Auggie

Trailer winch

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I want to update my winch and cable to a new winch and tether. My boat weighs 6500 dry. How many pounds winch should I have. I tried to find markings on my current one but there are none. I'm looking at a 1500 lb. Winch. Is that enough?

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I am using a Fulton F2 3200 lb rated winch on my 220SSi. 

You will need a two speed winch. Bigger is better...

brick

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Yeah they come in a few different sizes.  Think some of the main ones are like 7-800, 1500 and around 3klbs.  I would probably get the 3200lb one and ensure you get a two speed.

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On 1/7/2018 at 9:09 PM, brick said:

I am using a Fulton F2 3200 lb rated winch on my 220SSi. 

You will need a two speed winch. Bigger is better...

brick

+1 on Fulton F2...works great on my 257ssx

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Hey guys. I'm curious. What dictates the need for an electric winch in your area? Do you have to winch the boat a long distance up the trailer? Where I launch I can drive my cruiser on the trailer to the bump stop. i only use the winch to snug it down about 1/2 a crank. 

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I winch up the last 4 or 5 feet. Wife drives the boat on the trailer, and does not like to power load. Bunks catch and center the boat. If I put the trailer in deeper, less winch required, but the boat is not held by the bunks. So I winch a few feet and get a free workout. We can load the boat in about 30 seconds. 

brick

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I think an electric winch would be dictated by your current ability to manually do it.  I have boats from 16-30ft and I could winch them 100ft if I have to but I'm also young.  But typically We float the boat as far as possible usually within  4-5 feet.  For me unless I was physically unable to I would never get electric, cost more adds weights, and is one more point of failure that I don't need to worry about when at the launch with 68 boats in line

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I love a electric WENCHES :haha-7383:

 

I really use them if a boat is struggling to reload in side wind, current or both. WE  walk the line out to the boat. Snap on to it. Boat goes GENTLY into a snug reverse condition. Person gets out of the water. Boat driver stays in reverse & steers the sterndrive to line up with centerline of the trailer. Winch operator starts to pull in the boat.  Boat driver keeps the boat lined up with reverse.  In 1' to MAYBE 2' waves.A guide person on the tow vehicle, hand signals the boat driver, as  he is about to come on to the trailer bunks. Between a winch & STURDY guide poles anything can be loaded

Piece of cake.  :lol:

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I did wander a bit............ It really is dependent on the steepness of the ramp. Friction of the bunk material. How long you want to wait.  How much power your truck wiring can supply without dropping too much voltage under full dragging resistance. Dry bunks the last 2'.

I ...CHEAT A LOT  !   I DO NOT have the bunks SNUGLY AGAINST THE HULL !............  EXCEPT for the last 2'.

The center rollers do the reduction of all that drag.

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3 hours ago, cyclops2 said:

I did wander a bit............ It really is dependent on the steepness of the ramp. Friction of the bunk material. How long you want to wait.  How much power your truck wiring can supply without dropping too much voltage under full dragging resistance. Dry bunks the last 2'.

 

You cannot power an electric winch with trailer wiring. 

brick

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I equipped mine with a snatch block which almost doubles pulling capacity, cuts cable strain in half, and in practice actually does not double loading time as winch runs at near no load speed. I also use a DOT trailer harness and plug from a tractor trailer. #6 conductors doubled handle winch feed and heavy duty ground, and remaining 10# conductors handle back up light, brake reverse solenoid, turn signals, and running lights. Single plug hook-up.

http://www.easternmarine.com/Electrical-Cables-Plugs-Sockets/

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The other winch power option is a small car battery on the trailer & locked closed.  Or as 3 boaters wanted. The small battery in a marine box & strapped down in the rear of the tow vehicle. We used those battery connectors sold at McMaster- Carr

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Can you mount side bunks on the trailer to deal with currents and a steep ramp and allow you to not have to winch so much? 

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22 hours ago, Phillbo said:

Hey guys. I'm curious. What dictates the need for an electric winch in your area? Do you have to winch the boat a long distance up the trailer? Where I launch I can drive my cruiser on the trailer to the bump stop. i only use the winch to snug it down about 1/2 a crank. 

Not allowed to power load at most ramps in my area.

