EricGT

A novice question about winterizing.

17 posts in this topic

Hopefully this post will assist another novice and I am not the only idiot in here about what appears to be a simple practice.

I have a heated storage unit, but want to add antifreeze due to it's simplicity and low cost.  Peace of mind is another reason too.

So I see these two kits:

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--engine-winterizing-kit--520411?recordNum=7

https://jet.com/product/detail/c4d648b8f498443ea87432c3a00d7068?jcmp=pla:ggl:NJ_dur_Gen_Sporting_Goods_a2:Sporting_Goods_Boating_Boat_Parts_Accessories_a2:na:PLA_783891037_42653331018_pla-302540231690:na:na:na:2&code=PLA15&pid=kenshoo_int&c=783891037&is_retargeting=true&clickid=0ade2504-4b7a-4c75-84e5-1b821b26e081

Both appear to hold 5 gallons of anti-freeze and are powered by the pressure of a garden hose.  It is my ASSumption I hook this kit to the muffs I use to flush my engine and follow the same process of running the engine for 5 minutes.

Is this correct?

Also, is there any concern with the anti-freeze mixture running down the driveway?  I have two dogs in which I am aware anti-freeze can be toxic.

I guess what would be left after this is oil and filter change and fuel filter/separator.

Anyone in South central PA want to stop by for a case of beer and an hour of instruction?  This is all new to me. 

But I hate to spend another $400 this year to have my boat winterized for a process that seems to be pretty basic in nature.

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Ether kit is good. BUT first off, you want the AF that is made for engines that is non-toxic. As in   http://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?name=camco-freeze-ban-50-antifreeze-engine-cooling-systems-and-potable-water&path=-1|2285701|2285712&id=138806

Yes, try to have another boater show you!! Too far for me............

It is simple to do once someone shows you. Do some internet searches too. 

 

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I have a dog and the anti-freeze in my driveway has never been a problem.  However, it will kill your grass.  

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A few years ago, the shop had left me uncertain whether the engine was winterized or not. So, the following year, I took it upon myself to do it. After watching several you-tube vids and discussed it with West Marine, I picked your second link. 

I was really nervous as I didn't want to cook or freeze my engine. But when I finished, I was laughing all the way....mostly at myself at how easy it is and why I waited so many years to do it myself. As the saying goes, If I can do it....anybody can.

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Perhaps this will help. Secondly, buy the OEM manuals for your ride as they will save you big bucks over the long haul. I would add pulling the prop set as Volvos have a habit of freezing onto the shafts if not serviced annually. Buy the specialty wrench, store them inside where they wont find legs, and grease the shaft splines before your spring re-install. Have your drive pulled and engine alignment checked at 100 hours, and every 300 hours thereafter, and change the raw water pump impeller every 2 years. Clean the flame arrestor, and use the attachment as a general guide until you get your manuals and learn the specifics about your ride. Engine, out drive, and ECM manual will teach you what you don't know. Sorry the "steps" appear out of order as PHOTOBUCKET rearranged things a bit, but if you follow the numbers you will get the basic idea.

http://s526.photobucket.com/user/wingnutmfs/library/Winterization Merc 496256 SSX

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Eric, Save yourself the money and pass on that system. There is a simpler, more effective and positive way of achieving the same thing.

Simply drain the block and manifolds by removing the plugs, then remove the hoses to and from the raw water pump drain the water out and reinstall. In essence, get all of the water out of the system. Replace the plugs after poking the holes with a stiff wire to break up any clogs.  Then disconnect the large hose going into the top of the thermostat housing and pour your pink, safe, antifreeze directly into this large hose. it will fill the entire block with 100% antifreeze, re connect hose when full. Pull the manifold hoses off the thermostat housing and with a funnel, pour in antifreeze until full, then reconnect the hoses.  Also don't forget to drain the fuel pump cooler lines.

By doing it this way you are assured of draining out all the water and replacing with pure antifreeze. 

 

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1 hour ago, Chap243 said:

Eric, Save yourself the money and pass on that system. There is a simpler, more effective and positive way of achieving the same thing.

