 hours ago, jackbronson said:

TNBrett,

The boat is 2800 lbs. The trailer capacity is 3600 lbs.  Yes it has brakes.

i gotta know - on what basis do you make this assertion: "you are pushing the limits of that trailer"? 

If your trailer has a capacity/payload of 3600 lbs then you should be fine.  Seems that the trailer itself weighs 1400 lbs from the numbers provided.  4200lbs total minus 2800 boat weight equals 1400 lbs trailer.  

If you have at least 420 lbs of tongue weight then I dont think you need to move the winch post forward, just lower the bow roller.

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1 hour ago, jackbronson said:

TNBrett,

The boat is 2800 lbs. The trailer capacity is 3600 lbs.  Yes it has brakes.

i gotta know - on what basis do you make this assertion: "you are pushing the limits of that trailer"? 

Check the rating for the tires. You have 4200 lbs total weight, so 2100 lbs per tire. 

I would estimate your trailer weighs about 600 to 700 lbs. So your boat weighs about 3500 to 3600 lbs wet, which is right at the capacity you list for the trailer. 

Your video is proof that the trailer is max'd out.

brick

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16 hours ago, jackbronson said:

This MDX is rated for 5000 pounds. Factory tow package complete with factory stickers indicating the capacity.

Boat and trailer on the local truck scale came in at 4200 lbs.

Factory sticker on trailer indicates 3600 lb. capacity.

4200 lbs on a 3600 lb GVWR trailer is overweight.  If that 3600 lb rating is actually the capacity, I believe you are still pushing it, as I doubt that trailer weighs more than 500-600 lbs empty.  

I'm not trying to bust your chops.  You came here looking for advice and I think you got that.  Please let us know if the adjustments make an improvement.

BTW, if that 2800 lb you quoted is the published dry weight of the boat, that is typically useless in a discussion like this.  That figure will be with the smallest available engine, no options, no fuel, and no gear.

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After doing some additional research, I believe the trailer weighs in at about 1000 lbs with brakes and the boat therefore weighs 3200 lbs, below the 3600 lbs capacity.  

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7 minutes ago, Dennis A said:

After doing some additional research, I believe the trailer weighs in at about 1000 lbs with brakes and the boat therefore weighs 3200 lbs, below the 3600 lbs capacity.  

I agree. Capacity is the amount the trailer can carry. It is not the total combined weight of boat and trailer.

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Just now, Dennis A said:

After doing some additional research, I believe the trailer weighs in at about 1000 lbs with brakes and the boat therefore weighs 3200 lbs, below the 3600 lbs capacity.  

The weight of the trailer will be stamped on the capacity plate. I would be surprised if it weighs 1000lbs. It is a very light duty single axle trailer, more like 600 to 700 lbs.

Your boat dry weight does not include engine options, fuel, oil, battery, gear, etc. I would not be surprised for  it to total 3500 to 3600 lbs.

Regardless of weight split, your total weight is 4200lbs on a single axle. That is likely over the capacity of your tires. And it is lialso likely a 3500lb axle.

Your video is proof you need a better trailer. Moving weight forward is not going to fix the flexing.

i don't know how often or far the boat was trailered, but your video shows the potential for substantial damage. Get a heavier trailer.

brick

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Trailer is stamped 900 pounds.  Tires are rated for 2500 pounds.

 

to forum member brick: I am not buying a new trailer, so you can stop posting that on this thread.  thank you.

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Just some food for though.  I looked at a Crownline express cruiser last year.  A 24' if I recall.  Anyway, it was on a roller trailer.  There were some stress cracks in the hull between two sets of rollers.  Looking at the inside, it appeared that there was a bulkhead right over the cracks.  The surveyor surmised that the boat was probably trailered over some very rough terrain or maybe dropped off a curb or something.  The location of the rollers, led to uneven support resulting in stress cracks in the hull.   My opinion, for what ever its worth, is to make sure you get the rollers in even contact and that they stay that way.  Or get additional supports at key areas like the keel and keep the boat from moving on them.  From the video it looks like things move around a lot.  Though it would be interesting to GoPro other guys trailers to see how things move, or don't move, on other types of trailer and boat combinations.

 

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Roady, this part: "Though it would be interesting to GoPro other guys trailers to see how things move, or don't move, on other types of trailer and boat combinations."   I totally thought to myself that maybe boats must move some, although not to the extent mine did in the video which i am addressing, but how many people really know?  you'd have to set up a video camera to truly know.  regardless of the size of the trailer, unless you somehow manage to really strap it tight to the trailer (using multiple methods) a 3000+ boat that is sitting on top of rollers or bunks is going to move over bumps.

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jackbronson, filming it with GoPro is very professional and creative approach! I love it!
I'm going to do same with my boat on trailer just from curiosity.
 

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1 hour ago, jackbronson said:

Trailer is stamped 900 pounds.  Tires are rated for 2500 pounds.

 

to forum member brick: I am not buying a new trailer, so you can stop posting that on this thread.  thank you.