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I have always power loaded to the stop, unless on the rare occasion picking up at a shallow incline ramp.  My rule of thumb was to stop the vehicle at the point my tail pipe got close to the waterline.

I’ve never heard of a ramp that had a policy of no power loading.  Bet the bass fisherman love that, those 2 man teams are by far the most efficient load/unload folks (like 30 seconds each way).  In fact, most I see don’t even secure the tie down before pulling up the ramp (crazy risk in my PoV).

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most ramps ive ever been to says no power loading.  Power loading is a poor practice that eventually will wear away any ramp unless the concrete runs 100 feet out.  Beyond that can be a dangerous practice to do so, more than once I have seen a boat damage itself from hitting the trailer and saw one cruiser almost wind up in the back of the truck.  better off floating it on.

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my venture trailer came with a  Fulton T3205 winch , rated at 3200 lbs.

The opening in the winch handle (that mates to the shaft), became out of round; i replace that.  Now i am replacing the shaft, under warranty.

According to fulton, it sounds like the winch is too small for me, my boat is 5800 lbs dry.  I have glides on the bunk too.

If i were to replace it, i would go bigger.  And i only use the trailer twice a year to launch in the spring and to pull out in the fall.

 

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7 minutes ago, rreale said:

my venture trailer came with a  Fulton T3205 winch , rated at 3200 lbs.

The opening in the winch handle (that mates to the shaft), became out of round; i replace that.  Now i am replacing the shaft, under warranty.

According to fulton, it sounds like the winch is too small for me, my boat is 5800 lbs dry.  I have glides on the bunk too.

If i were to replace it, i would go bigger.  And i only use the trailer twice a year to launch in the spring and to pull out in the fall.

 

winch on the trailer will probably never be as much as your boat it weighs it doesn't have to be.

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1 hour ago, soldier4402 said:

most ramps ive ever been to says no power loading.  Power loading is a poor practice that eventually will wear away any ramp unless the concrete runs 100 feet out.  Beyond that can be a dangerous practice to do so, more than once I have seen a boat damage itself from hitting the trailer and saw one cruiser almost wind up in the back of the truck.  better off floating it on.

Interesting rule and news to me. wondering if it’s a region of the country thing.  Any idea who or how it’s enforced (formal tickets or more self policing)?

To your erosion point, that makes perfect sense and sound basis for rule.  As to the danger, one of two things come to mind; 1) revocation of watercraft operating rights or 2) natural selection gene purge.  Only exception would be risk of uncontrollable mechanical malfunction.

Not trying to be argumentative at all, just an interesting learning on my part.  Sorry to have hijacked the winch thread!!

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8 minutes ago, Wak'in said:

Interesting rule and news to me. wondering if it’s a region of the country thing.  Any idea who or how it’s enforced (formal tickets or more self policing)?

To your erosion point, that makes perfect sense and sound basis for rule.  As to the danger, one of two things come to mind; 1) revocation of watercraft operating rights or 2) natural selection gene purge.  Only exception would be risk of uncontrollable mechanical malfunction.

Not trying to be argumentative at all, just an interesting learning on my part.  Sorry to have hijacked the winch thread!!

Formally enforced not so sure, I think have seen the DNR enforce it a few times a public ramps, but I think its more of a hey ahole stop ruining the ramp kind of a thing. 

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2 hours ago, soldier4402 said:

most ramps ive ever been to says no power loading.  Power loading is a poor practice that eventually will wear away any ramp unless the concrete runs 100 feet out.  Beyond that can be a dangerous practice to do so, more than once I have seen a boat damage itself from hitting the trailer and saw one cruiser almost wind up in the back of the truck.  better off floating it on.

My ramp has concrete probably 200' past the water line. They extend it during low water periods. 

When legal, power loading is not dangerous (idiots who can not operate their boat are the dangerous ones) when done correctly. I launch and retrieve single handed so it's nice to power load.  

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28 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

My ramp has concrete probably 200' past the water line. They extend it during low water periods. 

When legal, power loading is not dangerous (idiots who can not operate their boat are the dangerous ones) when done correctly. I launch and retrieve single handed so it's nice to power load.  

well theres usually more idiots then not on the water.  Frankly I don't care if people destroy their own property, actually cheap entertainment.  But I do care about ramps and prop wash can destroy them.

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