Simply drain the block and manifolds by removing the plugs, then remove the hoses to and from the raw water pump drain the water out and reinstall. In essence, get all of the water out of the system. Replace the plugs after poking the holes with a stiff wire to break up any clogs.  Then disconnect the large hose going into the top of the thermostat housing and pour your pink, safe, antifreeze directly into this large hose. it will fill the entire block with 100% antifreeze, re connect hose when full. Pull the manifold hoses off the thermostat housing and with a funnel, pour in antifreeze until full, then reconnect the hoses.  Also don't forget to drain the fuel pump cooler lines.

By doing it this way you are assured of draining out all the water and replacing with pure antifreeze. 

 

depends.  I always liked sucking it up from the drive that way I knew AF has touched everything from the lowest spot possible to the highest to include the drive.  Not saying your method is wrong but I prefer the other.

 

To the OP you need the pink AF that's made for RVs and boats, says non toxic right on it, I always ran clean water over it when done just to dilute and make it better for the grass.  Those set ups work fine, or you can make your own with a few fitting and a bucket.  Youll need 4-5 gallons of antifreeze, and have to run the boat up to operating temp should be 160 or so or whenever your temp gauge stops.  Have your set up ready when the gauge pops to operating temp switch to your set up and run the AF dry shut off and done.  Some people use fogger on carb engines, and if you have a duo prop take off and grease and put back on or store,  store with drive down. 

 

Its important that if you use this set up you don't do it with the engine cold, if you do the AF wont get circulated properly. On a hose most engines only take a few mins to get to operating temp

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2 hours ago, Chap243 said:

Simply drain the block and manifolds by removing the plugs, then remove the hoses to and from the raw water pump drain the water out and reinstall. In essence, get all of the water out of the system.

If you have a Merc 3 point drain system, is it still necessary to remove fuel pump cooler lines and such? Or does that just do the block and manifolds?

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29 minutes ago, Waterfun said:

If you have a Merc 3 point drain system, is it still necessary to remove fuel pump cooler lines and such? Or does that just do the block and manifolds?

Not sure about Merc as mine is a Volvo and I knew the OP has a Volvo. Perhaps some Merc guys can chime in.

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1 hour ago, soldier4402 said:

depends.  I always liked sucking it up from the drive that way I knew AF has touched everything from the lowest spot possible to the highest to include the drive.  Not saying your method is wrong but I prefer the other.

 

To the OP you need the pink AF that's made for RVs and boats, says non toxic right on it, I always ran clean water over it when done just to dilute and make it better for the grass.  Those set ups work fine, or you can make your own with a few fitting and a bucket.  Youll need 4-5 gallons of antifreeze, and have to run the boat up to operating temp should be 160 or so or whenever your temp gauge stops.  Have your set up ready when the gauge pops to operating temp switch to your set up and run the AF dry shut off and done.  Some people use fogger on carb engines, and if you have a duo prop take off and grease and put back on or store,  store with drive down. 

 

Its important that if you use this set up you don't do it with the engine cold, if you do the AF wont get circulated properly. On a hose most engines only take a few mins to get to operating temp

I don't like sucking from the drive since you are starting with a block and manifold full of raw water already.  Most of the antifreeze you suck in goes straight out the exhaust with very little circulating through the block.  The burst ratings on RV/Marine antifreeze is based on an undiluted concentration and the little bit mixing with the water in the block is far from undiluted.  The end mix in the block is unknown.  Many do it this way, but not me.  I am not that lucky.

I drain as much water from the block/manifolds and re-fill with RV/Marine antifreeze all without running the engine.  I am also sure to pour antifreeze back through the raw water inlet hose displacing the water in the oil coolers and flushing it back out through the drive.  

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7 minutes ago, Dennis A said:

I don't like sucking from the drive since you are starting with a block and manifold full of raw water already.  Most of the antifreeze you suck in goes straight out the exhaust with very little circulating through the block.  The burst ratings on RV/Marine antifreeze is based on an undiluted concentration and the little bit mixing with the water in the block is far from undiluted.  The end mix in the block is unknown.  Many do it this way, but not me.  I am not that lucky.

