TNBrett

Any opinions on a Ram truck vs Chevy

30 posts in this topic

Here is Wisconsin it seems that Dodge/Ram trucks over a year or two old have significant body rust and holes. Not seeing the same from late model Chevy/GMC or Fords. Of course the newer Fords are aluminum.  I haven't seen rust on my GMCs and my last one was 8 years old when I traded it. 

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In the last 8 years I had a RAM 1500 2011 Sport, a 2500 Cummins Laramie 2015 and since a couple of month a 3500 Cummins DRW Laramie Limited 2017. I am in Canada so we can say the weather is pretty rough (Calcium, salt snow extreme temperature etc... I can see there is a lot of bad experience out there but I never had any issues with my trucks (rust or mechanical problems) and trust me... I am towing... All RAM users don't have troubles. Just my 2 cents. If I had to buy another truck I would go for a RAM again because I love the shape and never had any problem. If you love it, then try it and make your own judgment ;).

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11 hours ago, Exoset said:

In the last 8 years I had a RAM 1500 2011 Sport, a 2500 Cummins Laramie 2015 and since a couple of month a 3500 Cummins DRW Laramie Limited 2017. I am in Canada so we can say the weather is pretty rough (Calcium, salt snow extreme temperature etc... I can see there is a lot of bad experience out there but I never had any issues with my trucks (rust or mechanical problems) and trust me... I am towing... All RAM users don't have troubles. Just my 2 cents. If I had to buy another truck I would go for a RAM again because I love the shape and never had any problem. If you love it, then try it and make your own judgment ;).

Three trucks over 8 years does not speak to the issue of longevity, IMO.   Good to get direct feedback though.

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On 1/14/2018 at 9:27 AM, Wingnut said:

The Cummings offerings are really loud. They use a vacuum pump driven off the power steering pump to run accessories, and they are prone to oil leakage. Three stage fuel pumps fail too as there is a primary in the fuel tank, an intermediate on the frame, and the actual injector pump on the engine which is about $1,800 to rebuild. My neighbor has a Ram 3500 extended cab and it's been a nightmare. He bought it new, hauls virtually nothing, and it spends many days in my shop here. THe story I'm about to tell will have you thinking that this thing plows snow on salted roads for a living, but in fact it's a glorified grocery getter.

1.) He stops over at 56,000 miles and says he hears a noise. I take a ride and tell him the front brake pads are metal to metal. I pull the cast aluminum wheel off only to find the honeycomb between the brake rotor halves has rusted out and a chunk broke off busting the pad material from the backing plate. The other pad is almost new thickness. New front rotors and pads and an insulator gasket between the rotor casting and the aluminum wheel and he's back on the road.

2.) At 64,000 mile he stop by again and rear disc rotors are suffering the same fate as the front. Same fix and I'm starting to hate cast aluminum wheels bolted to cast iron rotors.

3.) At 70,000 Transmission won't lock up the converter, so I go on line and read about a resistor that must be added to the wiring harness to prevent this issue as it is a function of weak alternator diodes which it's said are common. Sounds like Bull to me so I talk to the dealer. They say, oh yea,  Dodge is aware, but there is a resistor kit you can buy on line that fixes the problem. REALLY??? I cut the harness apart, solder in the tiny resistor, and problem is solved.

4.) At 75,000 he says the transmission is slipping again. I take a ride and say no, the engine is suffering from fuel starvation. The in tank pump has failed and starved the injector pump long enough that it too needs rebuild. The local top notch diesel garage does the repair and replaces the transmission cooling lines which are rusted almost through, and $3,500 later he's back on the road.

5.) Now it's hey, I hear a funny noise. Front hub bearing on the left side is bad at 80,000. He says is that common? I say yea, at about 250,000, but not now. We find that the bearing is frozen into the chunk, and fab a massive puller and I put the torch with a rosebud on the chunk until the thing is cherry red. Took about 15 minutes of pulling and pounding but it came loose and flew half way across the shop. New sealed OEM bearing was massive and cost $350. Oh, and the upper ball joint was also bad so that got replaced. I say, this is a fluke and you should be fine.

6.) Made it all the way to 83,000 before the right side wheel bearing failed. That marks the second one I've ever had to replace in my 64 years.

7.) He takes it in to the local shop for lube and oil change. Tech says let me show you something. He says this is very common on these Rams. The frame is rusted through as it is a box structure with no way for accumulated moisture to escape. He brings it to me and asks if it is safe to drive. I craw under the thing, and push my finger through the frame with ease and stop when I get to the steering box mount. To me that hunk seems somewhat vital. He takes the truck into town, and after visiting the three top shops, they tell him they won't touch it. I bite the bullet (can't say no to these special people) and spend three days cutting out rot, making templates, cutting steel and welding overhead. He says I can't even see where it was repaired. I say GOOD, neither will the guy you sell this piece of junk to. The dealer looks over the job and asks if I'm available to do some work for their customers. Heck NO...   He then says how lucky my friend was, as on the standard cabs, the frames actually rot out between the bed and cab and can actually crack all the way through.

OK, Dodge rant complete. Buy the Chevy as their ISUZU diesels are whisper quiet. I'm thinking the Dodge is cheaper for a reason, but hasen't that always been the case?  W

 All Chrysler products seem to rust out soon. You can see them going down the road every day.  Denny.

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11 hours ago, Futzin' said:

Three trucks over 8 years does not speak to the issue of longevity, IMO.   Good to get direct feedback though.

I have put 60-65 K Miles on each, on rude environment from -31 F the winter in Qc and above 104 F when in Florida in summer. Sure it is just 8 years but if I had to compare with my old life in Europe, let me tell you 8 years here in Canada is like 15-20 years back there. I see you are in KY for example, not entirely sure you have those kind of climate, it is like comparing a boat in salt water and one in raw water. Not the same thing.

 

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