No problem, jackbronson. Good luck with your problem...

brick

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http://www.eyer@#$%@#ch.com/trailer-weight.html

 

this should help clear up any misnomers or confusion.  Any unsureness of weight should mean bringing the item to the scale and not guessing. 

 

according to the books that boat weighs 2900lbs with the 4.3 engine.  Then add 6lbs for every gallon of gas in there.  oil, other lube etc.  Then every rope and anchor and so forth.  Definitely at the limits of that trailer, but take all the information and make an informed decision.

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Do you have radial or bias-ply tires? When I've purchased boat, trailer had bias-ply and was very bumpy.
I needed to replace them and I switched to radial - it was day and night difference.

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5 minutes ago, leonid said:

Do you have radial or bias-ply tires? When I've purchased boat, trailer had bias-ply and was very bumpy.
I needed to replace them and I switched to radial - it was day and night difference.

trailers should be radial and load range probably D maybe C at minimum.

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1 hour ago, leonid said:

jackbronson, filming it with GoPro is very professional and creative approach! I love it!
I'm going to do same with my boat on trailer just from curiosity.
 

Thanks! actually, I had to do it with my "old school" handheld video camera which is palm sized and records to an SD card (the household GoPro owner/operator has gone off to college).  mounted that to a handheld video camera thing my son bought for filming skateboarders or whatever, and duct taped it like mad to the trailer.  looked funny for sure, but it was Sunday morning so quiet roads.  and as old school as that video camera is, its still high def so the quality is awesome!  i'll be rigging it up again after i make some adjustments.

My first run at filming with my phone (sitting in the back seat with the tailgate up while the Admiral drove) only produced nauseating footage.

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Need to get rid of the OLD & Obsolete standard of  NOT USING car steel belted radials on trailers.   AUTO STEEL belted tires ARE THE SAFEST tires to carry people in anything.

Anybody recommending TRAILER tires on a car ?

Steel belted radials last FOREVER on a trailer. No blowouts . No hydroplaning. Mileage ?  They LAST over 20 years. On a boat trailer. Should go for a lifetime.

Last time I checked they had a percentage reduction of carrying capacity per tire.  They have FAR FAR high speed ratings. 

I am surprised the trailer tire companies have not been SUED for putting over priced, dangerous tires, on a trailer. If the trailer blows It can take the car out of control.

Go with passenger tires.

 

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2 hours ago, cyclops2 said:

 

Steel belted radials last FOREVER on a trailer. No blowouts . No hydroplaning. Mileage ?  They LAST over 20 years. On a boat trailer. Should go for a lifetime.

 

Wrong.

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11 hours ago, jackbronson said:

to forum member brick: I am not buying a new trailer, so you can stop posting that on this thread.  thank you.

Take it easy pal.  We're only trying to help.  That's what you came here for right?  

Was the 4200# weight at the truck scales the weight on the trailer axle, or did it include tongue weight as well?  if not, 5-10% for tongue weight would add upwards of 400#.  at 4600# - 900# trailer weight = 3700# of boat = overweight.  If 4200# really is the total weight,  4200# - 900# trailer = 3300# of boat.  3300# divided by 3600# = 92% of capacity = pushing the limit.  B)

In actuality, none of that matters.  Look at the videos you posted.  The frame of that trailer is flexing under the weight of your boat just pulling out of your driveway.  

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Phillbo

What part of auto tires is WRONG ? Since trailer companies are putting the CHEAPER & higher QUALITY car tires on trailers for years.

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23 minutes ago, cyclops2 said:

 

Phillbo

What part of auto tires is WRONG ? Since trailer companies are putting the CHEAPER & higher QUALITY car tires on trailers for years.

ehhh trailer tires can last a while, some people get itchy and replace to early, but every 5 years maybe 7-8 maxiumum you need to replace them, they wont logically last 20 years in most conditions.

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11 hours ago, TNBrett said:

Take it easy pal.  We're only trying to help.  That's what you came here for right?  

Was the 4200# weight at the truck scales the weight on the trailer axle, or did it include tongue weight as well?  if not, 5-10% for tongue weight would add upwards of 400#.  at 4600# - 900# trailer weight = 3700# of boat = overweight.  If 4200# really is the total weight,  4200# - 900# trailer = 3300# of boat.  3300# divided by 3600# = 92% of capacity = pushing the limit.  B)

In actuality, none of that matters.  Look at the videos you posted.  The frame of that trailer is flexing under the weight of your boat just pulling out of your driveway.  

that's the problem its the wrong trailer, has a 3500lb axle.  At best there maybe is 1-200lbs to spare on that trailer that's it.  Only way I would be happy with this trailer is if it was a lot trailer, or trailer used to go a few miles a few times a year.  Ideally after selling or trading this trailer and finding a new or used one the OP probably wouldn't have more than a few grand into something that was more acceptable.  If not I would be doing regular maint checks and greasings to ensure the trailer is operating correctly due to the stress. or try to move it forward and play with moving the roller up front up or down to get a more even load.

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