I drain as much water from the block/manifolds and re-fill with RV/Marine antifreeze all without running the engine.  I am also sure to pour antifreeze back through the raw water inlet hose displacing the water in the oil coolers and flushing it back out through the drive.  

to each their own.  Been doing it that way for over 20 years on multiple boats with no issues in northern below 0 climate.  Key is to ensure the thermo pops and you run it with enough pink.  The dilution factor is probably real and I always though about it, but where you might be wrong is the pink isn't just magically passing through the exhaust it has to circulate if you have the thermo open, it has to plain and simple.  Not to get into specifics but I am assuming for a block to burst it would take an engine being full of a significant amount of water not just a little bit and not just diluted AF.  For me by doing the draining method, did I get it all, did I forget something, when I poured in the AF did it get it everywhere I wanted, not risk I want to take.  At least I know pink has properly circulated through every part of the engine.  Again were getting into which oil is better argument.

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Thanks for the replies guys!

This obviously shows I need to do some more research.  However, I do like the 'pink' antifreeze via kit method.

It costs less than $40 and seems fairly easy and foolproof.  So let the engine idle for 5 minutes (temp gauge 160*), open the shut off so the antifreeze mixes, and run until the 5 gallons is gone.

Sounds easy, unless I am over-simplifying it. 

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23 minutes ago, soldier4402 said:

to each their own.  Been doing it that way for over 20 years on multiple boats with no issues in northern below 0 climate.  Key is to ensure the thermo pops and you run it with enough pink.  The dilution factor is probably real and I always though about it, but where you might be wrong is the pink isn't just magically passing through the exhaust it has to circulate if you have the thermo open, it has to plain and simple.  Not to get into specifics but I am assuming for a block to burst it would take an engine being full of a significant amount of water not just a little bit and not just diluted AF.  For me by doing the draining method, did I get it all, did I forget something, when I poured in the AF did it get it everywhere I wanted, not risk I want to take.  At least I know pink has properly circulated through every part of the engine.  Again were getting into which oil is better argument.

This is far from a "which oil is better" argument.    Study the flow through the thermostat housing, not all the fluid passing through the sea water pump goes through the engine. At idle, the thermostat is barely open and most of the sea water pump flow is being sent to the exhaust elbows.  

 

coolfig6.jpg

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1 hour ago, Dennis A said:

This is far from a "which oil is better" argument.    Study the flow through the thermostat housing, not all the fluid passing through the sea water pump goes through the engine. At idle, the thermostat is barely open and most of the sea water pump flow is being sent to the exhaust elbows.  

 

coolfig6.jpg

Like I said there is multiple methods that work and are proven.  The thermostat once open is open, no such thing as a thermo state barely being open or kind of open unless its defective. Like I said a few ways to do it as long as you pay attention and do it right.

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1 hour ago, EricGT said:

Thanks for the replies guys!

This obviously shows I need to do some more research.  However, I do like the 'pink' antifreeze via kit method.

It costs less than $40 and seems fairly easy and foolproof.  So let the engine idle for 5 minutes (temp gauge 160*), open the shut off so the antifreeze mixes, and run until the 5 gallons is gone.

Sounds easy, unless I am over-simplifying it. 

pretty much, I say 160 but depends on what kind of thermostat you have, but youll know by seeing the gauge it will stop moving and should be the temp you normally see while running.  To speed up the process you can give it a little more than idle speed but watch over heating.  Typically when running pink I go a little bit above idle as well to ensure better flow. 

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1 hour ago, soldier4402 said:

Like I said there is multiple methods that work and are proven.  The thermostat once open is open, no such thing as a thermo state barely being open or kind of open unless its defective. Like I said a few ways to do it as long as you pay attention and do it right.

Thermostats like the ones we are talking about here are not binary open/shut, they begin to open at the rated temp and are fully open 25degF above rated temp.  

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